ffj's early retirement

Where are you and where are you going?
Igotgoals
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2016 2:18 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Igotgoals »

Your trellis is going to be lovely once your plants fill it in - but honestly, it's pretty nice just as it is. Nice job.

I've got to say though, those mushrooms creep me out.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@davtheram12

Thank you for the encouragement. And yes, if you are willing to work, then many of these costs don't have to break the bank. My goal is to come under $100,000 for the house and shop build. My current house is appraised at $224,000, which is an unrealistic sell price due to the neighbors, but I hope I'm proven wrong. I think we can get at least $150,000 and if I don't go over that on the new build then it will be an even trade. My current house is paid for in full so any money we make over the build price is profit. And if we make a profit, then I am buying a tractor! So a little motivation there, haha.

If I wasn't so self conscious about myself I would start Youtubing. I could even make a little money if I gained an audience. The issue is privacy and how none of us have any these days so if I could do it in a way and still remain anonymous I would try it. Thanks again for the confidence.

Currently while waiting on my foundation guys I am re-roofing my house, which it badly needs. I roofed this house in 1996 with cheap 20 year shingles and it sucked then about as much as it sucks now, haha. This is just a layover with a better quality shingle.

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@Igot

I have found that there are two types of people in regards to mushrooms, either they find them interesting or it creeps them out. I think it's kind of fascinating, especially the ramifications for permaculture and the like. My wife on the other hand? Creeps her out and she wants nothing to do with them. Sometimes I wonder how we stay married. Ha

But here is the payoff. A little oil, a pat of butter, some garlic and thyme. And of course some home-grown Kings. Really, really good.

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mooretrees
Posts: 342
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2019 1:21 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by mooretrees »

I know my DH would totally be interested in your hypothetical mushroom youtube channel. He's grown them in the past and wants to again. I'm also super impressed with how much you accomplish! Helps not working a full time job for sure :lol: . I look forward to your posts, I can't wait to get to the place where money is not my number one topic of conversation and get on to living.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@mooretrees

Not having a full-time job working for somebody else is key. It just kills all of your energy and creativity. And you would be surprised at how easy and motivational work is once you get to reap all the benefits. ;)

If your hubby wants a colonized fruiting block pm me and I'll send him one. I've got Shiitake, oysters, enoki, kings, wine cap and I'm trying to get some lions mane going but it's not ready yet. I enjoy watching them grow and you guys may too. (again)

davtheram12
Posts: 72
Joined: Mon May 28, 2018 6:02 pm

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by davtheram12 »

ffj wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 7:44 pm
Thank you for the encouragement. And yes, if you are willing to work, then many of these costs don't have to break the bank. My goal is to come under $100,000 for the house and shop build. My current house is appraised at $224,000, which is an unrealistic sell price due to the neighbors, but I hope I'm proven wrong. I think we can get at least $150,000 and if I don't go over that on the new build then it will be an even trade. My current house is paid for in full so any money we make over the build price is profit. And if we make a profit, then I am buying a tractor! So a little motivation there, haha.

If I wasn't so self conscious about myself I would start Youtubing. I could even make a little money if I gained an audience. The issue is privacy and how none of us have any these days so if I could do it in a way and still remain anonymous I would try it. Thanks again for the confidence.

Currently while waiting on my foundation guys I am re-roofing my house, which it badly needs. I roofed this house in 1996 with cheap 20 year shingles and it sucked then about as much as it sucks now, haha. This is just a layover with a better quality shingle.
I definitely see myself doing most of the work since I do have some experience in construction. My father is a carpenter who would regularly make me his apprentice and I use to install new roofing material shortly after I graduated high school. I don't miss those hard days under >90 degree weather throwing clay roofing tiles (each weighing 12-15 pounds) but I'm sure I would approach it differently today.

It's amazing to see how much those homes are going for. Here in my neighborhood they are all at least $1.3 million and no bigger than 2,200 square feet for the larger examples. A tractor would be great!

Privacy is important so I can't blame you there. Some of the most popular YouTube channels come from creators who don't think twice about uploading their videos. Scotty Kilmer comes to mind. His editing style is comical but he provides great content. He's been able to amass 3.06 million subscribers all while still working as a mechanic from his home. Just some food-for-thought :)

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@dav


"I don't miss those hard days under >90 degree weather throwing clay roofing tiles (each weighing 12-15 pounds) but I'm sure I would approach it differently today. "



As I am no longer 22 years old, I tackle large projects in small segments. I've been roofing for the past 5 days, but my longest day so far has been almost 6 hours with a normal day about 4 hours. It prevents me from burning out and quite frankly I don't have the stamina I once had. I just have to reassess my finish times. I learned a long time ago that 20 minutes a day doing whatever is much better than never starting because the conditions or timing isn't perfect. Having a carpenter father is a wonderful asset by the way. My father also is a carpenter amongst many other things, and I learned a lot working beside him as a kid, although at the time I didn't view it as very fun. ;) Around the age of 14 I discovered that other people wanted my services and they would actually pay me! That was the start of my independence.

