An American Millennial

Where are you and where are you going?
Scott 2
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Scott 2 »

A couple thoughts on the tracking. I entered into marriage 100% committed to separate accounts:

1. Personal capital will let you split a transaction

2. Even if you are keeping accounts separate, consider aggregating the household into a single tracker. This resolved a bunch of the weird tracking issues for us.

3. Following this, don't worry about balancing the small stuff. Err on the side of paying more than you "fair" share. You are earning well, it's going to be enough. Chasing the details (say $100 either way) isn't worth the stress.

4. You don't have enough pre-martial money where, if marriage in the cards, paying careful attention to separate accounts will matter. Especially with kids, it's all going to be marital assets anyways. Keeping his and hers in the eyes of the law, for post-marriage earnings, is difficult.


A couple thoughts on the spending:

1. As income increases, if you focus on keeping the small leaks plugged, you'll miss the chance to catch bigger streams. Raise your threshold for what is worth attention. Better to spend an extra $5k this year and move life forward full bore, IMO. You could easily capture that money and then some via another raise.

2. I'd focus on lifestyle design over budgeting, with a high savings rate being an emergent property. Reaching FIRE in 10 years, with something really good to transition to is much better IMO, than reaching FIRE in 5 with minimal plan.

3. It's probably not realistic to think that if your girlfriend is still working, that you'll just stop and do whatever you want. Household obligations will rebalance upon the event, in my experience. It's also likely you can massively accelerate her time frame by continuing to work for another year.

4. I like the side gig exploration, not for the income, but for early consideration of what FIRE might look like. That's a great idea.

5. The evaluation of children based on price per head makes me a little nervous. Get some time around new parents before you commit. Have candid conversations with the fathers, with no mother or children present. Understand the odds and impact of unhappy paths (fertility issues, miscarriage, health issues). Even in the happy path, it changes everything. I've had guys tell me things like:

*I wouldn't do it over again* - father of a 3 and 5 year old, while the kids were playing in the yard - he later divorced
*I talked to a divorce lawyer years ago, but couldn't afford to leave* - the very tired father of a couple teenagers
*It's barely worth it, like 51% good vs 49% bad* - a father who was almost done raising his teenager, then had a surprise baby

I'm happily child free and carry a bias. But IMO, you have to really want it, to enjoy it. I don't know any parents who have avoided their entire lives revolving around work and children. It closes a bunch of doors.

Hristo Botev
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Hristo Botev »

Well, re (5), as the father of an 8 yo and 10 yo: I wish I'd had more; I wish I'd started earlier; I can't imagine not having them (they are a constant reminder that my life isn't about me); for me it's been closer to 100% good and 0% bad. I've also never understood the idea of married people having separate accounts. But take all this with the background that I'm coming at this from the perspective of a Catholic that thinks the whole point of marriage is procreation.

jacob
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by jacob »

viewtopic.php?p=179183#p179183 says that each child costs 30% of a single adult (head of household). Adult partner costs 50% of that. Thus, one child adds 0.3 to 1.5 to get 1.8 or 0.3/1.5 = +20%.

In short, add 20 years times your current spending times 20% + whatever extra thneeds you want.

I'm sure it's possible for some to get that figure to become 250k or 1M. Indeed, if a couple is currently spending 250k/year---and it's not hard to imagine THAT demographic---that would be the result. Likewise, 250k is the result insofar the couple currently spends ~60k per year. Of course, as much as half the population somehow manages to spend less than that.

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

I DONT EVEN KNOW IF I CAN ERE, honestly. The times I've been unemployed... Or comfortable... I've got a real problem applying myself. I probably couldn't make it, honestly. Part of me thinks I'd lose it EREing. Best to have kids so I have something to chase... besides the dollar, or my own pleasure. ENTJs are a funny case, if you've ever read about them. I'm a funny case, if you've ever read about me... Feel like a pile of wasted talent, lol. I get people.. I can make decisions (though INTJs, with all the reflection, can make better decisions than me... but I can also blow up your confidence in your carefully planned plans with a small, stream-of-consciousness criticism). ENTJs are also known for arrogance.

I read a funny thing following MBTI memes on Instagram. I know they're for shits and giggles, but I guess there's like a rich ENTJ stereotype. Like we just can't help ourselves.

