Prepping example

What skills to learn, what tools to get
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George the original one
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Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 am
Location: Wettest corner of Orygun

Prepping example

Post by George the original one »

Residents in NE Oregon, if they were experienced living there, would have seen this coming in the 7-day forecast. Less experienced, but observant folks, had a 12-hr window to do what they needed to do. Unfortunately, too many people were probably optimistic about the outcome and we're 48 hours after things shut down. Anyhow, right now the choice is to shelter in place (for weeks!) or take the offer of air evacuation now.

https://katu.com/news/local/residents-i ... -for-weeks

Campitor
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Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 11:49 am

Re: Prepping example

Post by Campitor »

I would recommend evacuating. 3 weeks is an excessively long time to shelter in home unless you’re truly prepared with the required amount of food, the means to prepare the food, the means of handling waste removal like garbage and human waste, and enough water supply for drinking, hand washing, and sponge bathing, etc.

Most folks are not prepared to handle the logistics of survival nor do they factor in unexpected medical conditions that can occur. Better to shelter in an area where modern infrastructure is quickly accessed.

George the original one
Posts: 4914
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 am
Location: Wettest corner of Orygun

Re: Prepping example

Post by George the original one »

"Combined with those made on Friday, Saturday's rescues bring the total of people airlifted to 47 due to flooding in the region."

"13 sought refuge at the Pendleton Convention Center and eight stayed at the Walla Walla Fairgrounds, according to Nadine McCrindle, the executive director of the Central & Eastern Oregon chapter of the American Red Cross."

"Because power is down throughout much of the area, emergency personnel are asking anyone who knows people living in affected areas to attempt contact through text message or Ham radio as soon as possible."

https://www.eastoregonian.com/news/loca ... 2d1c5.html

George the original one
Posts: 4914
Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 am
Location: Wettest corner of Orygun

Re: Prepping example

Post by George the original one »

Campitor wrote:
Sun Feb 09, 2020 1:09 pm
Most folks are not prepared to handle the logistics of survival nor do they factor in unexpected medical conditions that can occur. Better to shelter in an area where modern infrastructure is quickly accessed.
That's pretty straight-forward for the trailer park residents along the river, but the farmers isolated by loss of bridge & landslides have to think of their livestock and financial hardship. They are so rural they are more than likely prepped to handle extended isolation and probably won't leave unless their home is damaged. Power outages in the sticks are common and week-long outages can be expected.

Campitor
Posts: 927
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2015 11:49 am

Re: Prepping example

Post by Campitor »

George the original one wrote:
Sun Feb 09, 2020 2:13 pm
That's pretty straight-forward for the trailer park residents along the river, but the farmers isolated by loss of bridge & landslides have to think of their livestock and financial hardship. They are so rural they are more than likely prepped to handle extended isolation and probably won't leave unless their home is damaged. Power outages in the sticks are common and week-long outages can be expected.
If the farmer is prepared then he's prepared - if not they must evacuate themselves and their farm animals to a safe haven. Cows standing in or near flood waters can get diseases and/or injuries depending on the depth of the water and the debris carried in by the flood.

I understand that evacuating cows in large numbers is next to impossible - sometimes the only choice is to set them loose and hope they can survive until corralled into a safe area.

Flooding and cattle health
Aftermath of the flood – ongoing health issues in livestock

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