I checked out that Kilmer guy on Youtube. I can see why he has so many followers.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

Alright, some much needed progress due to the weather easing up. I had given up any hope for this month but there is/was a narrow window to accomplish something and we're going for it.

Yesterday I helped my buddy excavating the house and shop site. By helping I mean that I walked around with the indicator stick of a rotary laser level establishing grade and his cut lines while he operated the heavy machinery. It saved him from constantly having to check himself but I about froze as there was a lot of cloud cover and a lot of wind. I didn't mind though as I was happy to get started on this foundation.

Here is the final result. I had pictures of the operation but they got lost in a phone upgrade. This is the day after (today).

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And the shop grading. Note that due to a slope we didn't level this site as it would require a tremendous amount of dirt removal ( I had a 24" drop in one corner from the high spot). What we will do here is a step foundation to save labor and materials.

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I also had 100 tons of rock delivered today to finish out the driveway. I've got about 1000 feet of driveway altogether and man is it sucking up the rock. Thankfully the rock delivered today should hold me for a long while as far as the driveway is concerned. The big trucks are going to continue to tear everything up in spots but at least now I have the base to properly fix it.

Some context:

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Tomorrow the footers are to be dug, at least that is what the guy has promised me. Hopefully so.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

Well the guy that was going to dig my footers never showed up, or called to explain why, or nothing. We've had three beautiful days after constant rain and the dude just bails on me. It's shit like this that is very frustrating, as I could have lined up another way if I would have known. Now I have 3 more days of rain to look forward without progress. So I've gone and hired someone else, and we are to start on Wednesday or Thursday, assuming the rain doesn't complicate matters too much. At this point, the block layers I had lined up a month ago have probably moved on with other work. I am so looking forward to this foundation being complete so I can work without interruption.

But I've been busy with other necessary work. The front half of my house is done, and I can get off this roof for a bit and do something different just to break the monotony of it all. I still have to complete the back half as well as ridge caps but she's watertight until I am ready for that.

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I did find a good luck charm while filling my planters at the new place however.

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As a kid I used to hunt for Indian artifacts all of the time and I still have a collection that I've kept all of these years. It has always fascinated me that someone who is lost to history sat down and created this hundreds or even thousands of years ago. Sometimes I wonder what that person may have been like and how they died. When I plow for the garden I am going to keep an eye out.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

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Nothing like being wakened at 245 am to the sound of wailing police cars. I am so ready to move away from these idiots. I wish I could show you guys the mug shot of this latest arrest ( it's tragic/comic) but you would figure out my address easily. Once I move I may list all of them for your enjoyment. Don't do drugs, kids.



Last fall I collected dozens of acorns and hickory nuts, was well as walnuts. I decided to plant them today and was pleasantly surprised a lot of them had already sprouted so the method of burying them in a bucket really works. As well as the refrigerator method, as a bunch of those had sprouted too.

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I'm looking forward to this Spring when they leaf out and to see how many I ultimately get to sprout. I may try maples and redbuds this autumn as well as more oaks and hickories. Who knows? I may even start selling extras at some point. I had no idea it was this easy.

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I also attended a meeting of the local farmers market and they really are trying to get more vendors and are very supportive, namely through a very low entry price of $100 for the entire season that runs from May through October. My mushrooms continue to do well but I really need a couple more varieties to flesh out a good presentation.

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Today I started out Shiitake in my fruiting chamber and I am really hoping they do well, because they are a cool looking mushroom and they taste great. IF I can get these guys to produce consistently for me along with the other varieties I have somewhat nailed down, I think I am going to go for it and show at the farmers market. It could be a fun way to make a few extra thousand per year. We'll see.

Riggerjack
Posts: 2954
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:09 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack »

So how do you control fruiting of mushrooms?

I'm wondering if you could take some of the growing medium, implant it into some sterilized branch cuttings from your woods, and sell a small, decorative mushroom farm at the farmers market... Take waste growing medium, add waste wood, and sell at a premium, since then they are buying the freshest mushrooms possible, on demand.

Though I imagine many people would have issues growing mushrooms in their refrigerator or window sill....

ertyu
Posts: 1208
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2016 2:31 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ertyu »

how are the cats?

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@rigger

"So how do you control fruiting of mushrooms?"


You have to control for lighting, temperature, humidity, CO2, and fresh air exchange. You get any of those off for even a short time and your mushrooms will give you immediate feedback. Often as a stilted, or leggy ugly mushroom. Or they refuse to grow at all. I take pictures of the beautiful mushrooms, not the ugly ones. Haha, the ugly ones get chopped up and dehydrated of which there is a market for that too.

I am still learning what I can get away with for each type or variety. Some are more forgiving then others, and the problem I am encountering is trying to grow more than one variety in the same grow chamber. Because you have to push the conditional boundaries for each type to find a happy medium for all of them together. I am about to the point of setting up a second grow chamber just for that reason alone so I can optimize each environment for one particular mushroom.