Take this thought exercise for example. I can do all my work for the week in 8 hours. EASILY. My job is designed for this. Why? Because other software teams have 5 people doing what I do. So $$/hour... how do you incentivize that? Well you don't. It's still faster, even at my pace. Small-scale so oversight, optimization, tests, etc aren't as important (/impactful). We don't have those concerns. So let's say instead of blowing up my task list on Mondays, I work 1-2 hrs/day during the week.

What do I do with the rest of my time? I LOVE your couples tracking tips @SCOTT btw, and I'm gonna take some of them on, and will post which ones don't apply and why later. And will post what worked for us end of December. But, actually, question, Personal Capital splits an expense... but I also SPLIT AN EXPENSE when I put it in my Google Sheets, so that's not going to make me switch. These big websites.... I have to do UX/UI design at my job, since it's a 1.5-person dev team right now... Some of these big websites are TERRIBLE. Especially in the finance realm. I know Mint is known for terrible UI (yes, it's more than useable, that doesn't make it good)... but I think my apps better fit my user than Mint fits me...

But what do I do with my time now, with this amazing WLB (work life balance)? Play a lot of DND (4/week now, 1 as DM, and 3 as player for fun and insights), watch some TV when I get frustrated with LOL or when hanging out with my gf... Like... I'm in the same situation I was pre-DEVELOPER VIKTOR K.

ertyu
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by ertyu »

When faced with periods of time to fill in a butt-must-stay-behind-desk situation, I usually read or listen to podcasts. What is jumping at me as missing in this wlb picture you've painted is intellectual development of some sort. You could also give advice to others on stackexchange or similar; my friend who is in IT was telling me that a profile on stackexchange that demonstrates expertise and appears to have been useful to others is actually a huge asset when they're considering hiring. You could use the period to develop and participate in online communities around your interests. Or to acquire background knowledge for meatspace projects that require you to work with your hands.

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

Yes I think you're right there ertyu. A lot of my work right now is very easy too, all things I've done before.. have to be creative (design process) but not necessarily struggling to figure anything out in code. I did do a lot of LinkedIn brand outreach for a few months while I was interviewing earlier this year. My SSI is top 1% for my industry. And I still answer questions there from aspiring devs, post more like weekly now. My LinkedIn/professional online space is pretty good in that regard.

I think it's part of the reason why I'd like to start a D&D blog too, no intellectual stimulation. Making maps would be highly rewarding I think as well, just need to start.

I changed my horizontal axis on my net worth chart since it was starting to show dates instead of just the month/year format. I just changed "treat fields as text" to off, and it auto-split the vertical guides and horizontal axis points to only the January dates. Makes it really easy to see change in net worth by year.

Image

Each band represents about $4k USD.

2016: +$4k
2017: +$8k
2018: +12k (a little less)
2019: +4k (a little more)
2020: +24k so far

Enlightening

Scott 2
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Scott 2 »

I had to look up SSI. Ugh. It's much more fun on the hiring side of the table.

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

There’s rumor I might end up with an underling come end of 2021 @Scott 2

Scott 2
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Scott 2 »

I found a little experience in the hiring and management side very enlightening. I can't say I wish a full time day of it on anyone, but that is the long term way of the working world.

My wife was equally disturbed by the linked in SSI. That's something straight out of 1984.

One question on working 1-2h a day. Surely your boss can see your version control commits. Doesn't he ever say - "hey Viktor, I am sure you can do more, what's going on?"

I tried instituting metrics on submitted code reviews at my place. They are trivial to get and give a very clear idea of what is happening. The managers were not surprised and didn't want to deal with it. I guess maybe that's my answer.

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

Good question @Scott 2, and I don't know enough about management, software engineering to answer this question. So this will be largely biased conjecture from talks between me and my manager, and comparison with others devs.

Yes, checking version control would show lines/week, commits/day, and time of day. We've never tracked like that, and got off of JIRA within the first couple months I started. It's a very different setup than the average software team.

Again the example of my girlfriend, or maybe I haven't given it.

