Gus' road to retirement

Where are you and where are you going?
wolf
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Location: Germany

Re: Gus' road to retirement

Post by wolf » Wed Jul 10, 2019 11:37 am

That was an insightful description of how your focus changed during the last 10 years. It sounds amazing. I guess the "money problem" is solved then?
Augustus wrote:
Tue Jul 09, 2019 6:22 pm
I'm actually kind of sad to go on my road trip, because I've been enjoying myself so much right here. I've heard the idea thrown around that you should make your life a sort of vacation, instead of dreaming of vacationing for 2 weeks a year, or dreaming of FI, you should be building your life in such a way that you're on a perpetual "vacation." I call it maximizing joy. This is my primary focus now.

I think you mean the quote from Seth Godin
Seth Godin wrote:Instead of wondering when your next vacation is, maybe you should set up a life you don't need to escape from.

suomalainen
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Re: Gus' road to retirement

Post by suomalainen » Wed Jul 10, 2019 5:29 pm

Congrats, man. Enjoy it for what it is while it lasts, knowing that this too shall pass, either because you get your fill of it and you're ready to try something else, or because that unexpected curveball gets foisted on you.

Mister Imperceptible
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Re: Gus' road to retirement

Post by Mister Imperceptible » Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:53 am

I hope you spend more time dancing in your underwear at home before you have another kid.

Augustus
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Re: Gus' road to retirement

Post by Augustus » Thu Aug 01, 2019 6:44 pm

@CL: You jinxed me! Something about the road trip sent me crashing back to reality, I'm still trying to figure out why.
@wolf: I think money is solved at this point, yes. It's just a matter of time as long as I maintain my current trajectory. I don't see any cause for my trajectory changing as there is plenty of work out there as far as I can tell, and I'm predicting my expenses to go down and not up.
@suo: I was double jinxed!
@MI: I think kid 2 is off the table haha, that leaves plenty of time to dance in underwear.

The road trip was fun and many memories and photos were had, it's always good to see my parents (more so now that I'm aware of my own and their mortality), Zion and Bryce were neat, Zion was my favorite. All that said, I don't want to go on another road trip in a looooong time :D I'll fly next time. California is next to the great american desert, so the driving consisted of 90% super hot no water zones and 10% things I'd like to see. If I do another road trip I'll fly over the desert and rent a car somewhere I've never seen before. I've criss-crossed the great desert 10+ times in my life, no desire to do so again.

I've been really moody and negative upon my return. I think it has to do with focus and scheduling.

Re: scheduling. I've noticed that I need to have part of my days allocated to accomplishing goals, part to exercise/physical joy, and part to being a lazy contemplative bum. Once again, what sounded amazing while working did not sound as amazing while not working. Gone are my dreams of lazing on the beach all day, in is the practical reality that I start to get depressed if I'm not getting goals accomplished. So now I try to get in some app work or studying, exercise, projects (I started my novel!), reading, and meditation in a balanced manner. Doing all one thing or the other doesn't do it for me.

Re: focus. Now that I don't have external pressure shifting my focus all day with work and the like, I tend to fall in to negative moods and not snap out of them if I'm not careful. I have to consciously adjust my focus on the good things, otherwise I can end up depressed. It's really weird how this works. While working, I would have figured I'd feel like I was on top of the world while not working. Once again proving that I can't predict what I'll actually want to do or feel like when not working. The road trip was kind of stressful, and I think I shifted to being anxious.

A balanced schedule, some productivity but nothing overwhelming the entire day, consciously choosing what to focus on, etc seem like they may be the key to my eventual retirement.

It's also still amazing to me that I STILL feel like I don't have enough time in a day. At least I'm doing what I want now though, and not what other people want. But it almost feels like my days are shorter, because I want to do so much.

