Hristo's FI Journal

Where are you and where are you going?
ZAFCorrection
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by ZAFCorrection »

Whether or not people are self centered is probably not discernable without being up close. Just about everyone says they aren't and has some dialogue about how what they are doing is altruistic in some way.

I'd say the big difference between your attitude, Hristo, and others is a focus on altruism and engagement with people immediately around you vs altruism and engagement in some more abstract sense or further away from home. The rational/introverted style seems to include a heavy focus on optimizing one's immediate surroundings (7w5 keeps referring to some zone thing I never remember), to the exclusion of basically everyone who can't be fit into some kind of lifestyle design. But that doesn't mean they aren't leaving the fortress of solitude to do some good work. Or maybe that is just a rationalization. I don't think it is possible to judge without really knowing the person.

LiberateMind
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by LiberateMind »

I think I’m finally growing tired of the egocentric and self-centered focus of some of what I’m seeing on this forum. Do something to be useful to your sister and brother. --- What’s WL10? It’s some guy positively contributing to his community by employing people, supporting families, providing goods or services his local community actually wants and needs, and doing it virtuously. Savings rate, withdrawal rates, “robustness” rates, those are all just metrics by which non-doers can measure themselves to feel good about their non-doing and their leechnessness....
You think I don’t know that I could abandon my family and my church and my colleagues and clients and go live in a F’ing van and never have to work again? That makes me some sort of Buddha? An “enlightened one”? What about duty, fidelity? What about virtue? What about being called for some higher purpose than just figuring out how to feed and shelter and entertain myself?

Figure out what skills and abilities God granted you, and figure out how you can use those skills and abilities to benefit your brothers and sisters, to be useful. There’s an “end” for you; an ultimate purpose. It sure as shit makes more sense than “chopping wood, carrying water.”
That is quiet some post, I wonder what triggered it. I think living is other peoples labor is occurs in many ways, via capitalism investment, via inheritance, via corporate career as well . Self centered people would be there in every environment irrespective of where we are, even inside family structure. I like to think of ERE as it is offering a degree of freedom from money , so that we can make life choices without thinking about money. Or standing up for your values without fearing how your family will do without the paycheck.

7Wannabe5
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

One way to think about it is that even in highly religious setting some people are more likely to be pastors while others are more likely to be monks.

I am not an artisan :lol: I am an old rational female with tertiary FE who already raised her own family and who has been working part-time in settings not unlike “To Call the Midwife” for the last 4 or 5 years. So, I would also note that just because the bleached blonde character of Trixie likes to have fun doesn’t preclude her from also doing good work in her community. I am willing to bet that I have changed 3x as many lifetime cumulative diapers as you ;) :lol:

Scott 2
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by Scott 2 »

From what I've observed, people who manage to FIRE/ERE, don't anchor on a life of leisure. There might be an indulgent transition period, but they tend to grow discontent. Over a couple years, they find some way to productively re-engage with society. With money as a solved problem, it's often a more worthwhile pursuit.

For some (myself!), I think this is a necessary path. We get so hung up on the idea of being trapped in corporate America, that the way through has to be out.

Any model is necessarily limited. I wouldn't put too much emphasis on the Wheaton level thread, especially if it isn't serving you personally.

Hristo Botev
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by Hristo Botev »

I reject Plato’s Cave, and I think The Matrix is a lot of BS. “This” is what is really real.

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Alphaville
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by Alphaville »

Hristo Botev wrote:
Wed Apr 07, 2021 9:34 pm
I reject Plato’s Cave, and I think The Matrix is a lot of BS. “This” is what is really real.
i reject plato altogether, and i'm surprised to see you've gone zen. the matrix is just entertainment.

but what would you say if i told you there are jesuit and benedictine zen practitioners?

i know i swore i'd never comment here again. but this is too juicy. :lol:

have fun down this rabbit hole though:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Enomiya-Lassalle
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willigis_Jäger

adios amigo 🖖

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fiby41
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by fiby41 »

Mythos is cognate for mithya.
sat existent/exists.
jagat world.
brahma highest principle/god

Full 2*2 matrix is:

brahma sat jagat mithya
God is permanent, the world is transient.

brahma sat jagat sat
The tangible world and sense-objects are a construct of the senses.

brahma mithya jagat sat
This world is real there is nothing more than what meets the eye.

brahma mithya jagat mithya
Nihilism

ertyu
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by ertyu »

a fascinating person. wow.

