Page 4 of 6

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 8:48 pm
by Seneca
Before you get too attached, the boots are very expensive, think $500. You could buy several pairs of docs.

My last serious boots were Vasque Sundowners, which though great boots, pale in comparison. I'm sure they'll last twice as long (making them cost the same).

We hiked the Inca Trail in 2011, and while none of our fellow tourists took notice, many guides were very interested in my boots and asked me about them. Forestry fire people, in the western US at least, are big customers too.

Danner also makes a great US made boot, and they sometimes run killer sales.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 9:01 pm
by jennypenny
Seneca wrote:Before you get too attached, the boots are very expensive, think $500. You could buy several pairs of docs.
That doesn't surprise me. Living where you do, I'm sure you can guess how much my good cowboy boots were.

Since all of my current shoes are at least 10 years old (the docs are much older), I won't feel bad about spending good money for a new pair. And at my age, everything probably counts as BIFL. :lol:

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 6:28 pm
by jacob

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 9:13 pm
by Freedom_2018
Ah..so much Shoe Porn....

My $89 on sale Harley After Ride boots are still doing great after 3 years of near daily use...used them for work, social stuff, motorcycle trips and small hikes when on such trips. I think with similar use they could last another 6 years.

I am so tempted to buy a real hiking boot but I'm going to wait and actually let the need come up (i.e. start going on some real backpack type hikes) before buying one. I have looked for a boot that would do double duty as a hiker and a motorcycle boot. Haven't found any yet. It is amazing to me that there is no offering for this segment.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 12:03 pm
by Seneca
Freedom_2018 wrote:I am so tempted to buy a real hiking boot but I'm going to wait and actually let the need come up (i.e. start going on some real backpack type hikes) before buying one. I have looked for a boot that would do double duty as a hiker and a motorcycle boot. Haven't found any yet. It is amazing to me that there is no offering for this segment.
What would you consider features you want to see in a motorcycle boot that are not present in some hiking boots?

Personally, I like lots of padding, armor and ankle protection when riding, to the point it must ruin mobility and comfort for hiking, but short of that I think any good, all leather, 8" boot would make a fine riding boot, with more protection than most ride with.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:20 pm
by george
Just have to share.

When an exclusive girls school banned teachers from wearing sport shoes I was really caught.

I ended up in the mens slipper department and on a whim I bought black plain mens slippers (worn with trousers)

Noone ever noticed.

I have deformed feet, and it was so comfortable and cost so little.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 8:41 am
by JohnnyH
@Jacob: Yes, those are them; the Alico Guides... Sierra Trading Post has good coupon deals if you signup. I paid $175 w/ free shipping. Recently a coupon got them to $185 w/ free shipping... Also you can order many sizes and return the ones that don't fit for something like $6 using STP's return label.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:11 am
by Papers of Indenture
I just picked up a pair of Whites Smokejumpers used. $137. Only worn 3 or 4 times according to seller and they look it. I've never had a boot like this. Built like a brick shit house. Cost $430 new.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:17 am
by jennypenny
Papers of Indenture wrote:I just picked up a pair of Whites Smokejumpers used. $137. Only worn 3 or 4 times according to seller and they look it. I've never had a boot like this. Built like a brick shit house. Cost $430 new.
How did you find them used?

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:56 am
by sshawnn
Papers of Indenture wrote:I just picked up a pair of Whites Smokejumpers used. $137. Only worn 3 or 4 times according to seller and they look it. I've never had a boot like this. Built like a brick shit house. Cost $430 new.

I like the idea of the Whites boots. They do seem durable. I am skeptical of Whites proprietary Arch Ease.

http://www.whitesboots.com/index.php?di ... ory_id=444

Let us know how the Smokejumpers wear and feel for long periods.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 12:54 pm
by Papers of Indenture
jennypenny wrote:
Papers of Indenture wrote:I just picked up a pair of Whites Smokejumpers used. $137. Only worn 3 or 4 times according to seller and they look it. I've never had a boot like this. Built like a brick shit house. Cost $430 new.
How did you find them used?
eBay.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 1:07 pm
by C40
I'm going through Red Wing, MN soon for work. I'm planning to go to their store - they have a basement level with factory 2nds (mostly small blemishes I've read). I'll see what kind of deal I can get. Back before my job change and move southward, I bought a huge pair of boots that were good for walking in the winter. But I'd never wear them now for work (traveling/flying, or at office and don't need steel toe).... So I'm going to look for steel toe oxfords there.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 1:10 pm
by jennypenny
@C40-Are you taking orders? ;)

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 1:21 pm
by C40
Actually, yes I could. I've read the shoes downstairs are buy 2 pairs get 1 free, so if it works out to get you and/or others a pair, we'd get a further discount.

Those interested - PM me the style and size you want.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:49 am
by JohnnyH
I am familiar with White's, the pride of the wildland firefighter elitist... While I have not owned a pair of White's, I've owned similar pricepoint logging boots, and I cannot see them lasting anywhere near as long as welt boots... I've seen dozens of pairs of White's fail in stitching that doesn't exist on welt boots.

