classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Where are you and where are you going?
niemand
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Jan 03, 2016 3:18 am
Location: Woop Woop, Australia

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by niemand » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:22 pm

Gee, same here. I’ve been googling pathways into nursing in Australia here for the last two evenings. Very cool journal by the way, really like your story. Keep on posting!

slowtraveler
Posts: 784
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:06 pm

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by slowtraveler » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:48 am

It sounds like life has been great for you now. I admire that set up of yours. Good luck with the new housing. I wouldn't stress on the crusier purchase. It has many benefits and $80 isnt the end of the world or financially taxing by any means. Congrats on lasting so long with the no new things rule. Journals like yours remind me of how much I've loosened up and how much I could tighten if I really needed to.

7Wannabe5
Posts: 5113
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:03 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:49 am

Congratulations! The upside of intermittent full-time is that it does have some of the same psychological effect as "back to school." The summer seems like a time apart compared to continuous very part-time employment.

classical_Liberal
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 6:05 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by classical_Liberal » Sat Jun 29, 2019 4:03 am

6/30/2019
With Semi-ERE nearing, I figured I should do a financial update. To give my future self, and any interested parties, an idea of the final finances just prior to Semi-ERE jumping off point. At this point I can accurately provide numbers because all additional job earnings will go into my operational fund (aka checking account), which I have never included in FI numbers. It will cover my transition for the remainder of 2019.

At time of semi-ERE:
12 mo rolling spend: $17,645
WR based on 12 mo rolling: 5.6% (or 17.8yrs)
I anticipate net income of about 45K annually from my initial half time set up.

The Semi ERE Charts:
I’ve narrowed things down to the following three charts. Together they represent essentially everything important.

As you can see from the first, I’ve moved well over the yellow line, which represents money needed for old age retirement. Ideally, my net worth will never drop too far below that line, although I have 20 years for potential growth.
Image

In the second, we see a YMOYL chart using historical success rates. Currently I look at the 100% number as a max spending level for FI. This is a bit of a judgment call based on current asset valuations. I include the 80% number, as the situation could change. If CAPE were 20 and 10 yr treasuries yielding 4-5% again, I may feel more comfortable using the 80% number. Either way, they assume I get 50% of my Social Security benefit at age 67.
Image

The third represents cash flow. Ideally my cash flow will stay positive, although I can certainly tolerate some years of negative without fear of going broke.
Image

Semi ERE spending:
I have hoped of reaching a 12K annual spend. The reasons are threefold: I believe that to be the lowest spending at my current skill level that will allow my current lifestyle. It’s just below the US poverty level for one person. That is a bit below the amount of spending allowed for in the YMOYL chart, making me FI.

Sadly, I’m a bit worried that the high income levels associated with half-time work may actually be counterproductive to expense reduction. It’s always been a theory/project and I felt I needed some motivation to get there. If I were to jump without the income parachute, I would be extremely motivated, but I’m not. Such is life. I still want to set up my semi-ERE living situation so that this level of spending is possible, because I feel it's a worthwhile pursuit. So I have. Below is sample spending for the situation in new home base city:

Housing/utilities/Phone: $350
Food/personal care/household: $200
Transportation: $100
Healthcare: $100 (this assumes I’m lucky enough to maintain current health)
Entertainment/Travel: $250
Total of $1000 mo or $12,000 annual.

Obviously entertainment and travel is the place where there would be flexibility if other, more emergent needs arose.

Here are the ad-ons I’ve been running which bring me to my current spend rate:
+$150 Food
+$100 Work (price of licenses, scrubs, equipment, costs associated with frequent moving)
+$100 Transportation (eventual replacement for current vehicle)
+$200 Entertainment/Travel
$1550 mo or $18,600 annual.