The lighting is simply LED rope lights, the temperature is whatever my basement is providing as it is unconditioned ( it works fairly well), humidity is provided by ultrasonic fog producers pushed by a fan, and the CO2 and fresh air is balanced by another fan that is connected to fresh air and a timer. All of this is centered around a mini greenhouse setup.

People do sell homemade grow kits and I am thinking of doing those too. My idea would involve a simple mason jar that is ready to fruit with one of the forgiving mushrooms and a simple humidity tent (plastic bag). Put the tent over the mason jar, spray with a water bottle for humidity, and place in a cool, indirect lit place in your home. When the mushrooms are done growing, clean the jar and keep for future use. I think those would sell.




@ertyu

It just occurred to me your user name are five letters in a row on the keyboard. I'm not the quickest learner. haha

The mother cat has disappeared. She may come back around to eat but she's not in the barn when I visit. The three little ones have only just begun to stop hiding from me when I show up, but that's because I bring food. I doubt I will ever be able to pet any of them and we'll see how many stick around once they mature. At least none of them will ever reproduce.

I saw something the other day near the barn I have never seen before, a mink. At first I thought it was a weasel, but when I researched it later it was clearly a mink, as the coloration and size matched perfectly. Hopefully the cats are off-limits to a mink's diet, and they are just big enough now to probably escape an attack if it occurred. At least that is what I am hoping.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

I had a good day today as far as making progress. I have finally started on the foundation.

Last night Mother Nature decided to snow on us and I almost canceled todays plans because I just didn't know what the soil was gong to be like once we started digging and once you've rented the excavator then it's yours, whether it is used or not. My buddy made me make the judgement call and I said let's go for it, which turned out to be the right choice thankfully.

The footings call for 24 inches below the surface and you just don't realize how much dirt that is to remove until it starts. While my friend dug the trenches, I took the skid steer and moved the spoil pile to what is becoming a huge pile of dirt. I'm not quite sure what I am going to do with all of this fill dirt as I am certainly not going to need all of it to grade the yard once the buildings are up. On the plus side, I am becoming somewhat competent using the Kubota after moving dirt for hours today.

We started out laying out our lines with marking paint once enough snow had melted.

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And after a days worth of digging. Tomorrow we excavate the shop.

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ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

Quick update. Finished all of the digging and even had time to dig up old concrete encased fence posts which had rotted off. Very tired after two 10 hour days digging dirt. Rain comes back tonight. :(

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Riggerjack
Posts: 2954
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:09 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack »

Are you not installing a foundation drain? Digging a path to daylight makes rain and footings compatible. Gotta do that here, or we would have to wait for August to pour footings... Besides, avoiding humidity in a crawlspace is always a good idea.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@rigger

Oh yeah, after the stem walls are up was my plan. I didn't want to complicate the concrete pour with drainage ditches as the concrete truck is going to have to maneuver around the site. Hopefully the rain doesn't make me rue my decision, but I have access to a trash pump if it gets too bad. Or I cut in the drainage.

rube
Posts: 668
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:54 pm
Location: Europe (NL)

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by rube »

Are you going to pour the concrete straight in?
I am used to see something like on this picture over here, to keep the rebar in place, isolation and I guess limit the amount of concrete.
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Good luck with the building, I am following it with great interest!

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@rube

What you are showing above are forms for a poured concrete stem wall, which was an option I could have gone with, but the bid was $25,000 more than what I anticipate spending. It's a great wall system, but I can achieve the same structural strength through block walls. It is uglier however, and more porous, but the block will be covered in a stone veneer and the foundation wall will be waterproofed. And as rigger has inquired about, fully drained to evacuate any standing water.

Basically the trench is the form for the footings. It wastes some concrete due to unevenness of the side walls but it saves one from having to create forms with wood and stakes. That's a lot of work and material. Now upon the poured footing, which will be 10' by 24', I'll have the block layers build the wall.

Tomorrow we plan on installing the rebar after it dries up a little and hopefully we can pour on Friday. I'll have pictures which should clarify everything.







On an unrelated note, I am going to consider my experiment with the spent fruiting blocks on straw as a success. If the corona virus hits my part of the world, I think I can grow enough mushrooms to feed us into perpetuity. Haha


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ertyu
Posts: 1208
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2016 2:31 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ertyu »

These are some beautiful professional grade mushrooms. Mushrooms to be proud of. Congrats.

ffj
Posts: 2238
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj »

@ertyu

Thanks. I picked them the same day and gave them away. I'm just happy my experiment worked. ;)






Put the rebar in yesterday and today I set the grade stakes, which are the vertical pins. The concrete will be flush with the tops of these as they are all perfectly level with one another even though the ground is uneven. These rotary laser levels are pretty cool with what they allow you to accomplish.

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Tomorrow will be the concrete pour!

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