Share your recipes

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halfmoon
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by halfmoon » Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:41 pm

EdithKeeler wrote:
Wed Aug 23, 2017 8:08 pm
I was craving one of my favorite super budget meals tonight, so thought I'd post the recipe as I sit here with a happily full belly. It's sort of a not real measure-y recipe--I don't measure much. Sorry. But it's very forgiving.

"Unstuffed Cabbage Casserole" ----basically deconstructed stuffed cabbage that's MUCH less work.
Now, this is my idea of FOOD. I would probably use more cabbage because I'm addicted to the stuff and it seems to disappear when you cook it. :cry:

What I need at the moment is something appetizing to do with zucchini that are taking over the universe. I make sandwiches out of the slices, grate them for salads, fry them and top with parmesan, dry them as chips...I'm losing the war. Zucchini bread isn't an option because it doesn't use enough (and I'll be the only one eating it and looking like a pumpkin).

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:55 am

Cut them in half the long way.
Extract the white pulp with a spoon, so that you are left with two half pieces of a tube.
Cut and sautée the white pulp in a pan with garlic, a bit of sausage to add flavor.
When cooked turn off the heat, add an egg and some Parmesan.
The remaining heat will partially cook the egg.
Use this stuffing and put it back in the zucchini shell.
Sprinkle with Parmesan and cook in the oven for 10 mins.
Delicious also cold.

EdithKeeler
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by EdithKeeler » Fri Aug 25, 2017 4:56 pm

Now, this is my idea of FOOD. I would probably use more cabbage because I'm addicted to the stuff and it seems to disappear when you cook it. :cry:

What I need at the moment is something appetizing to do with zucchini that are taking over the universe. I make sandwiches out of the slices, grate them for salads, fry them and top with parmesan, dry them as chips...I'm losing the war. Zucchini bread isn't an option because it doesn't use enough (and I'll be the only one eating it and looking like a pumpkin).
Yeah, I love cabbage too. Yumny and good for you. And cheap!

I love aglio olio with zucchini--in GOOD olive oil sauté garlic and sliced zucchini; toss with spaghetti and parm if you like.

There's always "zoodles," zucchini sliced into ribbons, lightly cooked and tossed with a favorite sauce.

Stuffed zucchini boats stuffed with sausage bread and cheese--lots of different recipes on the web.

I saw "weenie in a zucchini" on the Mid Century Menu site. They liked it!
http://www.midcenturymenu.com/2017/08/z ... cipe-test/

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:13 am

Last weekend I made leeks and potato soup.
It could sound simple and/or weird but it's delicious.

For about 10 smallish servings you need

4 medium sized potatoes
3 leeks
2 carrots
A minuscule bit of pancetta/bacon/whatever
2 garlic cloves
Some Parmesan crust
Aromatic salt

Potatoes and leeks size for your reference:

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Chop the garlic and the pancetta

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Make a "soffritto", letting them simmer at mid-low heat in some olive oil or other fat for a good 15-20 minutes

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In the meantime, chop all the veggies

Start by putting the leeks only, add a glass of water and close, so that the leeks start to soften up

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Make yourself a margarita (this step not mandatory)

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This is how the leeks look when you can add the remaining veggies

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Now add water, the aromatic salt (you can make yours as described in prior post) and the Parmesan crust.

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Don't overlook the Parmesan crust, and NEVER throw it away when you buy Parmesan.
It's possibly the single best flavor enhancer for soups, it adds depth without being too prominent.
It becomes super soft with the cooking.

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Let cook for a couple hours at least, adding water as needed.

When it looks like this

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Just mix it.

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It's fantastic on its own, you can cook small pasta or rice in it (just add water and some more salt), and it works in hot/cold combinations that can surprise your guests or your SO (try it with a fresh goat ricotta or similar).

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:47 pm

Today I felt like pretending we're ballers and wanted to have a dinner that tasted like the 0.01%

So I prepared pasta with zucchini and shrimp

You will need:
- a good quality pasta (De Cecco ideal)
- zucchini
- wild shrimp (if you ever thought about eating farm raised shrimp, do some googling. You're welcome)
- garlic
- olive oil

Start as usual by preparing a garlic soffritto.

