Share your recipes

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flying_pan
Posts: 117
Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2019 4:06 am
Location: USA, Oregon

Re: Share your recipes

Post by flying_pan »

I have bunch of recipes I developed over time which I eat almost exclusively (I cook for myself like 95% time, and I don't like restaurants and HATE fast food). I am a vegan, so they don't have meat or fish.

First, let me share my pasta salad. I made it by myself, although I am pretty sure Italian or French cuisine has it for long time.

So, we will need:

- crushed walnuts (optional, if you don't like them)
- green onions
- tomatoes
- spinach
- green olives (I like stuffed with pepper)
- sun-dried tomatoes (optional)
- lemon juice
- pasta
- salt
- olive oil

Looks like a lot of ingredients!

So, first, crush your walnuts. Not to complete powder, but to smaller chunks. Put them into a bowl. Next, cut some green onions. Cut tomatoes into small pieces (smaller the better). Cut olives, I cut to quarters usually.

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Now, cut spinach. Also, the smaller pieces are the better. Add salt; it is a crucial ingredient, so you have to put a lot, but to your taste, of course. Sprinkle some lemon juice, add sun-dried tomatoes and put some olive oil.

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During this cutting process, boil some water and start to make pasta. I don't think there is a big difference in using different types of pasta, but if you use spaghetti, break them into 3 pieces, so that they are not super long. After they are done, put them into salad (hot pasta is fine, no need to cool down), add a bit more salt and olive oil, and mix well.

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That's it! I am a vegan, so no cheese for me, but if you eat milk products, I'd try to add goat cheese to it (should be great). Alternatively, you can cut small square pieces of harder cheese, like Emmentaler, but not too hard (I don't think Parmigiano will work well here). These are just my suggestions, though :lol:

Seppia
Posts: 1472
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:34 am
Location: Italy

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia »

if I may, I would suggest trying the following tweaks:

- boil the pasta in salted water (see details for salt quantity in one of the prior posts in this thread), you'll be able to avoid adding the salt later and will end up with a more uniform taste
- boil the pasta for 2/3 of the suggested cooking time, drain it, mix it with the other ingredients and let it cool down at room temp by mixing/turning frequently. it will complete cooking by itself, and will suck in flavor from the sauce while doing so. You should be able to get a better "al dente" and less breakage
- penne rigate is the strongest cut of short pasta stucturally.

flying_pan
Posts: 117
Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2019 4:06 am
Location: USA, Oregon

Re: Share your recipes

Post by flying_pan »

Seppia wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 9:58 am
if I may, I would suggest trying the following tweaks:

- boil the pasta in salted water (see details for salt quantity in one of the prior posts in this thread), you'll be able to avoid adding the salt later and will end up with a more uniform taste
- boil the pasta for 2/3 of the suggested cooking time, drain it, mix it with the other ingredients and let it cool down at room temp by mixing/turning frequently. it will complete cooking by itself, and will suck in flavor from the sauce while doing so. You should be able to get a better "al dente" and less breakage
- penne rigate is the strongest cut of short pasta stucturally.
I definitely boil pasta in salted water (my bad on omitting it). But your suggestion about cooking it 2/3 through and then turning it frequently to complete cooking sounds great! I'll try it today.

> penne rigate is the strongest cut of short pasta structurally

Sorry for my ignorance, but what does it affect? From my experience spaghetti makes the best salad, but I am currently trying different styles.

Seppia
Posts: 1472
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:34 am
Location: Italy

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia »

flying_pan wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 10:22 am
Sorry for my ignorance, but what does it affect? From my experience spaghetti makes the best salad, but I am currently trying different styles.
Just the aesthetics of not having broken pieces of pasta. Higher quality pasta* also breaks less often than cheap pasta.
I was saying "short cuts" because if you break spaghetti they are obviously structurally very strong.
Short cuts have the additional benefit that you need less grams to fill the plates/bowls, which can be useful for people with a tendency to overeat like me, or if you run a restaurant (people eat with their eyes, so will be more satisfied with a 125g dish of penne than with a 150g dish of spaghetti).

