Best of the ERE Forum!

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AxelHeyst
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Re: Best of the ERE Forum!

Post by AxelHeyst »

Jacob and 7 on why ERE is resilient against being strung from the lampposts *and* being picked over by the wolves.

AxelHeyst
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Re: Best of the ERE Forum!

Post by AxelHeyst »

The entire thread on End of Life Care. It is full of perspectives that, really, everyone should spend some time with.

I also liked this in particular;

Jacob on how ERE doesn't require more effort than consumer or FIRE lifestyle, just different and more informed. And how that relates to old age care as an EREr.
jacob wrote:
Sat Feb 17, 2024 12:12 pm
Those with higher spending levels (WL4-5) often mistakenly think that lower spending levels require a lot of effort. Why he must be spending 8 hours a day making laundry detergent or cooking lentils. IOW, the belief is that ERE is but replacing one's day job with a lower paying one. What's important to understand is that ERE-living does not require more effort than consumer or FIRE-living but rather a different and more informed effort.

...

In conclusion, I see life as something that winds up and then winds down and where the work required is minimal and the struggle is practically non-existent IF AND ONLY IF a good [lifetime] philosophy is adapted early and followed through with consistently. I think the full version of ERE does that.

jacob
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Re: Best of the ERE Forum!

Post by jacob »

Another thread attempting to explain the various types of freedom-from, especially in the context of ERE City and ERE2:
viewtopic.php?t=13092

AxelHeyst
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Re: Best of the ERE Forum!

Post by AxelHeyst »

A concise masterclass by mF on his arrangement of freedom-to activities that happen to generate incidental income in excess of self-funding level.
mF wrote:I no longer need to work for money, but money can come to me as a side effect of how I want to be spending my time. Darmera and Montology are two lifestyle businesses that I aim to fully express myself through. I do not need a penny from either of them, but they fulfill complementary roles personally and across many forms of capital.

AxelHeyst
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Re: Best of the ERE Forum!

Post by AxelHeyst »

7's visualization of multiplayer WoGs as having relational forms (convexity/concavity) blew my mind this morning:
7Wannabe5 wrote:
Tue Jul 02, 2024 8:19 am
...
Okay, here is the visualization I am now imagining (subject to much future revision.) Each human has their own WOG towards self-actualization. These WOGS may be imagined as formed on half-spheres. A "goal" is inherent of masculine energy, so if you are a human who core, most often, prefers to be in your masculine energy in sexual relationship, then you should approach the other human, assumed to prefer feminine energy in sexual context, with your WOG convex side to her WOG concave side which will be where her underlying preferences/emotions infuse her "being." And, obviously, if you can comprehend this visualization, then you also should possess the ability to undertake this with only spending money to the extent that it is in alignment with your own value structure.

ertyu
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Re: Best of the ERE Forum!

Post by ertyu »

Jennypenny's explanation of how to raise children who launch successfully:
jennypenny wrote:
Wed Jul 17, 2024 4:20 pm
All three of mine are launched now. We gave them each the same amount of money for higher ed to use/stretch as they could. I can see how that might not work with some offspring but mine were raised in the Church of ERE. That said, I don't think 'knowing the value of a dollar' was the key to their launching. Knowing that money is simply a resource, and a limited one at that (like time), helped them to decouple their planning and goal-setting from their educational kitty. It's served them well as adults too.

Getting them to launch didn't require giving them money however. Looking back, and watching what skills they rely upon now, I can see some (mostly accidental) lessons that have served them well ...
  • We taught them to be curious and encouraged them to follow their curiosity. If a kid has no curiosity, it must be really hard for them to figure out what they want study or do for work. We indulged their interests to teach them how one interest (or skill) might lead to another. It's harder than it sounds (like letting dd go to china for a few months at 18 or letting ds use power tools to build things like trebuchets) but it's better than a disconnected teen with no interest in the world.
  • Related, we let them grow up early. We didn't baby them until college and then start trying to teach them how to take care of themselves. By high school they were responsible for their own laundry, some family meals, cleaning their own spaces, budgeting for their own activities, and doing some of the grocery shopping. By 18, they weren't too afraid or lazy to live on their own.
  • OTOH, we never told them they had to leave. They were helpful, functioning adults by 18 so why would I kick them out? :lol: Two left anyway ... one lived in China until covid and now lives with her fiancé, and the other just moved to Nashville after grad school. The third lives here but only because he works 10 minutes from the house. I think by not making college and career talk such a big 'thing' and flattening out the transition, nerves/emotions never got in the way of what they wanted to do.

I think it's silly that we all live in one or two person households anyway ... wastes money and environmental resources. Plus, I can't kick my kids out after HS and then in my 70s say 'I need help, please come back.' A blended house with an open door policy helps everyone out if done right. I see no reason to run kids off the minute they turn 18.


eta: A recent discussion I had with someone illustrated my point about letting them grow up early and flattening the transition ... His kids are preteens. I told him he should start letting his kids start the car, warm it up, work the controls, do the maintenance, etc. He asked why so early. I said because if the first time a kid sits in the drivers seat is the day of their first driving lesson, there's too much to learn and it's too hard to feel comfortable. Ease them into it and make them feel like drivers before they ever have to drive.

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