Garden Log

What skills to learn, what tools to get
Mikeallison
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Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Garden Log

Post by Mikeallison »

Sclass wrote:
Mon Apr 09, 2018 3:53 pm
I tried some free duckweed but I didn’t like it swirling around...made me nervous. I went down to the garden shop and they had lily pads but they wanted $39 for them. I decided to find some free sources of aquatic plants.
I used to have this stuff in a pond and it grew like crazy https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_moss

Not very pretty, and it likes shade, but it is tough as nails and grows like a weed. I was able to run a fish tank with no media in the filter with it because it was so efficient at using the fish waste for fertilizer. I didn't even have to cycle the tank. It sells in clumps on eBay for a couple bucks. It's one of those things you have to commit to because it is tough to get rid of though.

I'm definitely stealing your filter idea, that makes the whole set up so cheap I really don't have an excuse not to make one.

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Sclass
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Location: Orange County, CA

Re: Garden Log

Post by Sclass »

I got some of this cheap at a flower stand. It grows in water. Now I need to find a tadpole.

Image

And I ordered some seeds for pond lilies. My SO was joking some Chinese ebayer got me for $0.99 magic beans. Maybe.

Image

Mikeallison
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Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Garden Log

Post by Mikeallison »

Can't wait to see the final product, that looks like the lucky bamboo those guys try and sell at the mall for 10 bucks a stalk lol.

George the original one
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Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 am
Location: Wettest corner of Orygun

Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

The potatoes arrived on Wednesday, but it's been far too rainy (8+" in the past week) to get them planted. Fortunately various stuff direct-seeded last week is sprouting. Hmm, not really sure what is what right now because I didn't keep notes!

Bought pepper and tomato plants at the store, started watermelon seeds. Need to get the greenhouse reconstructured soon, though I might hedge by making a coldframe to stash the peppers & tomatoes.

jacob
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Re: Garden Log

Post by jacob »

George the original one wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:43 pm
Hmm, not really sure what is what right now because I didn't keep notes!
Uh oh, that's an indicator that you're entering old [person] age :lol:

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jennypenny
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Location: Stepford USA

Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny »

We finally had a couple of warm days. It was nice to get out into the garden and get my hands dirty. I used to do what needed to be done first, but I'm getting old and selfish. First, I cleaned up the area where I like to have my morning coffee, set out the furniture and put out a pot of pansies. Then I weeded around the fire pit and set it out, along with the chairs and some pots of flowers. There was some time left to clean up the worst of the storm debris from the winter so I didn't completely ignore the mess. It's just that I wanted to be able to enjoy the garden as soon as possible.

I wasn't planning on expanding the garden this year, but the neighbors behind us cut down all of their trees and we lost our privacy. I don't want to pay for a privacy fence so I'm trying to figure out what I can plant along the fence line. I don't like 'landscaping' plants. I tend to stick to ones that attract beneficial insects or ones that produce food of some sort. I also want something that grows as quickly as possible. Gotta give it some thought.

black_son_of_gray
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Re: Garden Log

Post by black_son_of_gray »

@jp - a wall of sunflowers?

J_
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Location: Netherlands/Austria

Re: Garden Log

Post by J_ »

@Jenny, good to read you change to more "good life" than always toiling!
And for privacy: you can perhaps leave the (long ?) border with your neighbor as it is and only make some shrubs around your favorite sitting area. In our little garden we have one tactical placed beautiful evergreen shrub. So that we can be naked kissed by the sun without being seen.

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jennypenny
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Joined: Sun Jul 03, 2011 2:20 pm
Location: Stepford USA

Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny »

I'll have to think about whether I can add privacy around the areas where we sit instead of trying to add privacy to the whole yard. I don't know if I'd risk sunbathing in the nude though ... my dog likes to jump the fence and I wouldn't want to have to go chasing after him in my birthday suit. I'm sure my neighbors would agree. ;)

Maybe a combination of something like the sunflowers along the fence and some strategic shrubbery will work.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

7Wannabe5 wrote:
Wed Mar 28, 2018 10:59 am
Did you trap any wireworms?
2 weeks after the last post regarding wireworms... YES many trapped! I should be planting potatoes this week, so I started pulling up the traps again and most of them had a dozen swarming the bait. Now I'm thinking of delaying potato season until applying beneficial nematodes.

7Wannabe5
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Re: Garden Log

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

@GTOO:

Cool. The weather here has continued terrible with ice storms this past week. Fingers-crossed, I will finally be able to get the party started at both project sites this weekend. Amish shed build up north, and cool crop transplants in urban garden.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

The thing about establishing a new orchard (especially when you try to get fancy with espalier techniques), is that they take time. 3-5 years and sometimes one or two more. Fortunately time is on your side when it comes to fixing pruning boo-boos!

