ffj's early retirement

Where are you and where are you going?
OTCW
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by OTCW »

That is a great looking shop. Can't wait to see it fitted out with your tools, vehicles, etc.

ffj
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Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@OTCW

Thanks. It's going to look great when I'm done with the interior. I plan on putting up shiplap or tongue and groove wood to balance out all of this metal and soften it up a bit. I have quite the collection of antique tools that I will hang on the walls not only for decoration but for use also.

But I'm moving on to the house after today with the completion of the ceiling. I can't justify working on this anymore when I have a house to finish.




The ceiling panels were 14 feet long and very floppy so I had to rig a system to support one end while I lined the panel up before screwing. This was simply a couple of brackets that I made out of scrap. All of the screw holes were marked with an awl so I didn't have to guess where to place the screw while simultaneously holding it in place over my head. I would put the pre-marked panel on the scaffold, make sure I had a screw in my screw gun, and lift the panel into place with the help of the jig. And then while balancing it in the correct position, screw it into place and most importantly lesson the weight off of my arms. I used to hang drywall so a lot of the skills necessary for that came in handy here.

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jacob
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by jacob »

Ahh, some day I plan to have a shop like that. Next house ...

Dumb question. Suppose you want to get a machine tool with a shipping weight of say 5,000lbs in there. How would that work? A friend of mine has his mill/lathe set up just inside the port because that was as far as the truck's crane could reach.

OTCW
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by OTCW »

A portable gantry crane might do the trick.

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Cheepnis
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Cheepnis »

Awesome progress! What are your primary uses of the shop going to be?

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@MEA

I watched a doc on the Mennonites last night and they are very similar. I've been buying all of my metal from a Mennonite owned business and the whole area around their business is filled with Mennonites and their farms. All of the roads have a scuffed up center where the horses feet scratch the road as they travel around in horse and buggy. I stopped into one of their stores and man was it filled with fresh food! They even had fresh mushrooms which I was very curious to learn more about their operation, but they were button mushrooms which primarily grow on aged manure so I let it go. Plus, like the Amish, a lot of them are quite awkward at conversation, especially the young women. Now pair that with me, who also sucks at conversation in general, and you have a disaster in the making. Haha

But yeah, not the life for me.


@jacob

You have to go low tech: pry bars and rollers ( short sections of pipe). Once it's on the concrete it's no problem, but offloading from a truck to the garage door opening is the tricky/dangerous part. It reminds me of a comic/tragic story an instructor once told us students. He was a dive master that had just returned from a job to recover a body from a dock and the deceased person was an invalid in a mechanical wheelchair. Apparently the family rented a fancy boat to take everybody on an excursion and didn't want to leave Uncle Bob on the dock so they improvised a ramp to the boat. Since the wheelchair was motorized and heavy and Bob was seat belted into the chair and boats move with applied loads... Yeah, you have to be careful going from one plane to the next.


@OTCW

How would you get that beast into the shop? :) Just kidding, that could work for some applications. I know some use a hoist that is permanently attached to the ceiling but that beyond what I need or want to spend, but they are cool. I could envision myself finding things to lift with it.

@cheepnis

Mainly woodworking but I like building things in general, so I could easily get into other disciplines. It is going to be really nice to start a project and leave it exactly how I left off to continue another day. I doubt a car will ever see the interior of this space as I have more than enough machinery to fill up this entirely. But it's going to be my space with all of the crap I like and want, no apologies. My wife will have the house to do as she pleases, ha.

Cheepnis
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Cheepnis »

It is going to be really nice to start a project and leave it exactly how I left off to continue another day.
Yes! I have bemoaned the no workspace (let alone an actual shop) predicament in my journal at length. I'm sure you'll love it!

regarding rollers: about a year ago at work we were using rollers to maneuvers three giant air compressor/air dryer units that each came on their own skid. While we were doing this one of the hands from the general contractor, who none of us knew, comes out of nowhere and starts talking to us while we're shoving and shuffling rollers. I'll never forget what he said: "rollers are really pretty primitive technology, it's what the Egyptians used. At least until they got help from the aliens." All three of us stopped and looked at him. He was dead serious. We all had a good chuckle afterword but man was it awkward for a second.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@Cheepnis

Haha. I was just talking today to a buddy who believes his workplace is haunted, and he is not kidding in the slightest. He can tell you exactly where the ghosts are located and what they do to get your attention. Like you, I just don't know how to respond to that.