I’m using this first year or two to try to find a balance in spending. I’m really not sure where it will go with this extra free time. I certainly do not intend to become wasteful and lazy, yet at the same time I may end up feeling the price of some things worth it in the travel and hobby realm. In any event, this period will be the experimental evidence to my previous theories. Time will no longer be an issue or excuse. With a the nice cash flow buffer my half time position provides, there is no better time to run this experiment. Ultimately, I want to find balance between the benefits productive (ie paid) work provides and optimal spending. If the two do not naturally sync, I will either end up very rich, or I will end up spending a bit more than optimal time in money producing actives to trade for deliberate, purposeful, life enhancing spending.

To everyone who has posted since my last update, I deeply appreciate all of the thoughts and congratulatory statements! I truly offer a heartfelt thanks to you all for helping me through my journey detailed in this journal. I can say with certainty, I would not be where I am today if not for your participation here and in this forum in general.

Jin+Guice
Posts: 436
Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2018 8:15 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by Jin+Guice » Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:05 pm

Congratulations on hitting the ERE w/ 50% of SS benchmark and quitting your full-time job. I realize I'm about a month late to comment on a position it sounds like you've decided to take, but I'm going to offer a dissenting view anyway.

I think 6 months of full-time work is too much. You don't seem happy nursing full-time and I think you're giving up hard earned freedom for the allure of more dollars. It does seem like you want to try out the half year thing, so in that regard I'd encourage you to go for it. Part-time work is categorically different than full-time work. I get the impression that you still kind of like nursing, and I think doing 1-2 days a week might rekindle your passion for it. You just seem so utterly burned out. It's also my opinion that part-time work is better than full-time work and that full-time work is akin to modern slavery. I think working full-time is totally untenable and I don't know how anyone does it. I'm willing to accept that personalities are different and some people prefer working full-time and then being off full-time. I won't believe you don't prefer part-time work until you've given it a real try though.

As everyone else mentioned, if you refuse the offer it's unlikely to be presented to you again, so trying it is likely the best option. The danger here is ending up trapped by habit and a false sense of obligation. It's easy before you do something to think "if this doesn't work out, I'll just stop." One of the many lessons I've learned the hard way is that the weight of what we are doing is far greater than the things we could have done but didn't. We end up doing things for far longer and under far more miserable conditions than we ever thought we would when we started, simply because we are already doing them.

I'm interested to see what you find in your 6 months off. To me, you so clearly need a massive period of decompression that I wouldn't be surprised if you don't end up doing much during some or most of those 6 months. Eventually, as a motivated and skilled person, you are much more likely to find opportunity around every corner than you are to end up starving in the street or watching reruns of Jersey Shore all day.

fingeek
Posts: 89
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 8:16 am
Location: South Wales

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by fingeek » Thu Jul 04, 2019 2:25 pm

This is awesome, congrats! I will humbly submit that you might be in a bit of a state for a good few months if you are coming down from a high pressure/burnout type position, and/or if you don't have a solid idea of what you'll get up to in your time off. I believe it's all positive stuff though - We have to go through the shit to clear it off and come out as a fresh new person.

I hope you at least get through the 6 months finding some new hobbies, and not resenting going back to work at that point because it was too early - Sounds like you have all the cards lined up the right way though. Good luck and keep us posted!

classical_Liberal
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 6:05 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by classical_Liberal » Fri Jul 05, 2019 2:04 am

fingeek wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 2:25 pm
I will humbly submit that you might be in a bit of a state for a good few months
Thanks for the wisdom. I think this may be the case, but I'm not sure how it will all work itself out. The best I've done while in this profession is a month long break. When I've gotten those rare opportunities, I feel like a have to compress a bunch of things I want to do into that short time period. So, I end up very busy. I think that may happen initially with semi-ERE too, but I hope it will slow down quickly.
fingeek wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 2:25 pm
and not resenting going back to work at that point because it was too early
I really worry about this with the half time set up. I'm not sure how to handle it though. You're about six months in right now, right? How are you feeling? although you have a new child too, no? I imagine that's taking up quite a bit of time and energy.