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Let the garlic go at mid heat for approx 15 minutes.
It's ready when it starts turning just a bit brownish

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Throw the garlic away and keep the flavored oil.
Cut the zucchini thin.
About this thin:

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Put in the pan at mid heat. Don't put too much zucchini in the pan or it will boil. This is the max you can fit into a pan

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Now let cook for a good 15-20 minutes, but you have to monitor the zucchini to avoid any burning.
Don't move them too much, you just have to pay attention they don't burn.
The best use of your time is to make a good Italian aperitivo for you and your SO (this step not mandatory but strongly encouraged).
Pictured here: salame, 30months reggiano, bread and Campari with white wine
Edit: now that I look at this pic, I'm still amazed how my 8 years old zwilling knife still has the sticker on it.
Good knives don't go into the dishwasher, but still. Even the stickers are durable on German stuff (I use it daily)

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When the zucchini are ready, add salt to your liking and set aside.
This is a good cooking status:

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Boil some water

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And prepare the shrimps
This is the size I like

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Boil them exactly for 2 minutes.
I know it feels short. Just do two minutes, trust me.
Drain and set aside to cool down

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Put the pasta water to boil (I used the same pot I used for the shrimp).
Remember: minimum 1 gallon of water every pound of pasta.

This is the amount of salt I put in 3 quarts

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When the water is boiling you can throw the pasta and start cleaning the shrimp.
If you're not and experienced cook I would suggest you clean the shrimp first and start cooking the pasta later.

To clean the shrimp, cut right before the start of the tail

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Then start peeling with your thumb like so:

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End result:

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Chop the shrimp up like so

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Take the now cold zucchini out of the pan

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Drain the pasta 1 minute before your perfect al dente cooking

And toss it into the now empty pan

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Add the zucchini, the shrimp and some oil and sautée for a minute

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Put in plate and garnish with a bit of black pepper and (if you like it), some spicy oil

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Buon appetito!

baska
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by baska » Fri Oct 13, 2017 5:55 pm

but why throw away garlic :-( Its not good after 15 minute cooking in olive?

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Sat Oct 14, 2017 2:36 am

You can keep it if you like :)
The idea for throwing it away is that all the flavors in this recipe are subtle and delicate.
Zucchini and shrimp aren't very overpowering, and this recipe works on a delicate balance.
Garlic is much stronger, so I like it to give the flavor to the oil, but I personally wouldn't want to accidentally chew on a piece or it would cover the taste of that mouthful and the following 3 or 4.
But again taste is personal, so feel free!
In case I had to let it in I would probably
1- use less garlic than shown in the picture
2- chop it super finely so no chunks will be present at the end

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Sat Oct 28, 2017 11:18 am

An easy one today
I'm from northern Italy, so I love polenta.
The real thing is made on actual wood fire in a big copper pot, and it's delicious.
Please take a look at the complete awesomeness of this

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Still, a good instant polenta will be 75% as good while demanding approximately 5% of the effort.

FYI this is probably the best instant polenta you can buy:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000V1ECO8/

I don't know if the cooking instructions specify it, but ALWAYS add some butter at the end, prior to serving it, as it will not only improve the taste, but also greatly help re-using any leftovers.

The main uses for polenta just made are:

- as a side with stews, mix it with the sauce.
- with soft cheeses: prepare some chopped cheese and pour the lava-hot polenta up top, then mix.
- with sautéed mushrooms.
- with fried eggs
- with melted butter, garlic and sage. Just melt some butter and fry some garlic and sage in it. Add a lot of this mix to polenta.

What to do with leftover polenta:
Cut some stripes about 1/3rd of an inch thick. (In case you want to keep the polenta longer, you can also freeze these strips and do the following steps with frozen ones)

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Heat up some butter and fry some garlic in it

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Put the strips in and leave on mid-low heat for about 10-15 minutes per side

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This is when it's ready

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Take the polenta out and fry an egg, add salt and pepper.

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Fish
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Fish » Sat Oct 28, 2017 3:10 pm

Seppia wrote:
Tue Oct 11, 2016 7:33 am
2- bring to boil and put a lot of salt in the water. My way of explaining this to non Italians is: put as much salt as you think is sane, then double it.
You want to put salt in the pasta, not in the sauce, it makes for a more homogenous taste.
Thanks for the tip Seppia! I’ve used it several times now and it definitely improves taste. The “double” rule is a little counter-intuitive, but I reason that the concentration of salt in pasta cannot exceed that of the surrounding water. So much of the salt is wasted (it remains in the cooking water) but is necessary to get the pasta to the desired saltiness.

jennypenny
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by jennypenny » Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:08 pm

@Seppia -- Have you ever tried grits? We like them with shrimp or poached eggs and a little hot sauce. It's made basically the same as the first step in polenta only I use cheddar cheese instead of parmesan. Since you already have the ingredients you might want to try it.