The past couple of gardening sessions have involved stringing the guides for the espalier apple trees. The trees are starting their third season in the ground, so I'm a little late with the espalier support and glad it's done. Branches were tied to the appropriate guide, pruning cuts made as needed, and whole tree sections removed when I broke branches that I thought would bend <ahem>. Well, they have a couple more seasons to get into shape before they're allowed to bear fruit.

Patience. It's all starting to take shape, beginning to look like the picture in my head. I'll add a pair of pear trees next year.

enigmaT120
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Location: Falls City, OR

Re: Garden Log

Post by enigmaT120 »

I'm trying to keep our newer trees small, dwarf sized without the dwarf root stock. I read about the technique in Mother Earth News and bought the book. It's too late for most of my fruit trees. In the meantime, here are some shots from my flower garden:

ImageOrchids by Ed Miller, on Flickr

ImageOrchids by Ed Miller, on Flickr

One is a Calypso orchid, the other some type of coral root orchid. The Calypsos are really spreading in my woods. I guess they approve of my forest management.

George the original one
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Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 am
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

enigmaT120 wrote:
Mon Apr 30, 2018 10:56 pm
I'm trying to keep our newer trees small, dwarf sized without the dwarf root stock.
Yeah, I'm definitely not a fan of dwarf root stock, though I like semi-dwarf.

Never thought to plant orchids. Yours look very nice!

Mae
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Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 3:44 am
Location: Belgium

Re: Garden Log

Post by Mae »

The weather has been getting better and better. Looks like no more nights below freezing. So ... I have taken up (apartment) gardening as a hobby, huzzah! Starting small with this arugula sprouted from seed.

Image

enigmaT120
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Location: Falls City, OR

Re: Garden Log

Post by enigmaT120 »

Ha George, I didn't plant those orchids. They are very difficult to propagate. Mine are just spreading naturally.

George the original one
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Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 am
Location: Wettest corner of Orygun

Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

Planted corn back on Wednesday. Earliest I've ever bothered planting corn, but the 10-day forecast looked hopeful & I'm "cheating" by using a large sheet of black plastic to help warm the soil.

Also planted beets, more lettuce, and more green onions.

***

On the wireworm front, I applied beneficial nematodes about a week ago. Can't say the results are all that good, but it was only one application. A few smaller wireworms died, but when I tilled pathways to clear weed seedlings yesterday, I stared at how many big, lively wireworms were scrambling for cover. 65F soil temperatures are not enough to make them lively, but 75F soil temperatures (60F-65F air temp) show that they can be very active. Consequently I've ordered another shipment of beneficial nematodes and will apply them on a warm evening right after tilling. [note: that's warm for my climate, not what most people would consider warm, LOL!]

Reading a bit more on wireworm problems gave me another suggestion on how to deal with them. Highest activity levels are April-May and September-October, so planting potatoes in late June is better than planting in April. Apparently the wireworms burrow deeper into the soil to seek cooler temperatures. Holding off planting my spuds now... looks like they'll be well-chitted!

Flooding fields worked in some locales while drying fields out worked in others. The idea is to set conditions to the opposite of what is normal for the habitat. Since I live in the land of rain, where rain storms bring 4"-6" per day in the winter for up to a week, it would seem I should seek to dry the soil.

Mae
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 3:44 am
Location: Belgium

Re: Garden Log

Post by Mae »

I'd like to recycle used coffee grounds for my garden. From what I've read, used coffee grounds have a neutral pH. Does anybody have any experience with this?

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jennypenny
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Location: Stepford USA

Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny »

We're hurriedly getting the garden planted before we head out to DD's graduation this week (one off the dole!). We aren't expanding this year since we're working on some indoor projects. It will all be in by Wednesday ... tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, and herbs. I have two full beds of tomatoes since I like to grow a large variety. It will include German Johnson, Brandywine, Purple Cherokee, beefsteak, big boy, Rutgers, and sun gold. I added a bigger variety of cherry and I'm not growing Roma this year. I didn't use them like the others. I'm doing more basil this year because I never have enough and I'm trying Thai Basil. We're also doing a small section with hot peppers. (Ten bucks says my dopey dog will eat the hottest one and cost me a trip to the vet.)

The wildflowers didn't reseed as hoped. I'm trying to decide if I want to reseed every year or plant perennials. I'm considering expanding the herb garden into that area instead.

In better news, the strawberries are doing great. I think I've finally figured out where they are happiest in the yard. They are full of blooms already. This is year 3 since planting and they look great and have filled out the bed.

We love the fire pit area we put in last year and use it all the time. It's so relaxing to sit out there with a drink. It's also a nice way to get rid of my junk mail. :)

I'll take pics when everything is in. It won't be that impressive this year but I'll enjoy it just the same.

Mae
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Location: Belgium

Re: Garden Log

Post by Mae »

jennypenny wrote:
Sun May 06, 2018 4:06 pm
The wildflowers didn't reseed as hoped. I'm trying to decide if I want to reseed every year or plant perennials. I'm considering expanding the herb garden into that area instead.
That's a pity. Wildflowers are beautiful!

Good luck with your garden.

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