ffj's early retirement

Where are you and where are you going?
rube
Posts: 663
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:54 pm
Location: Europe (NL)

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by rube »

Good luck. Hopefully things will be better for you soon.

davtheram12
Posts: 65
Joined: Mon May 28, 2018 6:02 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by davtheram12 »

@ffj
Sorry to hear about your dog and extra shit you've been dealing with. My heart aches for you. My wife and I have been dealing with a lot of crap lately and it's really starting to test us.

Glad to have you around and I look forward to more when you've recovered. Rest well ffj :)

ffj
Posts: 2194
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@rube, dav

I thought I had better post before you guys thought my situation dire, but thank you for the kind words. It is very touching.

Without going into too much detail, within literally 15 minutes of finding my dog dead I received a text that my mother had malignant cancer upon seeing her doctor. Needless to say, I was not in the right frame of mind at that time to receive that news, and added to that a couple of days beforehand of some crappy things happening I was ready to check out for a bit and get my head back together.

Now the good news. While I can't bring my dog back, my mother's diagnosis has been greatly improved with the doctors very optimistic they can contain the cancer to a localized spot. They have determined the cancer hasn't spread through numerous scans, which was my main concern, and that surgery followed by a couple rounds of radiation treatments should handle the situation. My parents aren't young, and as a person who is middle-aged, knowing they aren't going to be around much longer places a toll on my mental health. It's a sense of dread that I can't shake.

Anyway, I'm not one to hash over stuff like this so I will leave you with a couple of pictures of my buddy, young and old. Then it's time to start moving on to other subjects again that hopefully you guys find interesting.

Image

Image

EMJ
Posts: 359
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 6:37 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by EMJ »

Is there a new dog on the horizon? If so I hope you find a good buddy to lift your spirits and keep you company.

davtheram12
Posts: 65
Joined: Mon May 28, 2018 6:02 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by davtheram12 »

@ffj
That is a lot to handle! Either situation on its own would be enough to cause anguish. I admire your tenacity.

What a good looking boy! Showed my DW and she agreed :)

Mister Imperceptible
Posts: 1348
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Mister Imperceptible »

Sorry for your loss ffj. My old family dog has kidney failure and arthritis and I probably saw the dog for the last time yesterday.

ffj
Posts: 2194
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@EMJ

Oh yeah, I love dogs. But I'm going to wait until the house is finished as I don't have time to work with a new dog and it's important to start them off correctly, just like kids I guess. I may even get two as we have the land and space for them now.

@dav

Thanks, he was a beautiful dog and I am very partial to hounds.

@MI

I knew he was getting old but I didn't feel he was to that stage yet so it was a bit of a shock. I knew something was wrong when he didn't greet me when I drove up the driveway as he always met me at my truck door to get some ear scratches. I found the poor guy laying on the front porch with rigor already set in so he had died sometime early that day.

I had him cremated and at some point we are going to return him to the earth on the property.

Hope you had some good memories with yours.







O.K. on to some other developments in my life.


By far the largest tree on the new property broke off about twenty feet off of the ground and fell to the ground, taking out three other large trees in the process. This tree is huge, so large I checked to see if it was a state record for a black oak, and now it's reduced to this pitiful sight.

Image

I'm assuming one of our wind storms took it out. I knew it was past its prime but it surprised me in its ability to snap like that as the canopy looked healthy. It's going to take some real work to clean this mess up and a bit of calculation too as there is some massive weight balancing precariously.

What a shame though.


The house work continues. The windows were placed a few days ago by the Amish crew.

[Image

Unfortunately, they were also supposed to install the doors per their contract but they haven't arrived, so the builder took off the price he would have charged. Ideally, I would have waited for them to do both but he was anxious to get this done so he could move on to other jobs. Getting from one place to another is a big deal for them and he just couldn't wait any longer so I will be installing the doors which is not hard but takes time. I would rather have paid him to do it and be done with it.


The roof panels have finally all been installed. This job has been pure misery due to the weather, length of panels, and steepness. Most days this past month have been pushing mid to high 90's F with the heat index. It's even hotter on the roof with the metal reflecting the heat so it has taken an embarrassingly long time to get this done as I couldn't spend much time up there on any given day.