Girlfriend:
5-10 person team (depending on who you count)
15-30 points/sprint for the WHOLE team
TDD, strict agile (daily standups), code reviews, meetings, weekly one-on-ones, etc ~2-4 hours/day in meetings
TWO WEEK SPRINTS

Now, my company is different... a lot of our platforms don't have scaling concerns, large data issues... but we will have some coming up. That's why the other dev recently advanced to senior backend... to tackle and research those issues.

Me:
1 person team
30-50 points/sprint for just me
ONE WEEK SPRINT
meetings only on Mondays, no TDD (or testing), self QA, self design, self user research, self-managed

How do you ask me to do more? It's a candid conversation I pre-empted with my manager recently. It's obvious how much more I do, and how much it saves the company. Custom software, faster and better than you can out-source (according to CTO, again a lot of this is secondhand biased and I don't have as much background as e.g. @Scott 2).

It's hard to find someone like me, for my salary (junior rates), that can self-manage and be productive. NOT SAYING IT CANT BE FOUND OR IM SOME KIND OF UNICORN. But the average dev (my understanding at least), is not looking to do what I do.

So when I told my manager about the 1 minute tasks, 40 minute work-week, his opinion was,

"When the time comes, I may need more"

(e.g. some tight deadline or something exploded... isn't that the norm tho?),

"Notice we don't have conversations about your productivity"
E.g. the work I do is plenty fast, and I am known for being highly productive

Lastly, I will mention that we do have deadlines. And I typically destroy those.

So I think, at least form my biased, uninformed POV, that the question isn't really... "Won't your boss ask for more?"... it's more like, "Why do the rest of software engineers do so much less?"

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

I see my work as inherently exploitative when compared to other software professionals at similar years experience, and similar level of responsibility. I built an entire platform in <4 months, using technologies nobody else has used (e.g. I found 1 broken github repo, and a broken tutorial on how to combine C# with Vue), with just a data model and a single screen design (10+ screen website). And this isn't like a static web page, it was an online learning management system, e.g. the equivalent of Codecademy but for hackers.

The tradeoff is they leave me alone, and I work when I want. And I'll be there if you need me.

Also on LinkedIn's SSI, it's basically a tool to measure how SEO'd your LinkedIn is... how on-brand you are, are you reaching the people it thinks you want to reach... It's more like a tool to measure your effectiveness on the platform, not like a metric that everyone uses to judge themselves. It's especially useful I think for people in sales and anyone who does a lot of business through LinkedIn.

Personally, I still cold-apply and have never gotten a position any other way, so I use it more as a ****-measuring tool lol I guess but whatever... It helps me determine if I need to post more I guess, if I'm on-brand. If you game it, you get more InMail blasting from recruiters and MAYBE if you apply somewhere, they'll already recognize your or something from being in-network and at the top of the LinkedIn algorithm. Idk

Scott 2
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Scott 2 »

That stuff you are not doing - it is what makes the progression from junior to senior to architect. For all the lip service agile puts around done working software, organizations pay for mature development practices.

Do you read IT books? There's one called the Phoenix Project that made the rounds a few years ago. It describes the path you are on, with the character Brent. He's smart, just solves whatever is given to him. Over the years, as his systems accumulate, it leads to really bad quality of life. The annoying processes protect from that as well.

It's not an uncommon tradeoff to ask from a developer, especially in a small organization, but it sounds like your girlfriend is in a place that will better position her for progression. If the game is to level, you need that stuff.


Story points are relative, btw. Comparison of them across organizations means someone is doing something wrong.


I get what the Linked in SSI is. The intent is to drive engagement to their platform, by giving people a score. If enough people take it seriously, it becomes self fulfilling and they can iterate on the complexity. It's an attempt to reduce individuals to a number and make that the standard industry metric in HR. Just like you have a credit score. Then they have a huge competitive moat, protecting their business. It's great for them, but maybe not the rest of us.

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

Makes sense and it's definitely something I'm aware of. One of the additional tradeoffs to this type of work is the comparison with e.g. my girlfriend's job, as you said, and the software practices that we don't engage in. But I don't want that kind of job right now, and I definitely don't want to go to senior and architect (I've already been promoted to mid-level) as I'm not particularly interested in the technical stuff. E.g. how I haven't studied data structures in preparation for coding tests.