Last Friday I was talking with my lumber supplier and he casually brought up politics and thirty minutes later he was discussing some of the wildest conspiracy theories I have ever heard, to the point of crazy absurdity. The whole time I was thinking " what in the fuck is he watching to get these stories? " And then he confessed this was all from Facebook.

You just have to smile and nod and find an escape route. ;)

EMJ
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by EMJ »

7Wannabe5 wrote:
Sat Jun 13, 2020 9:32 am
What fun! I wish I could recall title of brilliant book that focused on human psychology towards garden design. You could play at creating settings that promote any number of positive human emotional states. For instance, simple bench by lily pond = peaceful/serene or rope tire swing hung over soft landing space = invitation to play. Hiding places and cubby-holes, very curvy paths through thick high growth that suddenly open into lovely, light dappled, open space , etc. etc.
Is the book Christopher Alexander A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction

EMJ
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by EMJ »

ffj wrote:
Mon Jun 15, 2020 10:04 pm
@7

Something I am going to have to do at some point is select the nice specimens in my woods and kill off a lot of the understory trees that don't have a chance to ever fully mature. It pains me though to destroy a beautiful young tree thats only sin was to grow in a bad spot where it can never outcompete the mature trees above it. A lot of them contort themselves trying to get to sunlight and they have crazy bent trunks, which can be attractive too but they also aren't healthy a lot of the times. My goal is to create a grove of trees that are pruned and spaced to where you can casually stroll throughout, while still maintaining privacy. The possibilities are endless which is exciting.
Being able to grow so many species of nut trees is wonderful. Have you looked in to agroforestry? Lots of interesting ways to use trees and other plants to grow food and other benefits. Now that you have land that you will be on long-term, are working on thinning your forest and can grow replacement seedling I think you might find it interesting.

BMF1102
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by BMF1102 »

@ - FFJ & Jacob a couple sheets of wax paper under each "foot" of the machine and a pry bar can move heavy equipment pretty effectively on relatively smooth concrete, best for small adjusments.Come alongs strapped between the machine and various parts of the building. Longer distances though a heavy duty pallet jack would be better, for cheap solutions (assuming the machine would balance). There are various more expensive ways airskates, forktruck etc.

7Wannabe5
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

@EMJ:

Great guess. I love that book. It is in my permanent collection. The book I can’t recall title was written my a female working garden designer who was inspired by “A Pattern Language.”

guitarplayer
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by guitarplayer »

@7

Maybe 'A Pattern Garden: The Essential Elements of Garden Making' by Valerie Easton?

7Wannabe5
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Location: Clinton River Watershed

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

@guitarplayer:

Maybe, but I don't recall such lavish illustration.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@EMJ

Off the top of my head I am trying to think of all the nut trees I have identified on the property: walnut, beech, oak, hickory, buckeye. I can consume three of the five which is nice.

Pecans and butternuts would be a nice addition if I could find the right varieties. And in that same theme, I'll probably try to add some persimmons, paw-paws, and run of the mill fruit trees at some point. I would really like to see the whole property producing food, not only for myself but for animals too.

I have tons of other trees to which I am not really partial: cedars, hedge apples, hackberry, elms, wild cherry. I think they are important for the overall ecosystem, but some are over-represented and need to be thinned out. It's going to be a multiyear process to get these woods under control and performing as a healthy system.

The work I did over the winter has had many positive effects, namely killing off or severely hampering the growth of non-desirables such as wild rose, vines, and invasive shrubs. And the woods from a distance look so much better than they did last year. The downside is that weeds have popped up in the spaces where I have removed trees and allowed more sunlight into the area. It's going to take a while before I find a nice balance of specimen trees and a healthy understory.