Logger boots are lighter, much more easily broken in and perhaps more comfortable than welt boots. But welt boots keep you drier (fewer stitching seams to seal), are less prone to rolling ankles (I've rolled in loggers, but not welt). Lastly, logging heals drive me crazy (prone to rolling, like a high-heal) and loggers left my feet feeling like burger after a days on the screes.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 12:47 pm
by Seneca
JohnnyH wrote:I am familiar with White's, the pride of the wildland firefighter elitist... While I have not owned a pair of White's, I've owned similar pricepoint logging boots, and I cannot see them lasting anywhere near as long as welt boots... I've seen dozens of pairs of White's fail in stitching that doesn't exist on welt boots.

Logger boots are lighter, much more easily broken in and perhaps more comfortable than welt boots. But welt boots keep you drier (fewer stitching seams to seal), are less prone to rolling ankles (I've rolled in loggers, but not welt). Lastly, logging heals drive me crazy (prone to rolling, like a high-heal) and loggers left my feet feeling like burger after a days on the screes.
You can get White's with Vibram lugged and heeled soles, what you're calling "logger", or with other more traditional hiking/flat Vibram soles.

I now have several hundred miles on a pair of White's 8" with lugged sole/Arch-Ease "Outdoorsmen". I have come to the conclusion I like the heel. It feels weird to put them on at first, but I love how the heel catches when you start to slip on rough terrain, especially when wearing a load. I can see how people might not like this, each of our feet, gait etc are different. Boots that work for one might not for another.

I bought them for hiking and backpacking, and have hiked them in extremely wet and slippery conditions, all last winter in mud and snow, and in the desert, including lots of off-piste. In the past I've had the old Vasque Sundowners, mountaineering Asolos etc as my backpacking boots. So far the White's appear to be far more durable, are more comfortable the harder the day/trip and equally weather resistant. My biggest complaints in my use would be they are heavier than any boots I've owned, and they are more money. They also were slow to break in.

They are not the most comfortable boot on hard surfaces, and they are heavy, there are definitely better boots than anything with heavy lugged Vibram soles if you want a mixed use boot for concrete jungles.

For me they do exactly what I want them to better than anything I've tried, but I was looking for a specialist shoe.

Based on my observation of how the leather/stitching and general construction has held up, and how they fit my feet if I was trying to get a single do it all pair of boots, White's be high on my list, but I would not get the heeled/lugged ones for it. My favorite do-it-all shoes I own with city use would be a pair of Danners I got at one of their big sales.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Mon Apr 11, 2016 10:30 am
by George the original one
Necrothread...

I've been buying Merrell slip-ons for about 14 years. Way back then, I was mourning the lack of Velcro shoes because I hate tying shoes (the more arthritic & inflexible you become as you age, the more you don't want to tie shoes). Decent style, but they don't last more than 2-3 years and I would wear them as casual office shoes until appearance sagged and then move them to gardening/hiking shoes. Either the sole wears through or the sole's seam will fail.

Last year I was introduced to Georgia Boot Company's Romeos (slip-on low top boots) when I saw someone wearing them while wading/fishing. Looked into them, but decided they were too boot-like for office wear and not really suitable for summer wading/fishing shoes. However, now that I'm retired, no longer going to an office, and my current pair of Merrells failed, it suddenly made sense to try them. Same price as the Merrells, so little to lose and potentially a lot to gain, but it will be a few years before I know whether they outlast the Merrells.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Mon Apr 11, 2016 11:00 am
by enigmaT120
Once I get a pair of running shoes adjusted to be as tight as I can without them hurting the top of my foot, I never untie them. They're just like slippers for me. After their running life span they retire to be work shoes.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 4:23 pm
by polaran
What do all of you use for running shoes? I wear trail runners for everyday school/work wear, plus running about 30 miles per week on rocky trails and backpacking. I currently use Altra lone peaks and love them, particularly since I have a relatively wide forefoot and narrow heels. I switched from boots to trail runners for backpacking about two years ago and don't think I'll ever go back due to the lighter weight, faster drying time, and greater comfort. The biggest downside is cost - last year I wore out 5 pairs of Altras in 2,600 miles of backpacking, plus one additional pair that I wore the other 8 months of the year. Even purchasing the previous year's model on sale it was one of my largest expenses while thru hiking. I won't be doing that kind of mileage again in the near future, but would love to find something that I can run/hike in that doesn't have to be replaced so frequently.

Re: Durable shoes

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 8:26 pm
by Toska2
Asics Gel Kahana 7 : long lasting heel and sole, wider in the arch way, estimated milelage mostly walking : 1500

Mizuno wave rider : lighter than above asics, curved too early and my little toe rubbed thru the upper, emmw :800

Keen Targhee ii mid : very comfortable, higher heel makes for great walking/hiking but fair jogging. It seems the sole heel block starts 1/4" - 1/2" too soon on the inside. If this is for motion control, it works too well as the rear heel blocks suffer. Mine wore smooth in 100 miles unloaded walking on asphalt. If I seem harsh here it's because I was breaking them in and they show more wear than my three year old Asics. I'm torn buying Keens if the sole is that soft or badly designed.

I alternated until failure. The Altra's look promising.