@Jin+Guice
I always appreciate your dissenting views. I hope all is going well for you!
Jin+Guice wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:05 pm
I think 6 months of full-time work is too much. You don't seem happy nursing full-time and I think you're giving up hard earned freedom for the allure of more dollars... You just seem so utterly burned out.
I think you are absolutely correct in the above assessment. At this point 6 months is too much, and I am more burnt out than I think. The GF and a couple close friends see it in me more than i do in myself. Plus, I had a crappy shift recently (ie hospital ridiculousness) and the burn out really started to come through. Still, 6 months is better than 12, and knowing I have this high pay to come back to is really helping me psychologically to make that leap. Like @fingeek pointed out above, there is the chance I may just not be ready to go back and end up walking away from the profession after another stint.
Jin+Guice wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:05 pm
The danger here is ending up trapped by habit and a false sense of obligation. It's easy before you do something to think "if this doesn't work out, I'll just stop." One of the many lessons I've learned the hard way is that the weight of what we are doing is far greater than the things we could have done but didn't.
This is an excellent realization, and something I'm guilty of in the past. It is probably the single biggest risk I'm taking. No matter what happens I'm going to work at least one more 3 month contract. I just need to try this set-up out. After that though, If I'm just not feeling it anymore, I need to stay firm in my resolve.

It's kind of been assumed on here, I'd do 6 months on and 6 off, but that's not how it has to go down. I can chop it up into 4 three month segments, or 5-3-1-3, or whatever. I'm hoping this flexibility will allow me to maintain enough control to avoid over-doing it in any given period of time. I do realize one day a week work is different in kind than all on and all off. Assuming this attempt doesn't work, I'm still willing to give that a try with hospital nursing at a later date. For now, I'm just really looking forward to "Summer Vacation", as @7WB5 describes it.

fingeek
Posts: 89
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 8:16 am
Location: South Wales

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by fingeek » Fri Jul 05, 2019 3:55 pm

I've just ticked over 5 full months. I felt extremely burnt out coming into my "test FIRE" year. I can say at this point the burnout has practically gone, and I just have slight "echoes" of it every now and then. I'm actually starting to look forward to going back to work at this point, and a slight level of boredom is creeping in. I'm still fairly exhausted but I put that down to baby.

For the first two months or so I felt like I was in "catch-up mode". I used to say to my wife "I'm going to do some work now" while referring to every day stuff. After she pointed this out, I reframed my language and stopped that, and I no longer felt like I was in catch-up mode. Then, like peeling the onion, I found some deeper bits of pain to try and work through.

If I was in your position, I would feel optimistic that the majority of my burnout would go by 6 months, especially if you're planning exercise, getting out, mindfulness and other such goodies. I'd definitely take an extended initial break and go cold turkey rather hope that shorter intervals cure the burnout

Augustus
Posts: 892
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:15 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by Augustus » Tue Jul 09, 2019 6:04 pm

So are you taking 6 full months off then? What's the plan? I'd do 6 months personally, if you're like me you'll become a real person again around the end of month 2.

classical_Liberal
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 6:05 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by classical_Liberal » Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:33 am

@fingeek
Thanks for the info, anecdotal data points really help.

@Augustus
That's a good question. At this point I'm considering it open ended, but I will be off at least through thanksgiving. The GF and I always take a holiday road trip to see both of our families. After that, I'm not sure. I do know that after a month off before my currently placement, I felt pretty good about work for the first two or so months. I remember writing here that work felt like a "workout", in that I didn't really look forward to it, but I felt pretty good during and afterwards. Now, about 4.5 months in, I'm burnt to a crisp and hate it again. So, although I don't have any data points for more time off in between, I do know that more than three months at a time with only a month off sucks. With that in mind, I really don't want to put myself in a situation where I have to do more than three months at a stretch, without significant time off in between. I'd hate to take a full six off, then be forced to work six straight if I wanna keep my gig. Again, maybe with more time off i'll find more straight time at work is better, but I'd rather err on the side of caution with that. So, I think i'll keep at least one month of off time "in reserve", to take between just in case.

The other problem is more of a type II error issue. Even though I really enjoyed my first couple of months back, I certainly did not want to go back after a month off. So, even though it was good for me, I didn't "feel it" as far as being ready to go back. And it was good for me. Those first few months I was also at my most productive in personal life. I learned to bake, started cutting my own hair, and started research on wanting to buy a bike (which is currently my favorite hobby). At this point though, I have absolutely zero energy for new things, thanks to work exhaustion.

