Mens Fashion

Simple living, extreme early retirement, being wealthy, ...
Redbird
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Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2019 1:29 pm

Re: Mens Fashion

Post by Redbird »

Since ERE can be approached or thought of as living like a poor aristocrat, perhaps that's a style that could be adopted. :D

I believe general principles are to buy the best quality you can afford and wear the hell out of it. Sounds familiar! What those individual pieces ought to be gets a little trickier because of regional distinctions and traditions like Old Money New England vs British aristocrat vs French aristocrat etc. You could even adopt from a region different from your own to avoid the appearance of social climbing.

Do any of you follow the blog "The Old Money Book"? It's an interesting peek into that world and, to me, many of the values espoused, at least the financial ones, align with ERE/FIRE. The blogger is authoring a book on old money style. Could be a useful resource or could be heavily New England prep centric:

https://theoldmoneybook.com/2019/11/11/ ... ney-style/

jacob
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by jacob »

@Redbird - My use of "poor aristocrat" on the blog and in the book likely traces back to reading books about "English gentleman"-style, values and spending my monies on "timeless luxury" (this is definitely where my interest in fine watches originated), just prior to discovering anti-consumerism. In terms of clothing, I think I researched pretty much every single Barbour jacket back in the early noughts even though I never bought one. That's as far as I went though. I never managed to develop a strong interest in clothing or create anything coherent. However, if I did, this would be the way I'd likely go. I think Rob Wringham nailed this one.

I've never heard of the old money book or blog. Have you read the book?

Ralphy
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by Ralphy »

I read and enjoyed the Old Money book in the past year. The blog was a more recent discovery.

Some of the core values in Tully's Old Money philosophy are Health, Education, Work Ethic, Financial Independence (among others)...plenty of overlap with ERE.

Some quotes from the intro:
- "Ironically, to enjoy and benefit from the values and way of life of Old Money does not require money, but will often result in the accumulation of it."
- "...Old Money is more concerned with the way things actually are with their personal situation than the way they appear to others." [personal reality > public perception]

Sound familiar?

It's influenced my own framework, but I suppose I've had a soft spot for that "English gentleman"-style for a while now. The Kindle book was only $2.99. I'll buy the Style book if it's similarly priced.

7Wannabe5
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

Eh, if you truly were from Old Money, you wouldn't be going out shopping for quality. You'd just be happening upon it when you dug through a closet at your Great-Uncle's house looking for a tennis racket. You also wouldn't be fretting about whether or not you look like Old Money at a job interview.

Also, as noted above, in the U.S. "Old Money Style" is synonymous with New England WASP style. Since my direct paternal line landed within walking distance of Thoreau's Pond on the second voyage of the Mayflower, I grew up with constant advice from my father on this theme*:
.Old Money is more concerned with the way things actually are with their personal situation than the way they appear to others." [personal reality > public perception]
Unfortunately, he also often offered up my bipolar-spendaholic, third-generation, upward-mobility-oriented mother's behavior as counter-example.

After retirement, he grew a beard and was in the habit of taking long walk through the city streets in the morning while drinking a cup of coffee (in a take-away cup he used over and over again) dressed in old rumpled business clothes rather than new shiny leisure wear. One day he was stopped and questioned by police officers who were searching for a homeless man who had thrown a rock through a window. So, my mother, eyes shining with relishment of long-sought victory, exclaimed "See, I told you appearances do matter!"

My mate (my new term for those I previously designated as "polyamours") who was old money enough to be designated the American boy companion for Sir Edmund Hillary's son, dresses almost exactly like my father did. As in, "Where can you even find a threadbare, oddly stained trench coat in that depressing shade of beige anymore?" OTOH, if you had to guess what sport they both played in their youth, tennis would likely, correctly, come to mind.



*Even though his family never really achieved more than upper-middle-class money.

Redbird
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by Redbird »

I read the book a couple years ago and enjoyed the perspective of someone from that socio-economic class. As Ralphy mentioned it covers several topics and there's plenty of overlap. It's a short read but very direct and just about every paragraph is a line of advice.

Redbird
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by Redbird »

Jacob,

Is there somewhere that Rob Wringham details his approach to a wardrobe? I couldn't find anything in my search.

Speaking of Barbour, I ran across a maker of Barbour-like jackets from England that seem comparable at a fraction of the eye-watering cost of the real thing. I'd be tempted to get one if I didn't already have a serviceable nylon rain jacket. For anyone interested:

https://walkerandhawkes.co.uk/product-c ... ts/page/2/

jacob
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by jacob »

He owns 20-30 things total and just wears a dark two-piece suit at all times, so it's hardly a wardrobe. It is a very consistent style though.