I find building UIs for in-company fun and easy enough.

As well, I do think that a lot of my skills are still transferable and the years experience + social skills make me not too worried about advancing. I know how to write tests, I know how to do agile (as I mentioned, we do agile), I know scrum, standup, etc, I know how to worry about the poor schmuck who has to look at my code after me, object oriented... all the buzz words I can talk about and pass an interview with besides data types. Because I'd rather go to sleep then learn that stuff.

I've also had reading a c# book on my agenda for about the whole year, but I have no interest in actually reading it. Becoming more technical is not what I want to do. I'd rather go the manager route, if my career lasts that long. Ideally, incremental pay for very little extra stress. See, I'm working like I was in China right now, but earning triple and having a much higher savings rate (or potential at least, once I get spending in check).

Or go to contract work.

And ya, story points are relative, but I don't see how comparing across organizations is "WRONG" in anyway... How can comparison be right or wrong?

Her 1 point task was handling a bug where the email was too long in a dropdown menu (e.g. add word-wrapping, some responsive concerns) and a 2-3 point task was adding a new field in the database (some sort of wordpress-esque CMS) and the conditional to show it or something like that in the code. Those are pretty equivalent to what I do, so I know I do more than her whole team in 1 week, as far as features built and bugs solved, from what I've seen of their task boards. Of course, my view of her work isn't perfect, but I definitely think it's INSIGHTFUL to compare across organizations, not WRONG/RIGHT.

I'm not sure what you're getting at with the Phoenix Project if you want to expand. I don't care one way or another about tests, QA, the "best practices" so to speak in the industry. As in, I would use them if asked, and I won't if asked not to. I'm not like a code fanatic (not calling you one @Scott either), which I've seen and met over LinkedIn. Some people love code, and are super passionate about doing something X way instead of Y way. My company is more "Does it work?" "Yes" "Cool, next."

And for me coding is just a means to an end. Right now it's easy street on ~$75k, and I know at current skillset there's $10-20k I could get when switching companies, without studying any harder, but there's risk in losing the WLB I have here.

$100k+ might be a little too big league for me to get, but that's okay, again, if I have WLB. If you offered $100k, for me to do my girlfriend's job, I wouldn't right now. Because she has to be butt in chair 20+ hours/week for face-to-face, and she has to work on someone else's codebase. I like that I am almost entirely autonomous, have little oversight, and am not micro-managed. Tradeoffs are missing best practices, code reviews, etc.

That 'tradeoff' is actually what I used when searching for a new job. "Ya I can do xyz, but at my company I'm missing abc, and I want that additional blah blah so I can be a better dev". Seemed to go over pretty well. But actually I think the soft skills that I'm earning at my job are more important and still transferable on the dev -> manager route, which is more interesting to me at least than the dev -> architect route. As an example, I'm arguably faster and better developer than my manager.... And I say arguably out of respect, because he has a lot of experience seeing things, managing... But as far as code goes, I think we'd agree I'm better. And the senior definitely knows more about the backend considerations, scaling, architecture, etc, than our manager does as well, without question.

Not saying we don't have complimentary skillsets and I can't learn from them. My point is more that the manager route isn't so much about technical skills as the architect route, and if I for some reason work 5-10 years, instead of 3-5, at more than a part-time clip, than that's where I'd want to go instead.... but honestly I'd rather do what I do part-time for an extra year or two than work too hard be a manager or architect... I'm already on track financially, so the extra effort is hard to warrant, at least for the wage-slave part of my life.

Definitely interested in your perspective on my perspective a la architect vs manager route and technical-skill growth concern differences between the two paths.

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

I got an outside-of-work HSA early this year, but haven't contributed. And I think it has a fee structure too lol, so I need to get money in there... Will probably lump sum some cash into it.

edit: 15 paragrahps on different topic moved to new post b/c of same posting times below
Last edited by Viktor K on Fri Dec 04, 2020 11:23 am, edited 2 times in total.

jacob
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by jacob »

HSAs tend to be sneaky in terms of fees e.g. requiring a min balance to stay free of monthly fees and/or not counting the invested part when determining that limit. Read the fine print carefully!

