Protecting against dementia

Health, Fitness, Insurance, ...
7Wannabe5
Posts: 6649
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:03 am

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

Sclass wrote:I read someplace online where an old guy said the problem with getting old is none of your friends are young.
:lol: So true.

My 3 younger sisters and I have long had a mutual support society in old age plan, but we have yet to even enact Step 1 which would be the joint purchase of property in resort area. We figure that if our eventual old age domicile first functions as extended family vacation locale, the kids, grandkids, great-grand-kids, and various younger friends, will like the idea of coming there even when it is inhabited by 1 to 4 decrepit old ladies.

One obvious problem with such a co-operative plan, whether between related or unrelated age-peers, is that relationships with significant others are bound to interfere, possibly right up until the end of life. Another problem is that it is not all that likely that it will work out that slide to decrepitude is similar between all parties, or even if it is, the individual flavors of decrepitude may compound problems rather than complement as solution set. For instance, maybe I am wandering around in a fog of dementia dropping pudding everywhere, and one of my sister has brittle bones that may break when she slips on the pudding.

That said, even at the not so very old age of 55, my social circle is already co-operating in a good deal of minor stuff starts popping up health care. I mean even if your engine, transmission, and whatever-the-third-most-crucial-expensive-thing-on-a-car-would-be are still in good shape, all sorts of little stuff starts going wrong as you age, or simply not renewing itself as quickly as when you were younger. So, you will at least need somebody to give you a ride to the dealership when your heater fan stops spinning or your exhaust pipe crumbles in a pot hole. That's why it might be my plan to get married again when I am 57.

AnalyticalEngine
Posts: 403
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2018 11:57 am

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by AnalyticalEngine »

Interesting discussion. I've seen what Sclass is describing with members of my own extended family. In general, social capital works best when one isn't a liability. People tend to avoid others who are liabilities. Thus one needs to avoid as many liabilities in one's own life as the aging process takes its toll.

Living close to services strikes me as something critical to do in old age. You are better off living in an apartment next to the hospital than in a 4-bedroom house filled with clutter.

Alphaville
Posts: 2114
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by Alphaville »

AnalyticalEngine wrote:
Thu Sep 24, 2020 10:22 am
Interesting discussion. I've seen what Sclass is describing with members of my own extended family. In general, social capital works best when one isn't a liability. People tend to avoid others who are liabilities. Thus one needs to avoid as many liabilities in one's own life as the aging process takes its toll.
i’m not sure if this is a universal truth or more a function of late capitalist societies where family relations are more transactional.

i grew up orbiting a large family compound with 4 generations living together. times were difficult and everybody sort of pitched in looking after each other, had most meals together, etc. children were raised by the proverbial village, and there was resilience in the system—e.g. one parent died, the other adults took over.

then the old people died, cared for by everyone younger, but then properties were sold, everyone splintered, families went nuclear, and relationships became more distant.

in the new nuclear houses old people are lonelier and the children are strangers. curiously enough, everyone is doing “better” economically and there’s no lack of money, but family ties are weaker. and without resilient network support, everyone watches their individual money like a hawk.

User avatar
Sclass
Posts: 2067
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2012 5:15 pm
Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by Sclass »

During one of my discussions with mom’s caregivers we spoke of pill bottle time. My mother told me in her 50s she never wanted to live like some dementia stricken people we knew. But without a plan, her words were useless. I’d just recall them as I was dragging her mess along behind me as I fought to preserve my own lifestyle.

The caregiver said you have a narrow window to access the bottle of pills. When it is time, you’ll be in doubt and any optimism may make you second guess the decision. Then the next phase starts and before you know it things aren’t all that bad and you’re okay with the situation because your mind cannot analyze the gravity of the situation. Then it’s too late for pills.

Infrastructure debt. Now that is a good way of putting it. I was trying to get at that using “social capital bankruptcy” but I think this is better.

My folks were pretty damn selfish. They pushed me to be successful then once I was they dragged me home to care for their oversized life. I got hobbled by their financial shenanigans designed to keep me dependent. Then I had to bail their yacht during the shitstorm using a Dixie cup.

Basically I had to pay the interest on their infrastructure debt.

AnalyticalEngine
Posts: 403
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2018 11:57 am

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by AnalyticalEngine »

Alphaville wrote:
Thu Sep 24, 2020 11:24 am
i’m not sure if this is a universal truth or more a function of late capitalist societies where family relations are more transactional.
Alternatively, late capitalism encourages individuals to pick up more liabilities than they would otherwise. (Clutter, obesity, etc) Family members with high competence are given more incentive/opportunity to leave due to global markets. Thus a kind of braindrain takes place, leaving the existing family members with even more liabilities/infrastructure debt and less competence within their network. Then those who are most competent start to view it as a sinking ship, and trying to leave before the situation drags them down with it.

Alphaville
Posts: 2114
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by Alphaville »

AnalyticalEngine wrote:
Thu Sep 24, 2020 12:13 pm
Alternatively, late capitalism encourages individuals to pick up more liabilities than they would otherwise. (Clutter, obesity, etc) Family members with high competence are given more incentive/opportunity to leave due to global markets. Thus a kind of braindrain takes place, leaving the existing family members with even more liabilities/infrastructure debt and less competence within their network. Then those who are most competent start to view it as a sinking ship, and trying to leave before the situation drags them down with it.
yeah, that’s a good point, my family lived “nuclear” and traveled to various international posts due to my dad’s professional chops.

nevertheless, we kids wanted to be at grandma’s house *all the time* (which annoyed my dad, who i think got jealous, lol). grandparents, cousins, uncles, great uncles, big lunchtime tables, plus the neighborhood... it was a blast.

they had no clutter or obesity. my grandpa beat me at pushups till the end! in retirement he made furniture by hand with no power tools, so he was thin, but kinda ripped.

enigmaT120
Posts: 1212
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 2:14 pm
Location: Falls City, OR

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by enigmaT120 »

I haven't really given this much thought though dementia does run in my family. I think it's interesting that most of the new friends I've made in the past couple of years are Millennials. I don't seem to meet people my own age.

Salathor
Posts: 87
Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2015 11:49 am

Re: Protecting against dementia

Post by Salathor »

jacob wrote:
Tue Sep 22, 2020 3:07 pm
Apparently only the stronger versions. So maybe file this under possible but not plausible.



This was a short term study with finite dose exposure. Dunno about long term bioaccumulation, but I do know that "some people" are popping Benadryl like candy instead of pursuing lifestyle modifications to avoid the allergens, e.g. "cat + many years of daily Benadryl" instead of "no cat".

https://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/news/2 ... entia-risk
When I got on the "self-sufficiency/fire/deliberate living" train, I just quit taking anti-allergy pills. I'd been a one-two a day benedryl user up until I was 25-26 (during the season) because of how bad my allergies were. I just went cold turkey.

There were about two years were I could literally hardly see from eye watering during allergy season before it finally moderated. I still get allergies, but now it's just "vigorous handkerchief use" instead of "nonfunctional, leaking machine".

Post Reply