Augustus
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Re: Gus' road to retirement

Post by Augustus » Thu Aug 01, 2019 9:18 pm

Augustus wrote:
Thu Aug 01, 2019 6:44 pm
Re: scheduling. I've noticed that I need to have part of my days allocated to accomplishing goals, part to exercise/physical joy, and part to being a lazy contemplative bum. Once again, what sounded amazing while working did not sound as amazing while not working. Gone are my dreams of lazing on the beach all day, in is the practical reality that I start to get depressed if I'm not getting goals accomplished. ... Doing all one thing or the other doesn't do it for me.
This makes me wonder if working part time might actually make me happier, even if I didn't need the money. Although I suspect it would only work if it were my own products (apps, novels, etc). I've been working on apps a little bit each day, at first it chafed me to have to do anything related to "work," but now I realize it actually makes me feel better to build something.

Upon reflection, perhaps what really kills me about working full time is that it overwhelms everything else. When I'm done working after a full day I'm drained, and all my other aspirations are pushed to the wayside. If it were just a portion of my day each day, and I could do some work in the morning, and hit the beach or write or read afterwards, it might be a positive thing? This is new territory for me, as I've always thought my goal was more along the lines of never having to work for money during my increasingly longer periods of time off.

I don't know, I'll be experimenting over the next month or two to find what makes me most happy.

suomalainen
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Re: Gus' road to retirement

Post by suomalainen » Wed Aug 07, 2019 9:51 pm

Not a jinx, just a restatement of the facts of life - impermanence, hedonic adaptation, etc. For me, I think the key is the mindset-shift - the things you do every day: preparing meals; grooming; caring for kids, spouse or others; tidying up; creating/fixing things; etc...these are all forms of work. Working for money is also a form of work. Sometimes we work for money so we can avoid doing these other jobs; sometimes we take care of these other jobs so that we don't have to work for money. At the end of the day, work needs to be done and it gets done one way or the other. Why spend so much time stressing about it being this work or that work?

Point being - as you said above too,
A balanced schedule, some productivity but nothing overwhelming the entire day, consciously choosing what to focus on, etc seem like they may be the key to my eventual retirement.
Accept the fact that life requires some work without differentiating that this work is "good" while that work is "bad". It's just work and although you might have preferences, perhaps it's not a negative thing...but thinking makes it so.

That said, full-time work (whether paid or chores) + parenting = unbalanced and therefore draining.

classical_Liberal
Posts: 889
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Re: Gus' road to retirement

Post by classical_Liberal » Thu Aug 08, 2019 11:37 am

Augustus wrote:
Thu Aug 01, 2019 9:18 pm
Upon reflection, perhaps what really kills me about working full time is that it overwhelms everything else. When I'm done working after a full day I'm drained, and all my other aspirations are pushed to the wayside. If it were just a portion of my day each day, and I could do some work in the morning, and hit the beach or write or read afterwards, it might be a positive thing?
Pretty sure you are psychically channeling me here! There can be the group work side of this too. It forces some social interaction. Which, even if you don't love all the personalities, tends to be good to a limited degree, too much time with people who aren't my type overwhelms. Also, there's the whole "forced" group dynamics. Because lets face it, adults have a hard time playing well together to reach a goal, but in a job most feel obligated to show up and do their part. Even amateur sports teams are hard to keep together in 30's+ age range (I've tried, it sucks). I kind-of like accomplishing group goals, it creates comradery.

This whole thing goes back to my main problem. Paid work for someone else, at least my experience of it in the US, has very little respect for personal schedule. Sure, there can be some flexibility, as long as you put in your 50 hours or whatever. However, the total time commitment and/or the days or time of day they want you, always force a whole bunch of compromises on personal life. I wish I had an answer. At this point the best I can see is part time, or full-time with large breaks. Not sure which will end up better. Unless you want to work for yourself, but that's not an option for me in any serious endeavor because I'd be the worst boss I ever had. My personal expectations for myself are way too high.

EDIT: Although there is the concept of work and play intermingling/being indistinguishable, but I'm no where near this Wheaton level.

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