Hristo Botev
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by Hristo Botev »

I'm a little late to this topic and haven't read through all the posts, but men's fashion (as it applies to me, specifically) is one of the few things I've actually finalized a definitive opinion on. I'm an attorney and though I could wear jeans or something similarly casual almost every day to work, doing so would require me having to remember which days I have a client meetings or court hearings or whatever, that requires me wearing something a bit more formal. So a while ago I decided I'd go with a uniform of sorts, consisting of slacks and a blazer, or a suit, with a tie and dress shoes, which is what I wear every work day except sometimes Fridays. When I'm not at work and also not just doing work around the house or running errands, I wear jeans and a blazer. Ultimately, my wardrobe goals are: (1) simplicity, I want to think about clothes and what I'm going to wear as little as possible; and (2) respect, as in I want to show the appropriate amount of respect for wherever I am or whoever I'm with--work, clients, church, friends/family, etc.

My slacks (x3, all shades of grey, in various weights), blazer (navy blue), suits (x2, shades grey), dress shirts (x4, variations of white/blue), and ties (4) are all from Sid Mashburn, because I like his stuff, he's a southerner, his sizing is consistent, tailoring and repairs for life are included in the price, he designs dress clothes for a southern climate, which is to say it's the kind of wool you can wear at an outdoor wedding in the South in August, and it's the best quality for money I've been able to find for new clothes. Apart from replacement dress shirts, I haven't bought anything from Sid in at least 5 years, because his clothes are high quality and get better with age. My first suit from Sid I bought 10 years ago, and when the seat of the pants started to get threadbare a couple years ago, I had a seamstress reinforce them with extra stitching and patches, and they are still in my regular rotation and likely will be for many years to come. And because my clothes from Sid are tailored (and expensive, relative to low quality alternatives like Jos.A.Bank or whatever), I know I can't let my weight and waistline get out of control to the point that the clothes don't fit anymore.

Apart from new clothes from Sid, my work wardrobe consists of:
- 2 pairs of captoe dress shoes, black Aldens (bought new) and brown Cole Haan (thrift store);
- 2 thin sweaters, both from a thrift store, to which I added elbow patches because I wear them to work under my blazer/suit jacket during the winter and wear out the elbows;
- A few additional ties, from who knows where; and
- white pocket squares, naturally.

For non-work clothes, apart from around-the-house stuff, my wardrobe is:
- 3 pairs of Levi's shrink-to-fit 501s, at varying levels of wear (the oldest pair are fully faded now and the crotch has had to be repaired twice; the newest pair, about 2 years old, is still dressy enough to wear to work or church);
- 1 heavy sweater, from LL Bean;
- Some casual button-down long-sleeve shirts and polos;
- 1 pair of brown, Billy Reid (another southerner) boots, from a thrift store;
- 1 pair of brown leather camp moccasins, from Sid;
- 1 pair of brown leather penny loafers, from Sid;
- 1 blue linen blazer, from LL Bean but tailored to fit at Sid Mashburn; and
- 1 heavy herringbone tweed blazer, for winter, from a thrift store.

Hristo Botev
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Re: Mens Fashion

Post by Hristo Botev »

I'll add that one benefit of a work wardrobe that consists almost entirely of wool clothes, coupled with wearing Levi's STF jeans (which you don't really have to wash very often, and you never tumble dry them), is that the only thing I have to wash on a weekly basis, apart from underwear and socks, are my dress shirts, and I typically wear a dress shirt at least twice before washing. I do the laundry at our house, and in an effort to try and get my kids to not throw every article of clothing in the hamper after only a couple hours of wear, I make sure my kids see each week how much taller their stacks of folded laundry are than mine. They just shrug their shoulders of course; can't wait until they are old enough to start doing their own laundry.

Redbird
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Joined: Wed Sep 25, 2019 1:29 pm

Re: Mens Fashion

Post by Redbird »

An interview with Byron Tully, author of the Old Money Book and Old Money Style:
http://www.ivy-style.com/old-is-new-aga ... tully.html
IS: Your books are almost a vaccine against consumer culture. After reading them, one is cured of any desire to follow the latest fashions or spend too much money.

BT: Good! You’re paying attention.
And
But this is about more than clothing. You can’t be worldly if you’re not well-read. You have to educate yourself, consistently, over a lifetime, inside the classroom and outside of it. And you can’t be control of much of anything if you’ve spent all your money on your wardrobe. A financially independent man in khakis and a button-down is much more stylish than a fashion plate who has to go to a job he hates every day.

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