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:10 am

I love grits, I would eat them every day when I went to Texas, I had an agent in the Dallas area that used to bring me to a place where they made spectacular ones.
I slightly prefer polenta as it's usually a bit less liquid.
But man, shrimp and grits, it was love at first taste.
I always had ideological fights with my fellow Italians who did not recognize that there's phenomenal food in the USA.

I made a simplified risotto recipe yesterday night, I think this one will be very actionable, will post it later today

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:20 am

Ok so as promised here a simple and fast way to prepare risotto.
This is 99% as good as the real thing with 20% of the effort.

First things first: the rice.
You need a round rice, the best ones are, in no particular order:

Carnaroli
Arborio
Vialone Nano
Superfino Roma

The first two are the most commonly available abroad.
Any attempt to make a risotto using long grain, Thai, jasmine or other unfit rices will result in failure and possibly the zombie apocalypse.
Stick to the four above.
In case you wondered, my favorite is superfino Roma:

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The key with this fast process is the water to rice ratio: three cups of water (or broth) for one cup of rice.

The basic is:
- Boil the water (or broth)
- Add salt to your liking (hint: rice is sweet, so add more than you think is right as you will have a tendency to undersalt)
- Put the rice in
- Close the lid
- Stir occasionally
- Let cook for 12 minutes on low-mid heat (you need to see some simmering)
- Open lid and taste the rice
- if needed add a bit of water and continue to cook till almost ready, then take it off the flame. The rice has to be a bit more liquid and a bit more "al dente" than you want it
- add a bit of butter, stir, and let rest for 2 minutes with lid on (rice will finish cooking and suck up some moisture.

You can incorporate extra ingredients along the way.
Basically:
Everything that needs to be fully cooked and is ok with boiling -> incorporate right from the start or midway through
Everything that has to be sautéed -> cook separately and incorporate at the end.

The recipe below is with Parmesan and green peas.

Boil the water with lid on to avoid loss of liquid by evaporation

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Add half a cube broth and the rice

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About 4-5 minutes in, add some finely cut Parmesan crust, and the green peas

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Close again the lid, and grate some Parmesan while the rice finishes cooking

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This is how liquid it has to look when you take it off the flame:

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Add a bit of butter and 3/4 of the grated Parmesan

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Stir, close the lid and let rest for 2 minutes, then put in the plate and sprinkle with the remaining Parmesan.

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:28 am

@Fish: happy it worked out well for you, I'm pumped when people find recommendations useful, it's a great feeling, so thanks for the kind message :)

J_
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by J_ » Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:47 am

Sepia thanks for your delicious recipies. I have one of the more northen part of europe: green cabbage stew with
carrot/squash-frites
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1 peel a butternut squash and clean 3 wintercarrots
cut them like (potato)frites, lay them on baking paper on a baking tray
sprinkle them with some oil and bake them for 35 mins on 175 C

2 peel and cut in small pieces two sweet (purple skin) potatoes and boil them in little water
for 10 minutes ad last 5 minutes half of a green cabbage (cut in small pieces)( or a half bundle of kale)

3 fry 3 onions, some ginger and garlic in a skillet until soft, and mix them with the sweet potatoes and green cabbage or kale

Serve with some pieces of goat cheese and coriander leaves.

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distracted_at_work
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by distracted_at_work » Wed Nov 01, 2017 12:02 pm

Recent creation of mine to celebrate the cold weather..

Lentil + Bratwurst Soup

3 Cups of Lentils
2 Zucchini
1 Celery
1 BIG Yam
2 28 oz Cans of Tomatoes
2 Large Onions
2 Large Carrots
1 Can of Black Beans
2 L of Chicken Broth (Can use Vegetable or Beef)
1 Can of Mushrooms (Sliced)
2 Bratwurst (or other large sausage)
2 TBSP of Canola Oil.
4 TBSP of Chili Flakes
2 TBSP of Celery Salt.
2 TBSP of Garlic Powder
X Salt and Pepper to taste.
2-4 Cups of Water.

Instructions:
In one pan add and heat the oil. Crumble the bratwurst and dice the onions. Brown the sausage in pan and cook down the onions. In the meantime, dice all other fresh vegetables. In one very large pot. Add ALL the above ingredients at the same time. Bring to a rolling boil then cover and let simmer. I simmered it for 1.5 hrs to ensure the lentils and all the vegetables cooked. Serve with cilantro and a habanero based hot sauce.

This is a great one as we move into Winter. This recipe has fed me dinner for nearly two weeks and I had to freeze some. Very hearty and economical. You can cut back on the chili flakes if you don't like spice. I had to estimate the seasoning as I never measure these things out.

