Bhuddist take on Healthcare, Suffering & Death

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classical_Liberal
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Re: Bhuddist take on Healthcare, Suffering & Death

Post by classical_Liberal » Tue May 15, 2018 2:29 pm

The hodgepodge of religious beliefs in the US doesn't surprise me, it's the same for virtually all cultural aspects of the country. Borrow the best from various cultures and make it your own. It's probably one of the major factors which made the US into the empire it is today. Also probably why a highly capitalistic economic system works so well in the US, by it's nature Capitalism provides motive to find various solutions to problems for different types of people. Although this cultural & religious variety has its issues. In particular the lack of a singular defining identity. One could argue this is bad for a nation because single solutions to problems don't work well across the board for the entire populace; like they seem to in more culturally cohesive societies like modern Scandinavia.

Personally, I grew up in a religious household. One of those 63% of evangelicals that believed there is only one path to salvation. By my teen years I had abandoned belief in that system, but at a cost. The myths I grew up with which brought meaning seemed to leave a hole unfilled which I still struggle with today, two decades later. Although I always gave credence to the practice of a region, believing that prayer/medication, etc had practical life improving benefits, I felt the fundamental beliefs and the stories associated with religion were meaningless since they obviously were not fact (I was raised to believe they were). This meant I could meditate or pray, but for no purpose other than self gain. Which seems to inherently miss the point.

Recently I was Introduced to Jordan Peterson in this forum (not to turn this to another JP discussion, it just happens to be relevant), I found his theories regarding religious myths and archetypes as evolved, relevant stories in how to live a good human life very interesting. It may be time to re-investigate the mythos of my childhood region and those of other regions with this new lens. Maybe it's possible to tie them together into a functional approach to religious practice.

In any event, I still find the fundamental religious explanations for evil or suffering problematic. Less helpful in dealing with the day to day personal struggles of life than basic psychology (systematic desensitization, cognitive behavior alteration, etc) or even taking hold of a more stoic philosophical mentality. Perhaps, as I reexplore, they can provide more motivation for personal attempts to alleviate suffering in others. This intern may have other web-of-goal like impacts on personal struggles.

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chenda
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Re: Bhuddist take on Healthcare, Suffering & Death

Post by chenda » Tue May 15, 2018 4:58 pm

@classical_liberal - You might find Kaikhosrov D Irani worth looking up, a late philosopher at city college in NY . He formulated a theory called Domains of Belief which argues that religion meets an essential need for people to seek significance in our existence. There is an excellent interview with him
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FyjL5jfMt8

I came from the reverse position in that I grew up in a somewhat strongly atheist household. When I was about 15 I grew very interested in religion, especially 'alternative religion', and read up on all sorts of interesting sects and cults, but reflexively dismissed them as irrational. 20 years later I've begun to explore it again. Reading some basic philosophy, especially Kantian, first took me to some dark places, but ultimately was helpful in pushing me into a spiritual search. I don't know whether I will ever commit to one path or just carry on with my Zoroastrian-Jain-Sikh hybrid, but for me religion is a private matter, I have no desire as yet to join any kind of group or organisation.

One thing I have learnt is that whilst religion to some extant can provide answers as to meaning and purpose, you have to avoid over-intellectualising. Accepting that there are certain things we can't fully know or understand, at least in this life.

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conwy
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Re: Bhuddist take on Healthcare, Suffering & Death

Post by conwy » Tue May 15, 2018 5:49 pm

chenda wrote:
Tue May 15, 2018 4:58 pm
Accepting that there are certain things we can't fully know or understand, at least in this life.
Agree with this! I'd even prefer to enjoy and revel in the mystery.

classical_Liberal
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Re: Bhuddist take on Healthcare, Suffering & Death

Post by classical_Liberal » Thu May 17, 2018 11:27 pm

@ Chenda
Interesting man and theories. Thanks!

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