*In the USA, the best bang for buck available are De Cecco, Molisana, Barilla (listed in terms of absolute quality)

jacob
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by jacob »

So whenever I break a fist full of "Great Value Spaghetti" in two straight down the middle into the pot with my clubbell enhanced grip, I'm pretty much getting the maximum negative points available in your book? Like the entire nation of Italy literally feels [a] disturbance in the pasta force? :mrgreen:

Seppia
Posts: 1472
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:34 am
Location: Italy

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia »

Every time you do that, an Italian cook dies somewhere
:cry:

Seriously speaking, my philosophy in cooking is to only buy high quality ingredients, then save money by shifting what I eat towards cheaper categories (expensive organic beans are cheaper than cheap low quality steak).

While cheap whole foods are usually just terrible tasting, in the case even lightly processed foods like pasta the cheapness can lead to unhealthiness.
Ie cheap cheap pasta is usually dried at very high temperatures (to speed up the production process) and contains much higher percentages of ash VS a higher quality, slow dried pasta.

I already put my body through a lot of stress because of my job, so at least I try to get the best quality fuel possible.

reepicheep
Posts: 360
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2014 7:45 am

Re: Share your recipes

Post by reepicheep »

Bacon Dates

Take dried dates. Remove pit if necessary. Stuff with goat cheese. Almonds also tasty. Wrap in bacon. Suggest cutting bacon piece in half, 50% of piece per date is plenty. Bake at 350F until crispy and delicious.

This is my one and only party trick, other than guacamole.

Bonus decadence: dip cooled bacon dates into tempered chocolate.

MikeBalst1
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Location: New York, USA
Contact:

Re: Share your recipes

Post by MikeBalst1 »

Cool recipe! I am a bachelor and cook food by myself. Most of all I like to cook meat. I should definitely try your recipe, it looks very appetizing :)

Seppia
Posts: 1472
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:34 am
Location: Italy

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia »

Boiling is, in my opinion, a very underrated way of cooking meat.

I found some pork shanks for sale

First, prepare some carrots, celery and an onion.

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Stick a couple cloves inside the onion like so, they will add flavor to the broth.

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Throw in a large pot with COLD water and bring to a boil.

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After a good 20 minutes of boiling, add the shanks.

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A couple hours later, voila

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You can also take them out and finish them under the grill in case.

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I love boiling because it keeps the meat flavor very “clean”, the meat becomes nice and tender, and you use zero fats.

Other cuts of meat that work fantastic:
Short ribs (beef)
Veal shoulder
Any cut that is a bit fat.

If not using pork, you’ll also end up with a phenomenal broth.

Alphaville
Posts: 1402
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Alphaville »

This isn’t my recipe, but I make these refried beans on the regular. Made them today actually:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/201 ... beans.html

Only mod is I have hard water, so 1/2 tsp baking soda in the cooking water helps with the bean texture.

Alphaville
Posts: 1402
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

STREAMLINED GRANOLA

Post by Alphaville »

After years of simplification I've arrived to this recipe. I hope it comes handy. Makes about 3qt/3L

TOOLS (preferred first, make do in parentheses; everything listed in detail for minimalists considering “things”)

-1 half-sheet size baking pan, 18"x13"/46x33cm (can be a smaller but deeper roast pan, or multiple smaller sheets)
-baking mat to fit (can also use parchment, we want to avoid sticking to the pan)
-cooling rack (nice but not essential, over the sink works too)
-2 mixing bowls at least 2qt each (pots and pans also work)
-Measuring cup, half cup, teaspoon (you can do whatever keeps proportions)
-mixing spoon/paddle
-wire whisk or other agitator for liquids (fork?)
-oven (I've made granola in a pot, with constant stirring, you could if you want to)
-a timer with minutes (phone works)
-kitchen towels or oven mitts for removal
-widemouth storage container 3qt/3L minimum.

