Western Red Cedar's Journal

Where are you and where are you going?
Western Red Cedar
Posts: 303
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:15 pm

Re: Western Red Cedar's Journal

Post by Western Red Cedar »

@Stasher - this was actually my first Rich Roll podcast. I was impressed by his research and interview style. I'll have to check out more episodes as I know he gets some big names on his podcast.

AxelHeyst
Posts: 592
Joined: Thu Jan 09, 2020 4:55 pm
Location: The Mountains, USA

Re: Western Red Cedar's Journal

Post by AxelHeyst »

All this talk about long rides is making me reconsider my resolution to sell my Capra. Maybe I'll just fix it up a bit and go for a couple rides for old times' sake before making the final call...

Western Red Cedar
Posts: 303
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:15 pm

Re: Western Red Cedar's Journal

Post by Western Red Cedar »

AxelHeyst wrote:
Sat Apr 03, 2021 2:35 pm
All this talk about long rides is making me reconsider my resolution to sell my Capra. Maybe I'll just fix it up a bit and go for a couple rides for old times' sake before making the final call...
That certainly sounds like a good idea to me. I"m typically in a great headspace when I'm out on rides. Cycling has been a great reinforcer for my mindfulness and meditation practices as I tend to be present for long periods when I'm on a bike.

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Lemur
Posts: 990
Joined: Sun Jun 12, 2016 1:40 am

Re: Western Red Cedar's Journal

Post by Lemur »

Good luck with your new opportunity! I'm still finding my footing and comfortability in my new role as well. I love the autonomy, leadership, and free reign of creative control rather then having to follow someone else's checklists. I used to have all sorts of ideas as the worker bee but never wanted to implement because that would always just mean more work - but now as the leader, you kind of get motivated to build your project/product the way you want; almost like a video game in a weird way...The cons is the politics, people managing, and that constant feeling of low-level stress which in itself may or may not be harmful; your day will fly at least. At least that has been my experience.

Being close to FI makes you question the "why" so much. I somewhat understand this. I could just do a "CoastFI" or "Semi-ERE" via financial numbers alone ... but we're personally seeing so much inflow of cash we don't want to do anything to slow that trend down.

I think the conversation you had with your supervisor was a tough one to have. Something I'll need to get better at as well. I had a customer presentation today and a few of my colleagues bailed on the meeting (just didn't show up wtf) so I had to present in there place with 40 or so individuals on the zoom .... so it went kinda awkwardly - so another skill to add, thinking on your feet...but also strange world where we can't sometimes make people accountable due to various people politics or lack of influence. In my situation, almost everyone I work with I've never met in real life.

ertyu
Posts: 1680
Joined: Sun Nov 13, 2016 2:31 am

Re: Western Red Cedar's Journal

Post by ertyu »

Western Red Cedar wrote:
Fri Apr 02, 2021 8:06 pm
he supported my belief (unorthodox around here) that larger policy change is more appropriate to address those issues. I think folks underestimate how significantly we can move the needle through policy, rather than bottom-up change.
I would say this is a misrepresentation of "what people here believe" -- assuming one can say that people here believe a monolithical set of things to start with. I don't think anyone disagrees that larger policy change is more appropriate and can move the needle more. There is little argument about this: the largest polluters are corporate + military. The way to reign in corporate is through gvt regulation, if not at the national then at the supranational level.

The problem isn't that people don't believe this is the most effective way. Rather, they believe that even though it's the most effective way, it's not gonna happen. And given that it's not gonna happen, the best you can do is level up on your ERE akillz, or as (I think?) Axel Heyst said, git good at being poor.

Western Red Cedar
Posts: 303
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:15 pm

Re: Western Red Cedar's Journal

Post by Western Red Cedar »

@Lemur - thanks for the feedback and thoughts. I'll be interested to hear your perspective as your project progresses. I'm technically about 9 months into mine, but it's only really started picking up in the last 5 months.
Lemur wrote:
Mon Apr 05, 2021 7:41 pm
Being close to FI makes you question the "why" so much. I somewhat understand this. I could just do a "CoastFI" or "Semi-ERE" via financial numbers alone ... but we're personally seeing so much inflow of cash we don't want to do anything to slow that trend down.
Very true, my household is in the same boat right now.

Western Red Cedar
Posts: 303
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 2:15 pm

Re: Western Red Cedar's Journal

Post by Western Red Cedar »

ertyu wrote:
Wed Apr 07, 2021 12:39 pm
I would say this is a misrepresentation of "what people here believe" -- assuming one can say that people here believe a monolithical set of things to start with. I don't think anyone disagrees that larger policy change is more appropriate and can move the needle more. There is little argument about this

The problem isn't that people don't believe this is the most effective way. Rather, they believe that even though it's the most effective way, it's not gonna happen. And given that it's not gonna happen, the best you can do is level up on your ERE akillz, or as (I think?) Axel Heyst said, git good at being poor.

I think this is a fair rebuttal. I spent a while reading this thread again this morning and the beliefs are clearly more nuanced. They are certainly not monolithic. The post was probably a partial response to @Jacob's addressing top-down vs. bottom-up in a recent podcast (the Stoa?) as well as a fairly dominant trend in the dialogue to give up on policy solutions.

viewtopic.php?f=20&t=11677

I'm not at the point of considering policy solutions as an oxymoron. I think the lack of an international consensus on policy approaches over the last 30-40 years is primarily the result of a few major players dragging their feet or refusing to substantively engage. I also think just giving up on policy solutions (national or international) and focusing on skills is somewhat analogous to the elite buying bunkers in New Zealand.*

The reason I linked to the Honnold interview is that he captured my thinking on the balance between bottom-up and top-down solutions to climate change so well. It's really important to make individual changes and those do have an impact, but there are much larger gains to be made through changes at a larger scale. The optimist in me has to disagree that they won't happen. It's probably more of a question about when they will happen, what level of crisis will really force them to happen, and how late to the game we will be.

*I tread very carefully in openly diverging from @Jacob's opinions on climate change (and geopolitics) in the forum. It's a bit like picking a street fight with Connor McGregor or Mike Tyson.

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