Here is a detail that I had no clue how to do until I got online and researched the steps to get this waterproof. I often joke with my wife that some of the shit I attempt has no forethought other than other people have done it so there must be a way, haha. This took about 3 hours in the hot, hot sun but I thought it turned out nicely.

Image

Here is view of the whole roof.

Image

I still have lots of detail work to do such as installing the rakes and ridge caps, but to give you guys an idea of the look we are shooting for check out this picture.

Image



I am fully prepared to hire out the siding installation as I am ready to get off these ladders and out of the sun. There is a boom of building around here and it is near impossible to find a contractor at a reasonable price, if they are available at all. My last quote for the siding installation was $38,000! That's not a typo but I have one last hope with another Amish guy before I just resign myself to doing the work. Hopefully that works out as I am saving quite a bit of money elsewhere so having someone else do it would be a blessing as I can concentrate on inside work. I have already started the plumbing and should have the vents and drains done soon.

User avatar
jennypenny
Posts: 6544
Joined: Sun Jul 03, 2011 2:20 pm
Location: Stepford USA

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by jennypenny »

I'm really sorry about your dog. It hurts. I'm still not over losing one of mine last year.

I'm glad your mom's prognosis is good. It's a tough time to be dealing with medical stuff.

Kriegsspiel
Posts: 909
Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2012 9:05 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Kriegsspiel »

Pitiful sight? I tend to think that's primeval Appalachia. It was always fun crawling around on big tree trunks in the forest when we were kids.

As far as that complicated roof, I look at that and think of how I'd be just throwing a simple roof on and calling it a day.

horsewoman
Posts: 469
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:11 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by horsewoman »

You could always go with the time honoured tradition of DIY house builders everywhere, and live in an house that's unfinished on the outside for a few years :)

ffj
Posts: 2194
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@jp

Thanks. It could have been much worse for sure. Our family doesn't have great luck with cancer so I was quite relieved it wasn't a worse prognosis.


@Krieg

I need to take a picture of this tree with something for scale. Maybe a banana? :) It is so large that even though there is a tremendous amount of good wood left on the base, I don't think a logger would be able to remove it. You would need an 8 foot bar on the chainsaw just to drop it.

I get what you are saying though, because as a kid this would have been a magnet for me to climb all over.

Simple roofs are boring. All efficiencies in building are boring, hence the need to break up straight lines and plain elevations. Now you can take this too far and make everything too "busy", but there is nothing more drab than a single story ranch style house with no features to draw the eye, unless you want to be completely invisible and indistinguishable, haha.

Same with interior trim. I can make a room pop with tasteful trim details and complementary colors. Or you can paint the walls and ceilings the same color with the only trim being a 3 and a half inch baseboard and 2 and a quarter door trim. Boring. You have to liven it up, even if it's a pain in the ass installing it. Apologies to anyone who likes the minimalist look.


@horsewoman

Haha, we have a neighbor down the road doing just that. It drives my wife crazy every time we pass the house. They installed siding on two sides of their house and simply stopped, with exposed house wrap on the other two sides. It's been this way for almost two years! She hates the way it looks, but I just think of the water damage.

I have already stated that we are not moving until the new house is completely finished. I am not going to work on this thing with furniture and stuff in my way. What a nightmare. Currently I am content in my existing house as the idiot neighbors have calmed down quite a bit for reasons unknown. They even cleaned up their property a little bit although it still looks like shit. Their only brush with the authorities in July was a frantic EMS call that they were all poisoned. I wish I could read the report on that run. I'm guessing the only poison they experienced were the drugs they were ingesting.

Scott 2
Posts: 1520
Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2012 10:34 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Scott 2 »

Asking the important question here - how did the wrong color garage doors conclude?

ffj
Posts: 2194
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@Scott

They haven't.

We called the guys back out and showed them the difference in color from their sample and the actual door, and they agreed it was not the same color. They even compared their latest color sample to the door and it matched our sample but not the doors, so the factory clearly was not synching their colors for whatever reason. We wouldn't have pushed this if the color wasn't so far off, but it doesn't match. They offered us a $150 discount if we accepted the wrong color but again, it is too far off from what we need.

