A Journey of Mindfulness--the Remaking of Life in Midstream.

Where are you and where are you going?
Campitor
Posts: 809
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 11:49 am

Re: A Journey of Mindfulness--the Remaking of Life in Midstream.

Post by Campitor » Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:51 am

IlliniDave wrote:
Sat Jul 13, 2019 10:19 am
... then put a pad of pressure treated lumber above the stone, then use concrete blocks to make posts (columns) for the cabin to sit on (similar for the porch column). He says the advantage he's found in that arrangement is when the inevitable shifting does occur over the years, it's a pretty easy setup to adjust/maintain along with it being the most cost-effective...
I can see why he wants to use a pressure treated pad that the concrete blocks will sit on- he can jack up the porch and layer in additional pressure treated "shims" as needed to level the structure. My only concern with this approach is that the pressure treated wood pad. Pressure treated wood is still wood - it soaks up moisture. If the pressure treated wood frequently gets wet and then freezes, it will disintegrate quickly.

There are adjustable pier base products out there than require no shimming - you can adjust the level as needed like this one: https://www.strongtie.com/miscellaneous ... uctDetails. Make sure to click on the "Image & Video Gallery" button and then click the "installation" button to view the various setups that are possible - I think this product will serve your purpose and make leveling more of DIY affair or at least cut down on the subsequent leveling costs if you elect to use a contractor for the adjustments.

IlliniDave
Posts: 2497
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 7:46 pm

Re: A Journey of Mindfulness--the Remaking of Life in Midstream.

Post by IlliniDave » Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:37 am

Campitor wrote:
Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:51 am
I can see why he wants to use a pressure treated pad that the concrete blocks will sit on- he can jack up the porch and layer in additional pressure treated "shims" as needed to level the structure. My only concern with this approach is that the pressure treated wood pad. Pressure treated wood is still wood - it soaks up moisture. If the pressure treated wood frequently gets wet and then freezes, it will disintegrate quickly.
The pads/concrete blocks I think he mainly intends for the main structure, as I've discussed with him raising the cabin another 18" or so above it's present height from the ground. The porch is very small, not much more than a covered stoop so I'm guessing there are any number of simpler solutions if it were the only concern. In general it stays fairly dry under the cabin but you are right that should the pads get repeatedly exposed to water (especially prior to my getting the skirting up)--winter especially with blowing snow. My concern with more more elegant solutions is that I'm not sure what I've got to anchor to (in, actually). The ground where the cabin sits is slightly inclined and beneath is likely to be all manner of things from shallow bedrock to ginormous boulders and such. I think you're in the Northeast IIRC, so maybe the best nearby analog is what you might come across on a lake shore up in Maine. But I'll bring these ideas up with the contractor. Sometimes I think they tend to gravitate to the cheapest options just because that's what most people want to pay. I'm a little more forward looking than many even though it's "just a seasonal cabin".

Thanks!

ETA, the floor beam leveler might be useful in a spot or two where I suspect the floor may be sagging a little, but it's hard for me to know what might be sagging versus heaving. Like I mentioned, this is not an area of competence for me.

Campitor
Posts: 809
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 11:49 am

Re: A Journey of Mindfulness--the Remaking of Life in Midstream.

Post by Campitor » Mon Jul 15, 2019 11:20 am

If there's a shallow large bedrock shelf under the porch, here in New England we drill into the bedrock/granite and epoxy rebar into the hole; we slide a sonotube over it and fill it in with concrete - viola - frost heave footing problem solved. The right type of epoxy needs to be used - it has to have the adhesive strength and properties to bond to the stone. And the hole needs to be cleaned out before inserting the epoxy; several shots of compressed air does the trick.

Sorry for butting into your journal. I just wanted to mention these options so you can pick/research the solution that makes sense to you, fits your budget, and gives you good bang to the buck. Good luck!

IlliniDave
Posts: 2497
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 7:46 pm

Re: A Journey of Mindfulness--the Remaking of Life in Midstream.

Post by IlliniDave » Mon Jul 15, 2019 12:01 pm

Campitor wrote:
Mon Jul 15, 2019 11:20 am
If there's a shallow large bedrock shelf under the porch, here in New England we drill into the bedrock/granite and epoxy rebar into the hole; we slide a sonotube over it and fill it in with concrete - viola - frost heave footing problem solved. The right type of epoxy needs to be used - it has to have the adhesive strength and properties to bond to the stone. And the hole needs to be cleaned out before inserting the epoxy; several shots of compressed air does the trick.

Sorry for butting into your journal. I just wanted to mention these options so you can pick/research the solution that makes sense to you, fits your budget, and gives you good bang to the buck. Good luck!
Thanks, I think under the porch is mostly imported material, it's under the main structure I'm not sure of, and I suspect it might not be consistent. I'll discuss all these ideas with the contractor. Thanks for "butting in". :)

Post Reply