The whole thing is going to be a balancing act, it may take a couple of attempts to get it correct. After a couple of tries though, if it ain't working, I'm throwing in the towel with the arrangement.

_______

A general update. I've found myself focusing on my leisure/hobby activities lately. There have been some threads about spending and the like, which made me realize I spend more money on those activities than any other budget item. This has led me to the realization, I never really thought about productive ways to structure my hobbies. Once I have a bit more time, this is going to be a major project. Eliminating this "line item (or even significantly reducing it) would make me FI. I feel like I have to, in the very least, give this a shot. ERE thinking has led to amazing progress in the housing, food and transportation realm. Even though it seemed difficult at first, I'm very close to ERE spending with those things, and I do not feel any deprivation. Maybe I can structure my leisure/hobbies the same way. Obviously others have managed to do so.

horsewoman
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:11 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by horsewoman » Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:00 pm

classical_Liberal wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:33 am
Maybe I can structure my leisure/hobbies the same way. Obviously others have managed to do so.
To me it seems full time work creates a mental barrier between work and play. I have been on the part time track for almost 12 years now, and in that time l

- outfitted my sewing room with pro equipment by sewing for other people
- outfitted my hobby of photography by opening an online shop where I sold handmade fabric items
- financed my two horses with caring for other peoples horses and
- bought my pretty expensive instruments by playing/singing for other people.

I do none of these things commercialy at the moment, but I have top of the line equipment for all my hobbies. I could never have done all that while working full time.
Actually, I couldn't even have imagined 15 years ago how rich my life would become by "depriving" myself of full time income.

This process takes some time but I'm sure you'll experience something similar.

jacob
Site Admin
Posts: 11323
Joined: Fri Jun 28, 2013 8:38 pm
Location: USA, Zone 5b, Koppen Dfa, Elev. 620ft, Walkscore 73
Contact:

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by jacob » Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:23 pm

+1
I've bootstrapped a few hobbies this way rendering them effectively free and turned one into a salary. Also see ERE book 5.1.1 (A modular design).

fingeek
Posts: 89
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 8:16 am
Location: South Wales

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by fingeek » Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:40 pm

horsewoman wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:00 pm
To me it seems full time work creates a mental barrier between work and play.
Very much found this too. Work can consume your mental time and leave none for hobbies and life outside work. It's something I've learnt fairly hard this year while being off, and I intend to make sure that when I go back to work I don't let work take my full mental time... Tips welcome!

classical_Liberal
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 6:05 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by classical_Liberal » Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:54 pm

Thanks all for the feedback. Some great stuff. I'm reading three basic principles here, also from posts in the blog and book. 1) Pick free hobbies/leisure, 2) Choose hobbies in which costs can be "recycled" into new hobbies later, through reselling or modularity. 3) Learn to monetize the hobby/leisure to the extent it pays for itself, so it must provide value to others or value to me in some other realm.

The first seems simple enough. I've done this to some extend, this seems to be a Wheaton 4 idea. Although there is room for improvement here.

The second is more Wheaton 5-6. I can't say I've been able to accomplish this to any degree. I still view investments in hobbies as sunk costs. This comes from my fickle tenancies. In the past I can't tell you how many times I got really excited about something, then spend several hundred dollars on needed equipment, and ended up not using it a year later. I think progress here can be make through choosing to improve skill over "equipment". Then, if I persist in the activity, invest in the best, so that it has resell or multipurpose value. Like with my biking, start very cheap, then if I continue buy a top of the line used bike that could either be resold if I bore of it, or double as transportation (ie replace car) for longer term trips.

