Fox's Journey: Out of the Burrow

Where are you and where are you going?
Crazylemon
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Re: Fox's Journey: Out of the Burrow

Post by Crazylemon » Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:53 pm

Best of luck whatever you choose.

But work shouldn't be 'horrible'. Not as amazing as doing exactly what you want is pretty much a given (100% overlap between work/play is very hard). Your latter point seems to recognise this a bit but if every day you are going to work hating it it won't be sustainable. As theanimal has said. It won't be sustainable. Even for the theoretical 2 years is might just take.

I say this also as one of the 'lucky/cursed' millennials who found this place while still in education.

Personally enjoyable but slower is my preferred method (easy to say having done the slower bit already). Even with a job which is 90% enjoyable I still have days where I think about just leaving. I can't imagine it day in day out. But maybe becoming accommodating to this and living my life around this is a step to far down the road to complacency for you.

My partner went through the same sort of soul searching as you after being let go from the high power job. Probably the best thing that happened in the end. His new work pays (nearly) as well and he actually likes work now.

An attempted sprint to the ERE finish while miserable the whole way would be a very fragile strategy, and not much fun.

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Kriegsspiel
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Re: Fox's Journey: Out of the Burrow

Post by Kriegsspiel » Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:55 pm

1. If you can make it more collegeiate (living cheaply/ERE and near friends) it isn't so bad.
2-7. Yea.

Although that doesn't necessarily mean to only go after the most well-paid job. I liked doing moderately well-paid blue collar work (surveying) than highest-potential-paying white collar financial type work (mortgage banker & corporate purchasing)

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Kriegsspiel
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Re: Fox's Journey: Out of the Burrow

Post by Kriegsspiel » Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:57 pm

Crazylemon wrote:
Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:53 pm
Word.

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TopHatFox
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Location: NY; 23

Re: Fox's Journey: Out of the Burrow

Post by TopHatFox » Wed Dec 06, 2017 5:16 pm

DEC 2017

Work: Completed two interviews earlier this week that pay at least 35K, and one that pays 55K tomorrow. Let's see which one(s) work out.

Van Living: I ended up sleeping in a Toyota Yaris at a campsite for the first time. Wasn't an issue at all. Plenty of covers for warmth. Even watched Finding Dori on C's iPad. There was a humidity issue, but I imagine that can be solved by leaving a window a bit open or just wiping down the windows with a squeegee. Still trying to figure out how van living would work while staying in a place full-time, rather than moving about from place to place.

Grad School: I've decided to bail on this idea. I don't want to spend any more time in education when the prospects of a job may still be dismal afterward. Same with spending assets down pay for it. It's a huge opportunity cost, similar to college.

Orthognathic Surgery: COBRA-continued health insurance eats up $750 a month (!), but I'd like to at least find out if jaw surgery may be covered this month or next. The alternative is to start from scratch with another insurance company on the public market. Braces would be another 6K. /:

Life Path: I'm still convinced that I don't want children, pets, or other dependents going forward. I've further decided that I can't or won't help out the parent's financially in their retirement years. Is what it is. I can help them most by just being there instead. Moreover, I am perfectly happy with a simple, inexpensive boat, room, van, or tent for the foreseeable future. As for food, simple and wholesome is best. And any labor that needs doing, I'd do. I want to adventure travel full-time for the foreseeable future, write about different trips, and possibly start a tiny house homestead. All of this doesn't require much financially. I could work like crazy and get to 500K-1M, but I don't see the point. I could die during year 1 of adventure travel full-time. No, instead, I'm going to save around 200K and just go. I think this is the best approach. It avoids superfluous full-time work, but also allows an asset-backed cushion. I have been happiest in my life while hiking a trail or hanging out outside a vehicle by a roaring fire. In the meantime, I'll go on local hikes and campsites. I'll also make sure to keep in touch with friends and previous partners. I do think the biggest risk with this approach is healthcare. I'll need decent health insurance, and to take excellent care of my body and mental health. It also means I need to practice as many good safety practices as I can.

Musings: I fail to see the point of life besides just spending time with people you care about, experiencing/doing interesting things, and completing meaningful work. For me, that means helping environmental causes and having lots of time to adventure travel. It means spending time with close friends and partners. I am having trouble visualizing what else there is to life besides these things: good food, water, shelter, safety, financial security, a strong social network, and meaningful work. One really doesn't need much to achieve these, so...what else is there to do? What else is there to spend money on, really? (I'm ruling philanthropy out since there are foundations that already do that).

Society in Decline: If we are indeed a civilization in decline, I'd like to see all the things there are to see while they're still there to see. I would still like shelter and good food while I'm at it, so I see the purpose of saving up an asset base for a while. Here's to making the accumulation phase as much an adventure as possible.

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Networth: 64K

classical_Liberal
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Re: Fox's Journey: Out of the Burrow

Post by classical_Liberal » Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:24 pm

TopHatFox wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 5:16 pm
I could work like crazy and get to 500K-1M, but I don't see the point. I could die during year 1 of adventure travel full-time. No, instead, I'm going to save around 200K and just go. I think this is the best approach. It avoids superfluous full-time work, but also allows an asset-backed cushion.
I like this plan because:

1) It forces you to stick with a job for at least 2-3 years. This is good, often the first year at a job is the toughest. You start to feel more like you're contributing after that initial period and become more competent, which intern raises satisfaction.

2) Your feelings toward your work will have large impact on your decision to bail at 200K. If you, at least, somewhat enjoy your job, I would venture to guess you will become a bit more conservative financially. If you very much dislike it, you can still jump ship per plan.

3) Make sure you draw a hard "line in the sand" re financial stability if you bail at 200K. IOW, have a plan, if inflation adjusted assets fall to "x", you must find ways to rectify immediately. I had to restart my life with zero at age 32, while it was kind-of invigorating, the whole process would have felt better with 100K as back up. I find it highly unlikely a mid-20's ERE'er will never find ways to contribute to society again ;you'll likely earn more money anyway, but better to have this line in place.

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bryan
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Re: Fox's Journey: Out of the Burrow

Post by bryan » Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:19 am

TopHatFox wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 5:16 pm
Musings: I fail to see the point of life besides just spending time with people you care about, experiencing/doing interesting things, and completing meaningful work. For me, that means helping environmental causes and having lots of time to adventure travel. It means spending time with close friends and partners. I am having trouble visualizing what else there is to life besides these things: good food, water, shelter, safety, financial security, a strong social network, and meaningful work. One really doesn't need much to achieve these, so...what else is there to do? What else is there to spend money on, really? (I'm ruling philanthropy out since there are foundations that already do that).
Regarding "what else there is to life," certainly throughout your life feelings will ebb and flow as you achieve new states. I suppose one tip may be to fight inertia, generally.. For instance, a young brilliant scientist/engineer might go through a typical ERE accumulation phase (a few years of anticipating "the number") and just as ta hits it, ta somewhat realizes that in ta's position at the corporation, ta has some nice control of vast resources that would be all but impossible if ta were tinkering in ta's garage. All of a sudden ta may want to give up some independence for some bigger cause? Or maybe not? At least ta will start thinking more about that..

Your voice there reminds a little of "Father and Son" by Cat Stevens.. you being the son. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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