ffj's early retirement

Where are you and where are you going?
jacob
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by jacob »

Are those particle board I-beams home made or an actual product? Glued, screwed, or nailed together? I assume the SPH boards are full length all across the roof, but the particle board is not?

BMF1102
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by BMF1102 »

Jacob - you can see the joint in the 2x3 top board of the I-joist in the bottom left corner of the last pic looking over all the joists and I believe the OSB is various sections all glued together as well.

Edit to add ->ffj - I enjoy keeping up with your progress looking good!

Riggerjack
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack »

@ Jacob

Those are called TJI joists. They are straighter than wood joists. I've never used them for a ceiling, but plenty of floor joists. They make for a strong but bouncy floor. I'm guessing ffj is using them for ceiling joists because of a long span? Maybe a combination of long span, and high load rating for attic storage...

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@bigato

Yes, I will be building the roof also. It's going to be a simple gable with soffits.

The rafters are already cut, and assuming the carpenter who cut them was consistent they should go up relatively fast. The house they came from was exactly 28 feet wide and so is the shop.



@jacob

BMF gave a good description, as well as rigger. They are engineered floor joists for the most part, but I have seen them used as rafters too for big spans. I needed a way to tie my outside walls together while also keeping my open space below. Normally one would just order trusses but I already have all of the rafters, and I didn't want a support post and beam down the middle of the shop, so in essence I will be creating my own custom trusses. Once I show you guys how the rafters will be placed it will make sense.

@BMF

Thanks, glad you enjoy.

@rigger

It's 28 feet of span. Even if I had wanted to use dimensional lumber, I'm not sure I could have acquired anything 28 feet long. So you find them bouncy? Even with proper support underneath?




It's been raining all day but I still managed to get a little done with the cladding. Once I get a bottom row complete on all four walls I will start putting the rafters on.

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Riggerjack
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack »

Yeah, bouncy. Not unstable, or anything, just more flexible. 2x10 wood joists vs 2x10 tji, 1.25 in t&g subflooring, walking, there is more bounce on the tji floor.

But it's not the sort of thing most people would notice. As a ceiling, it wouldn't be noticable at all, except the tji's are straighter, so your drywall will be cleaner looking.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

After two days of constant rain, I was finally able to start on the roof. It's a simple 5/12 pitch that will be on 24 inch centers.

The hardest part getting started is setting the ridge, and I just simply cut a support to put underneath it until I get my rafters started. Remember, the rafters were already cut, so all I had to do is set them as I built my building with these predetermined lengths in mind.

Tomorrow I finish setting the remainder and trim the I-beams.

Image

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ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

Another rained out day, but I managed a couple of tasks before the deluge.

I thought I would show you guys a trick on how not to do this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nt0DT0nXq8


Anytime you throw a ladder with the feet on a slick surface, tie the ladder back so it can't kick back on you.

Image




Finished the rafters yesterday, but I have lots of detail work to finish before I put the metal on the roof. This weather is not helping my progress.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

Spring has sprung.

I am really enjoying the views at the new place. There is so much I still want to accomplish with the landscaping but with scenery like this I have a wonderful starting point.

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I helped my new neighbor out with his roof (he's the guy that plowed my garden earlier this year) and he has two mules that I found photogenic. Look how fat they are, haha. My neighbor jokes that these two will pull him in his funeral hearse when he dies and I think he's serious.

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The shop continues. Between the bad weather and having to mow 3 lawns not much has gotten done. But I have managed to finish the plywood sheeting and now am buttoning up the gable ends. I'll be on the roof soon.

Image

bigato
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by bigato »

Looking great, ffj. Good work man!

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@bigato

Thanks. I'm starting to grow impatient at the speed of the construction. Between having to work off of ladders and scaffolding and it raining constantly ( guess what is happening right now?), I'm growing frustrated that I still don't have a roof on yet.

I did have a productive day yesterday however. The gable ends are boxed in and now I am working on trimming the rafter tails to a consistent length.

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I chose 16 inches as the length of my overhang and I basically pulled string between two set points that I measured. Then I made a simple jig to mark each rafter for cutting. That gives me a nice straight line running parallel to the sides of the shop.

Image

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henrik
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by henrik »

ffj wrote:
Tue May 05, 2020 7:50 am
impatient at the speed of the construction
Believe me, for someone that checks in every few days to see how you're doing, the progress is impressive. Every time I visit your journal I fight the urge to go and start some new construction at my country property (new construction is fun, but I need to keep in mind I have 3 ~100yr old buildings to finish renovating). Designing and building something from scratch on a piece of land like yours is just such an inspiration.

Among the ERE journals that have been updated in the last 5 years, this one comes second only to C40's by number of views (~185K total). So clearly there have been a number of silent fans here.

Are there any fire integrity requirements for a building this size where you are?

theanimal
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by theanimal »

What Henrik said. I look forward to checking the site each day and seeing what you have accomplished. It's impressive. You have a beautiful property.

MEA
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by MEA »

For some reason, the texture of that siding looks like brick from a distance.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@henrik

Keep in mind that I'm not really doing anything else besides some gardening and lawn care. I appreciate the compliment though, and if this inspires anybody else than that's great. I've always said that this is one way I can contribute to the community, by demystifying a lot of the trades. Nobody is asking my advice on how to invest or my thoughts on climate change, haha, for good reason. I know which lane to stay in. ;)

The number of views is interesting. Recently I received a huge spike and knowing that there are only a few thousand of us it made me wonder if somehow the thread was linked elsewhere. I know my life is fascinating, 8-) , but it seems to me that there is an anomaly occurring.

