Mini-retirements vs ERE?

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7Wannabe5
Posts: 6914
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:03 am

Re: Mini-retirements vs ERE?

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

I think it’s worth noting change in expenses when working/transitioning for comparative purposes. For instance, 2 consecutive 8 hour work days might “cost” more or less than 4 half days, etc.

Frita
Posts: 632
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:43 pm

Re: Mini-retirements vs ERE?

Post by Frita »

@c_L and @Jean
I am curious if the cost of transitions is in part due to transport from/back to homebase or based on the season. In the winter our expenses increase for heat and driving to ski. In the summer, utilities drop off to base charge and one can mountain bike from home. If we transitioned to a different climate in the winter, I could see the cost being a wash.

classical_Liberal
Posts: 2149
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 6:05 am

Re: Mini-retirements vs ERE?

Post by classical_Liberal »

Frita wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 12:00 pm
@c_L and @Jean
I am curious if the cost of transitions is in part due to transport from/back to homebase or based on the season.
Not for me. Seasonal changes to utilities are negligible in the housing situation I currently have. I didn't move at all this past year, although there is a slight commuting cost increase while working (maybe $50/mo), but that is stable throughout the working period.

I did travel a lot right after a work stint, so this is a contributor. Mostly poorly planned consumer-type travel trips too, travel hacked rather than travel planned. Because I just wanted to get away, so I feel this is mostly post work freedom and YOLO psychological changes.
7Wannabe5 wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:43 am
I think it’s worth noting change in expenses when working/transitioning for comparative purposes. For instance, 2 consecutive 8 hour work days might “cost” more or less than 4 half days, etc.
Right. There may even be further cost savings, not increased spending, if you find the right mix of work/off time for your personal flow. Because I think a job can provide situations in which you're getting paid to satisfy some desire/need that you'd otherwise spend to obtain.

This is harder than it seems. Rather, it's time and energy consuming. To find the right work, in the right amounts, at the right times to fit into your life. Just because I haven't yet found the right mix, doesn't mean I won't. Although it's easy to fall into the trap of just shutting up and working for three months to get paid for the year, rather than continually trying to refine this mix. I also think there is something unhealthily satisfying about the emotional roller coaster of:

1) oh shit... I have to work again. I can't imagine a worse fate.
2) Well, it isn't bad with added time saver costs. I missed interacting professionally & all this $$
3) Hum-drum salary mans life, dislike day-to-day, minor existential crisis and minor depression
4) I'm free again, YOLO!
5) Perfect mix of nonpaid activities.
repeat

Frita
Posts: 632
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:43 pm

Re: Mini-retirements vs ERE?

Post by Frita »

classical_Liberal wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 3:00 pm
There may even be further cost savings, not increased spending, if you find the right mix of work/off time for your personal flow. Because I think a job can provide situations in which you're getting paid to satisfy some desire/need that you'd otherwise spend to obtain.
Work can provide meaning, engaging social interaction, and a means to make friends. Leaving work behind is easier if it doesn’t provide these things from my experience. Actually, if these three conditions aren’t met, I won’t work there.

As for more tangible items, what do you see as benefits? Here is my list based on past perks: 403(b)/501(k), insurance, travel for conferences, drinks/meals, exercise classes, discounts.
classical_Liberal wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 3:00 pm

This is harder than it seems. Rather, it's time and energy consuming. To find the right work, in the right amounts, at the right times to fit into your life. Just because I haven't yet found the right mix, doesn't mean I won't. Although it's easy to fall into the trap of just shutting up...
Agreed! And I don’t know that being FI makes the quest any easier, just different. I want to believe that there is a workable solution and suspect that it involves periodically switching things up. There is a certain appeal of doing what everyone else does and/or numbing to the point of not caring. No, thanks. Then I sometimes wonder if I am going through some misery phase and use work as an excuse. Gasp, that is damn scary.
classical_Liberal wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 3:00 pm

I also think there is something unhealthily satisfying about the emotional roller coaster...
Also, damn scary, based on my past four years:
1. Look for job in tough market.
2. Select the best option available.
3. Keep an open mind.
4. Discover it’s not a good fit.
5. Experience relief after quitting.
6. Get restless.
7. Repeat.
I honestly do not enjoy this emotional rollercoaster, yet I repeat it. What I do tell myself is that I am learning, refining my approach each time, and not repeating mistakes.

classical_Liberal
Posts: 2149
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 6:05 am

Re: Mini-retirements vs ERE?

Post by classical_Liberal »

Frita wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 4:14 pm
As for more tangible items, what do you see as benefits? Here is my list based on past perks: 403(b)/501(k), insurance, travel for conferences, drinks/meals, exercise classes, discounts.
Then there are more intangible benefits. Like, certain jobs can really get your blood pumping and adrenaline going. Why pay for a roller coaster when you can work a code blue? Or why pay to go out for drinks at the bar when you can have super meaningful discussions with coworkers or patients in your down time. Things like this that are more nuanced and probably dependant on personal desires.

Edited to Add: Anyway, my point is that if you balance work so that you can get "enough" of something that you desire. Then you don't need to pay for it. But not "too much" that you end up paying to get out of doing other things, then it can really end up a positive sum situation. This is my goal.
Frita wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 4:14 pm
I honestly do not enjoy this emotional rollercoaster, yet I repeat it. What I do tell myself is that I am learning, refining my approach each time, and not repeating mistakes.
Yeah. I'm not sure I like it either. Rather I think there is an addictive quality to it. Some weird sense of relief at the end of or change of each cycle. There are certainly less healthy things to do, and certainly some benefit to forcing yourself out of a comfort zone regularly too.

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