When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy

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johnsmith84730
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When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy

Post by johnsmith84730 »

When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy
https://www.theatlantic.com/business/ar ... my/534522/

An interesting discussion about the Ju/’hoansi hunter-gatherers of Namibia, and their relationship to time/leisure/quality-of-life and now, money.

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Alphaville
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Re: When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy

Post by Alphaville »

johnsmith84730 wrote:
Tue Apr 06, 2021 5:08 am
When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy
https://www.theatlantic.com/business/ar ... my/534522/

An interesting discussion about the Ju/’hoansi hunter-gatherers of Namibia, and their relationship to time/leisure/quality-of-life and now, money.
hahahahahha the end of the article is the best

thanks for sharing the link

johnsmith84730
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Re: When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy

Post by johnsmith84730 »

Yes... a bit of an unexpected and abrupt conclusion to the article.

sky
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Re: When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy

Post by sky »

200,000 years is a long time. Civilization in the Fertile Crescent (Uruk, Ur, Babylon, Sumeria) is less than 10,000 years, maybe closer to 7,000 years, depending on one's definition of when "civilization" starts.

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Ego
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Re: When a 200,000-Year-Old Culture Encountered the Modern Economy

Post by Ego »

Nǃxau ǂToma, the star of The Gods Must Be Crazy was from that crossroads village, Tsumkwe, Namibia. His real life parallels the Atlantic story.

We stayed in that area and drove across the Caprivi Strip in 2002. The former soldiers were a real problem back then, ambushing and killing people on the road. So much so that the military ran daily private vehicle convoys across the Caprivi to the four-way border between Zimbabwe, Namibia, Botswana and Zambia.

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