So they contacted the company to replace the doors and assured us that a rep would personally check the color before shipping, but that was three weeks ago. We haven't paid anything for these doors and I'm glad we didn't so as to give us some leverage, but still no doors at this point. The guys that did the work were good guys so I hope their supplier doesn't screw them over.


I went out in the rain today to measure that oak tree that fell out of curiosity. It's a hoss.

Image

I also identified another tree that I hadn't been able to before, a box elder. That puts the number of tree species at 15 so far with several of them representing different varieties, such as the oaks and maples. I let a nice looking poplar be my umbrella while a shower passed over.

Image

This is my latest challenge. Anybody know what kind of tree this is?

Image

Riggerjack
Posts: 2927
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:09 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack »

Can you drag the oak out the woods with a winch? Could a trailer make it back to the downed tree?

If so, maybe talking to the Sawyer you got your previous wood from. Maybe he will saw it up in exchange for some of the lumber. Then you could trim out your house with oak from the land, and save some money.

Or, since your house is coming along so fast, maybe you wouldn't have it dried in time.

Then you can just start stocking your shop... :twisted:

ffj
Posts: 2194
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@rigger

There's a creek between the tree and the pasture so getting a vehicle close to the tree would be difficult, but if a large and long enough winch were available I could snake sections out and cut everything up for firewood. At least the smaller parts.

The main trunk however would require some serious machinery and I'm not so sure it would be worth a sawyer's time as it is so large. I'm going to inquire about that though as it might work out. Most sawmills around here deal with much smaller trees.

I'll let you know what happens.

George the original one
Posts: 5354
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 am
Location: Wettest corner of Orygun

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by George the original one »

You might be able to find someone with draft horses that does logging. Such people typically specialize in extracting logs from selective cut forests.
Amish?

Frita
Posts: 578
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:43 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Frita »

Wishing you and your family gentle days ahead...

theanimal
Posts: 1580
Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2013 10:05 pm
Location: AK
Contact:

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by theanimal »

I'm sorry to hear about your dog and glad your mom has brighter days ahead.

That roof work seems miserable with those conditions. My hat is off to you for working through it yourself. It must be a huge relief

That oak is massive!! We get excited at work (forestry) when we measure trees in southern AK that are 30 inches dbh. Most of the time we are used to dealing with spruce that are 3-7 inches. Very cool.

Hope cooler days and less headaches lie ahead!

mooretrees
Posts: 285
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:21 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by mooretrees »

maybe that is a southern oak, Quercus falcata? Immature trees look different and that one has a few leaves with lobes that made me think oak.

ffj
Posts: 2194
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@George

Possibly a solution. The main prize would be the standing trunk but I just don't know if there is anybody around here that can process such a large tree. I need to make some calls to see if any of this is even an option.

The canopy however, definitely can be cut up and hauled out with some good horses. That's a lot of firewood.


@Frita

Thank you



@animal

Thanks man.

I worked on the roof last night and I almost cried with joy at the temperature and humidity difference. We have a week of moderate weather this week and I plan to do all of the detail work such as the flashing and rakes during this time. It's amazing what a difference tolerable weather makes towards ones attitude and comfort.



@mooretrees

Yes, immature leaf structures can really throw you off. However, while Quercus is a good guess, I am leaning towards pawpaw at the moment. The leaves are just too long but the bifurcation at the tips really has me perplexed. But who knows? It could be a shrub and not even a tree.

One of my great frustrations is trying to research these things and having to deal with page after page of minimal information. Or, like you pointed out, images of just one stage of leaf's life cycle. It's the same issue with mushroom identification, as mushrooms can look dramatically different at various stages of growth.

Ideally, identification guides would have photos AND illustrations of each stage of a plants life cycle, as well of course the elimination guides to narrow the search: leaf type, leaf arrangement, leaf venation, leaf margin, leaf length, leaf shape, etc. I realize many guides attempt this as best they can, but man some of these plants are just hard to identify.

Post Reply