INGREDIENTS [you could make any amount if you keep ot proportional]

-4 cups/1000cc [parts] rolled oats (regular not quick)
-4 cups/1000cc [parts] raw nuts and seeds (I use 2 cups shredded coconut 2 cups pumpkin seed; chia works, sunflower works, almonds work, peanuts work**, walnuts* work, pecans work, rinsed quinoa can work, etc)
-1/2 cups/125cc [parts] oil (I use melted coconut; olive oil works, melted butter works, all works)
-1/2 cups/125cc [parts] sweetener (I use honey; maple syrup, brown rice or whatever else you like works)
-Powdered spices [to taste] (I use 2tsp powdered cinnamon; cardamom works great too especially with honey+olive oil but you need to go easy on this spice)
-Liquid flavorings [to taste], (I like 2tsp Molina vanilla: fake but good; you could use almond extract, orange flavor, maple, etc.)
-.75 to 1.5 tsp [to taste] coarse salt (low range if using coarse sea salt, high range if using flaky like maldon)

STEPS

Mix dry ingredients EXCEPT FOR THE SALT in one bowl; whisk liquids in another bowl.
Pour dry ingredients into the liquids bowl, mix.
Spread onto sheet over baking mat/parchment.
Sprinkle coarse salt over surface
Bake for 30' at 300F/150C * If using walnuts bake at 275F/135C so they don't over-toast. ** never tried raw peanuts, lightly roasted peanuts hold fine to 30' bake; check early
Let cool / solidify
Break up and store.


NOTES

tsp is teaspoons.

If you measure the oil first the sweetener slides right out of the same cup afterwards.

Adjust ingredients to your nutritional preferences. I use the minimal sweetener to make it sticky, add more for large clumps. I like coconut oil for short chain aminoacids, shredded coconut for taste and fiber, pumpkin seed for high protein.

The coarse salt is added on top to avoid dissolving it. Rather than have salty granola you want a nice spark of salt among the sweet clumps. Beware of salt grain structure which can greatly alter density. I should have weighted it.

Times may need to be adjusted depending on your oven and baking container. Best to check early than overtoast. 5min intervals work if oven is not too hot.

* Again, if using walnuts, bake at 275F/135C

** Again, never made it with raw peanuts, and wouldn’t either: but lightly roasted peanuts (eg Planter's) hold fine with the baking time, just check on them early.

Some people use dried fruit, which is added right after baking and folds into cooling. I find it too sweet, but your beetus may vary. Instead of dried fruit I eat it with yogurt and blueberries.

The pot cooking method is more laborious than baking and risks burning, but it's doable if you pay attention. I would probably start by toasting the drys first and then adding the liquids. I can't tell you times/temps but if you need data the truth is out there.

Enjoy daily.
Last edited by Alphaville on Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.

basuragomi
Posts: 142
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2019 3:13 pm

Re: Share your recipes

Post by basuragomi »

If we're making the Italians cry anyways:

Microwave pasta:

This recipe takes the normal pasta cooking process (boiling) and separates it into a two step process of first rehydrating then cooking the pasta. This allows for individual portions to be conveniently cooked in a microwave. It takes much longer overall than boiling but requires less attentive work, wastes less potable water, and uses far less power. It also generates less moisture/waste heat than boiling.

Take 85g dry pasta - thinner, smaller, open shapes like rotini or shells work best - and add to a ~750mL bowl.

Add cold water until dry pasta is covered with 1 cm of water, ~500mL. Add salt if you want. Stir to remove air bubbles. Cover the bowl.

Soak for at least two hours. If using flatter shapes, stir once or twice to prevent clumping. The pasta will swell to cooked size, change colour to white and become soft and elastic.

The pasta has fully rehydrated. Now it needs to be cooked.

Microwave covered on full power for three minutes. Be prepared for the water to boil over, though it should be right on the edge of boiling. Practice makes perfect.

Drain, add toppings and eat.

Frita
Posts: 594
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:43 pm

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Frita »

@basuragomi
I can see the utility of this method if traveling, staying in a hotel, with access to only a microwave (and coffee pot and iron) for cooking. Without your rehydration step, it takes forever to cook really gross tasting pasta. When in this situation, I often just bring along a rice cooker and skip the pasta. I’ll give it a try on our next ski trip (My spouse refuses to travel in the van during the winter.) with a hotel stay.