@BMF

Yep, reduce the friction and find a big-ass lever. There is a technique for even lifting a car off of a victim using a fire ladder (lever) and a pivot point ( made from cribbing, which all rescue trucks carry, just blocks of wood). Build a cribbing tower, throw the ladder under the vehicle and on top of the tower, and apply three or four large firemen (lots of those, ha) on the other end and for a hasty retrieval it works well for small and medium sized cars and trucks.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

I have moved over to the construction of the house and it feels good, as the shop was almost an impediment to completing my goal. Everything I do now is getting me closer to finishing.

To bottlerocks, I had to get another permit to install my plumbing. Unfortunately, I had to deal with the same guy who issued my permit to install my water line and like the first encounter, this one wasn't pleasant either. I think he's in ill health and he lashes out at everything as a matter of coping , including people like me who are at his mercy. Due to covid, he wasn't allowed to enter his office and had to work out of his car, which reeked of cigarettes and an even worse smelling air freshener he was using to cover the smell of the cancer sticks. The resulting mixture of horrible odors gave me a headache and locked up my nasal passages. When his computer lost all of the information he single finger pecked into the system, I just had to chuckle to myself as he got even more upset at life. After a few goddamns he finally got the info back in and for another $136, I get the honor of him inspecting my work later on. I can't wait, haha.

I have bought and staged a bit of my plumbing supplies but my main focus at the moment is to install the roof. My roof panels arrived yesterday and due to the steepness of the roof, I have installed a couple of anchors at the peak to use with a rope system. Here is the view from up top.

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Today I put in the panels over the side porch, which looks nice. The color matches the shop roof.

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And here is a view that wasn't available until today due to a very large dirt pile. Fortunately my neighbor wanted my fill dirt, which was all clay, for his property to fill in a low spot. So he hired these guys to dig it, load it, and take it away. Cost me nothing, and it was a big job. Worked out great for both of us.

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I still have two large piles of topsoil, which I'll keep for future grading and gardens, but the stuff I had no use for is gone!

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

The garage doors are in and we have a bit of a problem. The color doesn't match what my wife picked out and she has the color sample to prove it. So tomorrow I get to straighten this mess out with the installer which is a pain in the ass. They did a good job putting them in but when my other half saw the doors after work today she wasn't happy, so the picture you see may change in the near future.

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The weather around here has been obscenely stifling. Highs in the 90's, with very high humidity levels and absolutely no air movement. And I'm working on the roof. :cry: Absolute misery but I'm getting some work done.

I am working with much larger panels too which I have to be careful with as they can bend and crinkle if not handled correctly. These panels are almost 21 feet long and once I start carrying them up the roof I can't stop until the top where they go and can be supported. It can be a little intimidating at times but I can assure you that there is no wind to hamper me. Man it's hot up there.

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Due to the steepness I've installed an anchor system with ropes at the top. Without these in place there is no way to keep yourself from sliding off of the roof. My rope training and equipment has saved the day.

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I am using a Petzl ID as my primary device to move up and down the roof with a simple prusik knot as a backup. Works very well and I feel completely safe while working.

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The windows and doors arrived today and hopefully soon those will be getting installed. As part of the builders contract, they will installing those which is a relief as a few of them are quite large and heavy and far off of the ground.

rube
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by rube »

How is the building going ffj?

Cheepnis
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Cheepnis »

I too am awaiting an update and I hope all is well. Also wondering how your 200 tomato plants are getting along? I've never had any luck growing tomatoes other than those of the cherry/grape variety. I'll normally only get 2-4 small tomatoes per plant and that's it, so I want to live vicariously through this journal!

ffj
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Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@rube, cheepnis

Thanks for asking about the progress. Due to a bunch of shit occurring lately, including my dog dying, I am taking a small break from posting here. I'll be back up and running at some point, but right now I have no motivation.

No need for anyone to offer condolences about my dog, as Max had a good run starting 13 years ago when I picked him out at the Humane Society. He should of died years ago when he got hit by a car so anything after that has been a bonus. It still sucks though.

Oh, the tomato plants were a bust at the new place. I don't know if it was the soil or the plants or a combination of both. I'll have to send a sample of the soil off for an analysis.

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