Scott 2
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Scott 2 »

I inferred from your earlier posts that the current job is providing low engagement, which feels like a bit of a let down. From what you describe, there's good reason to feel that way, even if the numbers are great on paper. If that's not the case, and you are happy with the game being played, even better.

For what it's worth, I originally shared your sentiment on staying an individual contributor. The problem was, I grew anyway. I found myself working for and with people much earlier in their development. All my work friends were promoted away. For me, the experience was beyond frustrating. Within two years I was re-applying for the promotion I'd rejected.


For the story points - think in terms of the organizational IT asset, not the dropdown on the screen. This is the collection of applications, people, processes and infrastructure that support the business. In your girlfriend's company, the extra processes are making investments in the rest of that IT asset. It's an apples and oranges comparison. What matters, is that within the organization, everyone is calibrated on the same task as 1 point.

A manager is architecting this organizational IT asset. It encompasses the work of the technical architecture. Ideally, they have someone to own the most complex details of the technology. I'm not into that stuff either, btw. But, the manager needs to understand, to make sound decisions. When I speak of architecture, I am thinking of that overall organizational asset.


When I refer to junior, senior, architect etc. - it is rough hand waving at skill levels, akin to developer Wheaton levels. It takes years of grind to deeply understand them. I don't think it's possible produce effective architectures without having worked through some system lifecycles. 1-2 hours of self-directed work a day carries heavy opportunity against that path.

The industry itself is rife with title inflation, so one company's mid-level might be another's architect. On the hiring side, titles are an emergent property of recruiting and retention. A better title is a free addition to the compensation package.

Again - this is not to be critical of you. I am noting the trade off the company is making with your career development, to provide the work life balance you are enjoying. It may totally be worth it.


I would argue the broader perspective on development practices is equally useful in technical management roles. They are how teams scale (means to an end), navigating the increasing complexity that comes with time and growth. There are many, many approaches that seem 100% reasonable but have common failure patterns. Understanding those is part of what makes an effective manager. This is technology agnostic. I don't know how someone gets that without living through some of the failures.

The Phoenix Project describes how years of failed or missing practices snowball, the impact it has on the people involved, and how they dig out of the mess. It's easy as a smart person who gets stuff done by any means necessary, to end up the hero (brent). It's good for the ego, but terrible for the rest of life.


I don't agree that management is very little extra stress. From that perspective, individual contributor roles are where it is at. It doesn't feel like it, but the crap absolutely rolls uphill. In addition to a boss thrashing your day, now every single person working for you can as well. The political games also become more frequent and sophisticated.

Good managers shield the team from it. But, get a discussion going on how people are sleeping at night - the managers, the directors - not well. To use a gaming analogy - management is like multi-boxing an FPS while contending with high ping times.

Viktor K
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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

Oh damn I edited my post to add like 15 paragraphs, sorry about that lol. Same timing.

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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Viktor K »

My players all nearly died on the last map I made, which means they've been on the same map longer than expected. About 6 weeks in real life now. The game was my impetus for drawing maps. Someone more driven than me (consistently driven? lol) would make a schedule, habit, draw a map/day or whatever like all the other map artists do on Instagram.

I dropped out of the Tues-Thurs game I joined (as a player to get insight on other DMs and hopefully have some fun). It was too beer-and-pretzels D&D for me to join. There's all kinds of different ways to play, and each table has a different vibe. From Angry GM's type of fun article (https://theangrygm.com/gaming-for-fun-p ... g-engaged/)...
Sensation: The fun of having your senses stimulated.
Fantasy: The fun of losing yourself in an imaginary world and being something you’re not.
Narrative: The fun of experiencing a well-told story.
Challenge: The fun of overcoming obstacles.
Fellowship: The fun of interacting with others and working together.
Discovery: The fun of exploring and uncovering things.
Expression: The fun of leaving your personal mark on the world.
Submission: The fun of of turning your brain off and doing effortless things.
They were much more in Submission, teenage-version of Fellowship, and maybe Expression? I'm much more on the Fantasy, Narrative, Fellowship, Challenge drivers. Still I learned some things from the DM that I've already started applying in my own games. After a few weeks though, I withdrew from the game.