Seppia
Posts: 1472
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:34 am
Location: Italy

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia »

Since I am bored at home due to mandated smartworking, I experimented a bit.
Found a cheap pumpkin at the grocery shop and made some pumpkin gnocchi

Cut and clean the pumpkin
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Place in the oven at around 180C for somewhere between 40 mins and 1 hour.
This is the result you want:
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Squash it with a fork
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Add flour and a bit of salt, mix till you get a dough that is sticky but solid enough that you can you can work on it with spoons
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Fry some sage in butter, in a pan
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Prepare some salted, boiling water.
With the help of two spoons, make some sort of balls and dump them straight into the water
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The gnocchi are cooked when they surface
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Sautee' in the butter/sage
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Add parmigiano cheese, and voila' (sorry for the horrible light in the pic)
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Seppia
Posts: 1472
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2016 9:34 am
Location: Italy

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia »

bigato wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 8:07 am
I’m pretty sure Seppia will have an stroke when he reads the above.
My eyes just pretended they never saw the post. It’s been there for almost a month but I’ve yet to acknowledge its existence

Alphaville
Posts: 1402
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Alphaville »

just made a quick “prepper paté” (rich in b12 and iron) using

1lb butter
1sweet onion
3lb chicken livers, cleaned
splash of wine/leftover vodka, scotch (for the finish)
dahs of dry herbs (basil)

unlike technical “gourmet” recipes with small batches and refined flavors i did this by

-nearly caramelizing the onion in butter, taking it out
-adding more butter to the pan and frying the chopped liver in batches
-throwing all back in, adding wine + vodka (don’t have port at hand) + dried hebs
-adding the rest of the butter
-covering and cooking in slow fire till all dark
-adding salt and black pepper
-throwing the whole thing into the food processor
-adding a splash of scotch as a sacrifice to the gourmet gods

now i have a 1qt box of the thing cooling down. might freeze some. not for long because fat doesn’t freeze well.

the beauty of cobalamin (b12) is that it’s stored in the liver, in large amounts. it’s the body’s way to prepare for famine after a feast.

not to be paranoid or anything but i plan to feast on this in coming days, and then i can be ready to go vegan/vegetarian for months if need be.

Alphaville
Posts: 1402
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Alphaville »

sore throat gimlet:

in a cocktail tin drop:

juice of 2 limes, strained (ok if not if you don't mind the pulp)
1 oz honey
2-4oz gin (depending on how you're feeling)

cover and shake.

then add a couple of biggish ice cubes

then shake shake shake again

strain onto 2 frozen glasses

you can gargle if you wanna

Clarice
Posts: 267
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2017 4:45 pm
Location: California

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Clarice »

Hi to ERE cooks,
I, quite by accident, came into possession of lupini beans. Internet recipes vary widely on the topic of soaking - anywhere between 2-3 days and 2-3 weeks. The recipes are few, mainly salads. If anyone had any personal experience with them I would appreciate the advice. :?

Loner
Posts: 152
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2017 2:26 pm

Re: Share your recipes

Post by Loner »

Seppia, just a word of thanks for sharing that pumpkin gnocchi recipe. I tried it with a buttercup squash. It was delicious. Such a great use for squash.

oldbeyond
Posts: 252
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2012 10:43 pm

Re: Share your recipes

Post by oldbeyond »

Some ERE compatible ideas for incorporating more plant based-protein into your diet. My wife is not all that keen on rice and beans, but I've found a few things that she will happily eat. More strategies than recipes:

- Seeds - sunflower, melon seeds, pumpkin seeds etc. Cheap, quite nutritious and with a lot of energy (fat). Can be eaten as is, dry roasted (in a pan or in the oven) or roasted in oil. We mainly eat them in salads, or with sautéed vegetables (zucchini, eggplant, tomatoes, onions, kale, peppers - whatever is available) and pasta.

- Chickpeas can also be used in the same manner. We've also used it as topping for vegetable based soups.

- Nuts also work as per above.

- "Lentil bolognese". Lentils aren't a favorite either, but this variety at least get's accepted. Lentils are boiled with onions, grated turnips or carrots and som spices (chilies, some herbs, a bit of vinegar, tomato paste). Once they're soft, I mush them further, leaving some pieces for chunkiness, by using a handmixer and then add some cream (I use the real stuff, but one can of course opt for a plant based alternative).

- We do a couscous dish were we sauté some onions, add tomato paste, spices and chopped almonds. Works with seeds/chickpeas/nuts as per above or with cheese/meat if you prefer.

- As for beans, I sauté onions, zucchini and tomatoes with Mexican spices and add kidney beans and let it stew for a few minutes. This is usually quite popular served with tortillas or a pita bread.

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