No requirements in the construction as far as fire suppression. The house may require some additional steps but the shop not that I am aware. I'll let you know if I discover anything.

@the animal

It is a beautiful property, which I appreciate greatly. I took a picture of my foundation from the peak of the roof and I kind of marveled on how picturesque the whole area looks. I love being out here.

Image

@MEA

It does look kind of neat, doesn't it?

These were roof panels off of a house that was dismantled, and the pattern work is from the tar paper and shingles.

Funny story: One of the lumber delivery guys asked if I had stained all of the wood when he saw it upon delivery of the I-joists. I said no, just 40 year old wood, haha.


Current progress:

Image

The fascia and slats for the metal roof are installed. My next step is to order the metal roofing.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

Update on the cats:

The male, the mustachioed cat, has decided to start roaming and he doesn't spend too much time in the barn anymore. He is mostly white, so every now and then I will spy him at the edge of the woods in the tall grass. As his color stands out so well, he's not hard to spot. The females however, seem to like the barn quite a bit, although they roam a little bit, but not too far from their perch. Yellowface is by far the most friendly and we've gotten to the point where she will eat right next to me. And she'll purr and do the kneading with her paws and rubbing against stuff. But she won't let me touch her yet but I think it will happen soon as I think she wants some affection.

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The neighbors are quiet once again as another one of them got arrested the other day. I haven't found out who just yet but there were 5 police cars in their driveway Thursday afternoon. It is astounding the difference between when they are active and when they get locked up out here. I've grown to hate the entire drug-addled bunch and it's not healthy, so I leave during the day and work on my new place.

Speaking of:

Image[/url]

I need a roof. I took the time during the rain to order my new roof panels. My wife wants to stay in the "gray" family and this color is called charcoal. The walls will be a lighter shade of gray.

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If you notice on the building, I have left off the fly rafters. There is a reason for this and it originates over a problem I had no control over.

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The building is out of square. Not by much for this span, 2 inches, but it will be an issue once the roof panels are applied. The masons blocked up the walls out of square when it should have been dead on, and there is nothing I can do about it except fudge a little bit and feather out the inconsistencies so the naked eye can't discern them.

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The roof panels are perfectly square, so if I follow the out of square building, then they will "stair-step" to compensate along the front edges. I don't want this, so I will fudge along the eaves which means the edges won't be perfectly parallel with the building. Much easier to trick the eye this way, and why I need to allow the roof panels to determine where the fly rafters land versus the other way around. When this is complete with trim, nobody will be able to see the discrepancies.

I am also in talks with an Amish builder who is currently framing my neighbors house. I spoke with him about possibly framing my house and even a discount if I helped him. I am not happy with the rate of progress doing everything myself, and for $4/square foot, I could have my house framed in a couple of weeks once he could get to me. I'll let you guys know what happens.

SavingWithBabies
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by SavingWithBabies »

How do you measure the squareness? I'm picturing starting at one corner, measuring 90 degrees (with what? one of those angle gauges like for cutting wood?) and putting a line to another peg at next corner, confirming 90 and so forth. But depending on the corner you start at, seems like would get wonky fast but guess you could just correct as you find the more "true" corners? And did you start noticing before measuring that things were off due to boards not quite lining up or was it more of a sanity check and you found then?

Oh, I guess you could just peg each corner, draw a line/string and then measure all the angles and lengths and figure it out that way? For the vertical, I've seen the trick with the hose/tube and water that is sort of like the tool you can make to balance motorcycle carbs. But I'm still fuzzy on the x/y measuring.

Cheepnis
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Cheepnis »

Count me in the "checks in on the regular" camp, great progress!

@SWB, no actual angle measuring required. Grab a 100' tape measure and hook your corner then pull to the opposite corner diagonal from you as in his picture. Make sure the two measurements match and you're good to go. Make sure everything you install from that point onward is plumb and your measurements will hold as you build up. Sounds like the brick layers messed this one up and ffj decided to keep is walls plumb instead of pushing one or more to true it up at the height of the top plate.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@SWB

What Cheepnis said basically. The diagonal measurements will always be the same when a square or rectangle is "square" or has 90 degree corners. So when I measured the corners it was exactly 2 inches out, meaning one diagonal was 2 inches longer. This is something the masons should have checked when they built their "leads" or corners. Since the plywood is flush with the outside on the block ( the metal siding is going to go past the plywood and onto the face of the block) I couldn't just tune my sill plates to make square as that would have looked horrible. Imagine a one inch offset just hanging past the block, not good. So I'm doing the next best thing and hiding the problem in the eaves and if I do it right nobody will ever see an issue.

When one builds there are three things that have to remain constant: it has to be level, plumb, and square. And there are many tricks out there when that doesn't always hold true. Especially when you do finish work, which I started out in many years ago. So even though it irritated me that the block layers screwed up, I also knew it wasn't the end of the world either.


@Cheepnis

Thanks for the compliment and thanks for the help.

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C40
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by C40 »

Oh man that is a beautiful property. It's gonna feel SO F*ING GOOD to sit out on your porch/deck/patio/lawn and enjoy the view around the house you built. Damn

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

It already feels good. I have good neighbors at the new place, plenty of space, and privacy.

The other day I spent a couple of hours just wandering around my woods identifying trees and shrubs and to me that is extremely relaxing. I also have a cot in my barn so when I get tired I lay down and take a nap. It's awesome. I work hard out there but things are much more simple and most importantly to me, private. It has been so long since I have had this much privacy and I love it.

My current neighbors have driven me to take the steps I needed to keep my sanity, and just maybe one day I may thank them for it. Right now they can go to hell but who knows 5 years from now? ;)

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