Hristo Botev
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by Hristo Botev »

Yesterday was a good day: Lifted heavy weights in the morning; did 8 hours of good work at the office (and helped to settle a particularly not-fun-to-work-on lawsuit that I was NOT looking forward to trying this summer); planted some pumpkins a friend from church gave me; jump-started and changed the tire on the car of a neighbor who is particularly stretched thin at the moment, b/c I figured that would be easier and less time consuming than trying to keep my fellow HOA Board members from voting to fine her at our monthly meeting for parking a non-functioning car on property (relatedly, showed my son how to jump start a car and change a tire); helped organize a fundraiser and community event being put on by my Catholic men's group; enjoyed dinner with my family and a cocktail with my wife, followed by evening prayers with the family and then about an hour of truly mindless TV with DW, in the form of Bravo's "Below Deck"; then finished reading "Nomadland" in bed, and frankly, I wish I'd spent that time watching more "Below Deck," as I'm finding more and more that what would probably be a really good long-form article often doesn't get better by being stretched out to book length--I get it, the S is already H-ing TF.

Note to self: I want to read Yukio Mishima's "Sun and Steel."

Hristo Botev
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by Hristo Botev »

2 weeks into the StartingStrength novice linear progression lifting program, and man, I should have done this a long, long time ago. So far it seems to be the exact right amount of reps and sets, so I'm not overly fatigued/sore and can actually function physically (playing/coaching sports with the kids, home/yard/garden work, etc.) in between workouts. I also find that I really look forward to workouts, in part because it's just a great feeling to lift heavy things, and also because it doesn't feel like some sort of self-torture/flagellation that running or even HIIT workouts has always felt like for me. I know it'll get harder as the weight gets progressively heavier, but presumably my body will be adapting along the way. I also like that, because it's only 3 exercises per workout, I can finish in 30-45 minutes, even with the warm-up sets. It's also amazing to me that, at least for now, I am consistently putting 5lbs more on the bar every 2 days; the human body's adaptability really is an amazing thing, even over the age of 40. I'm also walking taller and just generally feeling better. And focusing on strength gains, and nothing else, is really helpful for me, as I've already found that I'm starting to make changes in other, related areas to facilitate the strength gain goal--e.g., not drinking the evening/night before a workout; making sure I consistently get a decent breakfast rather than skipping that meal; avoiding the junk-food-type meals that make me feel sluggish, knowing that I've got to put 5 more lbs on the bar the next morning or the next.

Who knows, perhaps it'll have taken me 40 years to realize I'm a meathead.

If anyone is interested and doesn't know how Google works, workout A is 3x5 squat and press, and 1x5 deadlift; and workout B is 3x5 squat and bench press, and 1x5 deadlift; and you alternate workouts with 24-48 hours rest or so in between (so MWF, or TRSa). And you add 5lbs or 2.5 lbs each workout to your work sets for each lift, until you can't anymore, at which point you are no longer a "beginner" novice, and you have to start mixing things up a bit, provided your linear progression hasn't failed for some other reason (stress at work, not enough sleep, poor eating, etc.).

white belt
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by white belt »

@Hristo

I'm glad you are enjoying Starting Strength. The novice linear progression was my introduction to lifting as well. I think it is a great beginner program because it builds consistency and keeps things relatively simple. After spending 3-6 months on it you will have built up the habit of lifting weights along with some technical proficiency, so you can then move on to other programs that may be more appropriate for your goals.

Enjoy the newbie gains while you have them because they won't last forever. What I found is that that SSLP towards the end can become quite a meat grinder as your body becomes more and more fatigued. Beginners can make a lot of progress without building up significant fatigue because they are limited by their lack of strength. You will find at a certain point that your body can no longer recover from workout to workout, which is when more complex fatigue management becomes necessary (I know this is covered in the SS book, but in my experience SSLP often goes on a bit too long and you end up accumulating a ton of fatigue in the last few weeks/months for tiny gains).

But for now, I recommend keeping things simple and continuing to follow the program for at least a few months. Once you have the habit of following a lifting program ingrained, I recommend checking out more intermediate/advanced texts that cover things like periodization: https://www.jtsstrength.com/scientific- ... -training/

Dave
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Re: Hristo's FI Journal

Post by Dave »

+1 for Starting Strength being a great program that works as advertised. It took me to the 1,000 pound club after ~6 months of the program starting with no squat or deadlift experience and a weak bench.
white belt wrote:
Thu Apr 15, 2021 12:29 pm
What I found is that that SSLP towards the end can become quite a meat grinder as your body becomes more and more fatigued. Beginners can make a lot of progress without building up significant fatigue because they are limited by their lack of strength. You will find at a certain point that your body can no longer recover from workout to workout, which is when more complex fatigue management becomes necessary (I know this is covered in the SS book, but in my experience SSLP often goes on a bit too long and you end up accumulating a ton of fatigue in the last few weeks/months for tiny gains).
This matches my experience. It gets brutal towards the end, and as @white belt said focusing on recovery (diet and sleep) in this phase is critical. But the beginning is amazing as you can keep adding weight to the bar and watch your lifts rocket for a period of time.

Enjoy Hristo, keep us posted with your progress!

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