The third seems Wheaton 6-7+. Although I've had paying jobs before that I enjoy to varying degrees, there has always very much been a "separation of church and state" mentality wrt work and play. I theoretically realize that for some this distinction is very blurred, but have never truly made an attempt. My aversion is partially the worry that attempting to monetize a fun pleasure-type activity would suck the joy from it. This is partially because I tend to have a depressive personality, very much existentialist. When I do find something I love, adding order, deadline requirements, measurements, or whatever, seems to ruin it for me. I hate to risk losing joy in an activity, particular since it is hard to find and tends to fade over time anyway. So I'd be very interested to hear how you folks have managed to balance that aspect.

steveo73
Posts: 1191
Joined: Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:52 pm

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by steveo73 » Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:32 pm

classical_Liberal - your post here on hobbies is exactly what I just posted about on a different journal. I'm also wary about monetising a hobby. I also agree with not picking a hobby that is expensive but I don't mind paying for hobbies that I enjoy if I have to pay for it.

I play guitar for instance but I don't pay for a guitar teacher or upgrade guitars however I do jiu-jitsu and I can't do that for free.

horsewoman
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:11 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by horsewoman » Fri Jul 12, 2019 1:26 am

classical_Liberal wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 8:54 pm
The third seems Wheaton 6-7+. Although I've had paying jobs before that I enjoy to varying degrees, there has always very much been a "separation of church and state" mentality wrt work and play. I theoretically realize that for some this distinction is very blurred, but have never truly made an attempt. My aversion is partially the worry that attempting to monetize a fun pleasure-type activity would suck the joy from it. This is partially because I tend to have a depressive personality, very much existentialist. When I do find something I love, adding order, deadline requirements, measurements, or whatever, seems to ruin it for me. I hate to risk losing joy in an activity, particular since it is hard to find and tends to fade over time anyway. So I'd be very interested to hear how you folks have managed to balance that aspect.
There is no denying that monetizing your hobbies takes the fun out of them, but I am now in a position to tell you - it is only temporary.

My sewing business (est. 2010) started to bore me as I had to reproduce similar items all the time to keep costs low (time for photography, and listing the items is of course a lot less if one makes the same item a few times.) The sales started to peter out in 2014 due to my lacking engagement. I closed my shop in 2016 and did not even look at a sewing machine for months. But of course I still have all my high quality machines, paid for by my shop. Today I sew almost every day again, little odds and ends for our house, mending and alterations. I really enjoy it, not least because of my super cool gear ;)

In 2012 I picked up a new instrument and since I was only working part-time I was able to put in the hours to become proficient fast - I ended up in a band with well paying gigs after a year. Might be due to some lucky breaks, but I do not really believe in luck. Being lucky is a combination of being prepared and having your eyes wide open to take up opportunities (recommend reading: The Luck Factor by Dr Richard Wiseman).

Fast forward five years and lots of earned money with music (I invested most of it in gear and a top-of-the-line instrument I could never have afforded otherwise) - I became fed up with the money making aspect, turned even down a chance to "hit it big" because I could not sell myself in this way. So I joined a no-profit band where all proceeds are spent for flyers, equipment so on, but there is no focus on making money. It's a hobby band, and I really enjoy that. Of course I still have the skills and the option to make some money playing and singing on my own, and indeed I do 3 or 4 solo wedding gigs a year (using my old contacts) to keep even. I do not enjoy those gigs (I'm not a solo musician, never will be), but people are willing to book me so I suck it up "for the money".

When it comes to horses, I thoroughly burned out by caring for other peoples horses. In this case I was not able to "pull the plug" in a timely fashion, and I was at a point of giving up riding completely (I ride horses since the age of 8!). We made too much money with this to quit it willy-nilly, and the end was very painful for all parties involved. But - you know what - 5 months after I kicked out our last boarder I got myself a brand new young thoroughbred horse and have been training him happily ever since. The burn out was fierce, but in the end very short, same for my husband. We even talk about taking in 2 boarding horses in a few years again (with lessons learned!) to offset costs. I suppose if you really love something you will go back, even if some bad stuff happens.