I participate in a game Sunday night with my sister, the girlfriend in the broken-up couple from the game I started last year, and 3 people I met just through the game. The DM is a professional DM, running ~5/week for teens and under, and gets paid by the parents per player per game. So probably an extra $100-400/week, from the rates I've heard. But one of the teens was maybe too mature for their group, player withdrew, DM felt bad and really like that player's playstyle, so made this game as their "fun" game and running it for free.

Not much different from my own DM style, except better at hitting Sensation drives for players. Uses voices non-stop for NPCs... the DM is a producer/actor so they've got the background... But it's a published adventure, which I wanted to try, since uses pre-made material is one way to button up narratives in the game, something that's probably more important when getting paid.

Published adventures have just as much prep-time, sometimes more, since you have to learn someone else's story. You need to read it front-back in a terribly formatted book for its purpose once or twice, have it open during the game, and modify everything as the game goes along. So you really do just as much prep. But, like I said, it's a buttoned up, polished story.

Haven't noticed a difference as a player so far. Game is hella fun. And I've confidently started using voices in my own game, and doing more descriptive narrative of scenes/environments/people to hit the Sensory note, which I know my players are big on. That's also why I drew maps, because my players are huge on Sensory.

Anyways, I'm thinking with my new tues-thurs to maybe run a one-shot or two or three for free. Find some randos online, grab a player or two that I know, draw some maps, make a story, and run some players through it 1-2/week for a month or two. That'll give me some exposure to DMing for strangers and an impetus to draw maps.

From there I can either have enough confidence to advertise paid games, or have a habit built up of map-drawing and start my Patreon. Or both :mrgreen:.

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Re: An American Millennial

Post by jacob »

You're surely familiar with this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartle_ta ... ayer_types

I think it applies to IRL too.

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Re: An American Millennial

Post by Lemur »

I DONT EVEN KNOW IF I CAN ERE, honestly. The times I've been unemployed... Or comfortable... I've got a real problem applying myself. I probably couldn't make it, honestly. Part of me thinks I'd lose it EREing. Best to have kids so I have something to chase... besides the dollar, or my own pleasure. ENTJs are a funny case, if you've ever read about them. I'm a funny case, if you've ever read about me... Feel like a pile of wasted talent, lol. I get people.. I can make decisions (though INTJs, with all the reflection, can make better decisions than me... but I can also blow up your confidence in your carefully planned plans with a small, stream-of-consciousness criticism). ENTJs are also known for arrogance.
Sorry but this remind me of my brother who is not having a great relationship with his Spouse...so they decided that having kids would bring them closer together :lol: but also... :shock:

Food for thought - We often undermine our own abilities and confidence by believing in the story or narratives we make up about ourselves.

An example - As an INTJ in the consulting field, I learned over time to play to my strengths. I often find I am the smartest guy in the room (technical expertise or understanding a specific problem related to the databases being discussed). I've all the details and well-thought out plans, but I'm not the loudest. My ideas often were getting passed up because I didn't speak up. By buying into the narrative that I am an Introvert only, I would limit myself this way by trying to influence from behind the scenes only (well-crafted emails, speaking to people one by one privately, etc). Over-time I learned that I was limiting myself greatly and also the simple political fact that other managers and consultants were basically cashing in on my ideas in public and making them there own.

All personality types can be shifted on a sliding scale. For instance, I think of Introvert/Extrovert as a video game "Mana bar". You can only use spells up to the point where your mana runs out. Lets say Extroverts always have 300 mana but Introverts have 100 mana. They both drain their mana with every casted spell (social interaction); in fact, extroverts mana recovers quicker. But the Introvert with the so called 'growth mindset' learns when to cast their spells strategically. He/She doesn't limit themselves by never casting a spell. In other words, one needs to learn to wear different hats...and build antifragility into their own personality. Another example might be when I'm having disagreements with my Spouse, I learned to dial down the "Thinking" part of my personality and up the "Feeling" part. My Spouse ultimately became on board with FIRE/ERE to begin with, when I made my case from a "Feeling" (building a vision) perspective then using dollars and graphs...

This is a long-winded way of me saying that do not make this a self-fulfilling prophesy. You can apply yourself with some behavioral corrections...
Last edited by Lemur on Fri Dec 04, 2020 11:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

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