I've written you a small novel with my experiences, and of course I know that everyone is different. But since I have run through this process you worry about recently I hope my experiences are helpful to you. I would not recommend to monetize a hobby so much that you make serious money (like we did with our horse keeping). This muddies up the lines too much, at least for me. But make just enough money to pay for related costs and you will probably be fine.

classical_Liberal
Posts: 994
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 6:05 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by classical_Liberal » Tue Aug 06, 2019 11:50 am

@horsewoman and @steveo73
Thanks for the responses wrt hobbies. It reads like I should probably avoid becoming too dependent on any income that a hobby generates. Particularly if it requires regular input from me, as then it can become too much like a job. If it comes about on it's own, from things I enjoy, I should be vigilant in maintaining boundaries with what I agree to do.

UPDATE 8/6/2019
Well, the semi-ERE checklist has been completed, except I need a few more continuing education hours to renew my nursing license. I technically have until the end of the year for that, and now that I'm remaining a part of the hospital system, there are plenty of free classless available to me, so not too concerned.

The GF and I just competed a move into the initial home base city. A slight modification in that it ended up being Fargo, ND vs St Cloud, MN. Fargo is a similar college town about 2.5 Freeway hours NW of St Cloud. This decision evolved because the GF picked up a contract here and really enjoys it. Evidently the surgeons here love her, so she'll have to ability to extend her contract at will. Also, both of our best friends kind of randomly ended up in this town, at least temporarily. So it's really great from a social angle for both of us. From a COL, lifestyle, and climate perspective Fargo is very similar to St Cloud. It's very bikable, a smaller downtown with plenty of collegiate level entertainment on the cheap. It's really a great place to be April through October, the winter gets old, but with our plans to slow travel, we should get away enough to not feel trapped. The apartment we leased for the next 12 months will end up about $550 ($275 each) mo for everything. Can't beat the price and it checks off all the GF's requirements. From my standpoint, it's less than a mile from many parks/river and downtown, a couple miles from three different universities and libraries, a mile for GF's work and mostly bikable for daily errand stuff.

The downside of new location is I'm no longer within mass transit/easy commute to Minneapolis. Although I have a couple friends and a couple family members who live in the Twin Cities, so I always have a place to stay overnight if I want to partake in more urban activities. Which is exactly what we did last weekend. Met up with some friends of mine in Minneapolis, along with my best friend and his DW and went to the Valley Fair Amusement park. I hadn't been there in at
least 10 years, but we all had a great time. I know, I know, not ERE entertainment, but at least we all got my friends military discount prices. The second night we spent with my mom and her husband which also went very well. Sometimes we have had issues getting along. This is one of a few relationships I wish to rekindle with more free time and this first attempt went so well, they intend to visit us next month.

I think setting up home base, and the associated move, was really stressing me out. Now that a decision is made, and we are set up here, I'm feeling much more relaxed with the first phase of Semi-ERE. As of today I have five weeks until my FT work ends and have some significant downtime. I took time off at the beginning of my last contract for this move, etc. So was off last week and the remainder of this week, so I'm sure that has something to do with the relaxed feeling as well. I do have some, deeper, underlying anxiety about the whole thing, this is a big step for me. However, the excitement for time off is overwhelming the anxiety for the time being.
Last edited by classical_Liberal on Tue Aug 06, 2019 9:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bigato
Posts: 2126
Joined: Sat Mar 05, 2011 12:43 pm

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by bigato » Tue Aug 06, 2019 1:24 pm

Wow, that sounds like a really great place to live!
I hear you on the anxiety. Mine may be clouding my excitement.

Smashter
Posts: 316
Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2016 8:05 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by Smashter » Tue Aug 06, 2019 2:24 pm

Awesome progress! Can't beat living near close friends.

What kind of setup do you have for $550? That is so dang cheap, I'm jealous.

2Birds1Stone
Posts: 765
Joined: Thu Nov 19, 2015 11:20 am

Re: classical_Liberal's Semi-ERE

Post by 2Birds1Stone » Tue Aug 06, 2019 8:52 pm

Amazing update. Really happy you've found a home base, and lookin forward to seeing how you do in this next chapter. Hoping for more regular updates as you don't have the craziness of moving and work to deal with.

Post Reply