It should look like this in the pot (before cooking)

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CS
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by CS » Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:37 pm

I can't share them directly (because they aren't mine), but I've found recipes by this author to be wonderful. https://healinghistamine.com Most are plant based (i.e. can be cheap), but also healing, which is helpful. She has a mailing list and sends out free recipes once in a while. Her recipe books are not that expensive.

I've no connection to her, except her green soup, with my addition of poached pastured eggs in it (ala GAPS regime), is a staple of my diet - at least several nights a week. I feel better physically when I eat it.

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Sun Nov 05, 2017 12:01 pm

You may remember that in the marmalade recipe I started a "side quest", basically liquor production.
This process I'm about to describe works for a variety of types of liquor.

Today I'll show how to do ginger liquor, a fantastic digesting aid.

First you need to buy pure drinking alcohol.
Usually what's for sale is a grain based, 190+ proof spirit.

Buy some fresh ginger, about 11oz will do for a bottle (300g)

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Clean the ginger

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Then chop it up in little pieces

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Remove some alcohol from the bottle, to account for displacement

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Dump the ginger in the bottle

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Store in a cool and dark place for around 20 days.
If you store it for longer, the liquor will not become more flavorful, but it will become more spicy. This may not be a bad thing for you (it isn't for me).

After time has passed, you have to dilute the beast.
This is done with syrup (water + sugar).
You basically let boil some water with sugar in it for a few minutes (3-4 is enough) and you're done.

I'm not a sweet person, so my personal sweet spot is 3 parts of sugar for 10 parts of water, by weight.
The traditional Italian recipe calls for 3 parts of sugar and 4 parts of water.

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Once the syrup is cool, you can mix it with the alcohol.
Again here strength is a matter of taste, but I would not go below 55-60 proof nor above 100 proof.

Worth noting: alcohol content and sugar content have both direct correlation with the stability of the syrup-alcohol mix.

So if you both go low on sugar and low on alcohol the resulting liquor could have a tendency to separate.
There is no negative effect other than the fact it might be visually unappealing.

My favorite doses are
Syrup:
10-3 water-sugar by weight
Liquor:
90 proof

Other than ginger, you can do the same exact process with many ingredients.
Just dump those in pure alcohol for a while and then mix with water/sugar syrup.

Some ideas:

- lemon peel for limoncello.
Use untreated lemons, and try use only the yellow part of the lemon skin (white is bitter).
You need the peel of 7-10 lemons for each liter (quart) of pure alcohol.
I suggest 40 days in cool dark place.

- bay leaves.
About 20 bay leaves per liter of alcohol.
Also 40 days

- any type of berries
They have to fill about 1/4 of the bottle, fill the rest with pure alcohol.
40 days


Here is the result of today's bottling.
Left two bottles is limoncello, right is ginger.

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Sun Nov 05, 2017 12:43 pm

Side note.
Tools are very important in the kitchen, and knives are the most important of all.
Pots and pans are second, all else is a lot less relevant.

The bad news is that good knives are expensive.
The good news is, when you buy good knives, you don't need many.
I have a grand total of two:

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The top one is the only knife you'll ever need for cooking.
I had this one for 7 years, I use it every single day and it's still like new.
I had a similar one that I lost while moving to the USA, that I had bought in 1999.
It was 10 years old and still going strong.

Mine is this model:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00004RFLH/

My personal feeling is that anything less than this quality is suboptimal, anything above you are mostly paying for style.
That type is called "chef's knife".
It's usually available in 8" and 6".
I personally prefer 6" because I find it more versatile and easier to use in everyday situations.

The attributes you want to look for in a chef's knife:

- welded stainless steel blade. Stamped blade = shit.
- full tang blade.
- German or Japanese steel. Value for money the Germans are better. Careful: lower level quality German knives are made with non-German steel.
- synthetic handle. Wood is nice and classy, but there's a reason why in restaurant kitchens you only see synthetic. It doesn't grow mold, it's more resistant, has better grip.

The bottom one is just a luxury I allowed myself lately, I'm a bit ashamed.
It's a hand made Japanese knife, the best paring knife I've ever used by a mile.
I was cooking at a friend's place and he casually handed one to me to peel some garlic.
I fell in love instantly.
When I told him he smiled and said something like "yeah, it's the best paring knife I've tried in my career" (the guy is in his 60s and he used to own a Michelin starred restaurant in midtown Manhattan)

Moki long hunter is the name.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B005DL5U4M/

Hope this helps.

jennypenny
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by jennypenny » Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:46 pm

We joke about lentils all the time but maybe some of you don't know how to cook them. I had some carrots that were getting funky in the fridge in addition to some leftover spinach, so I made a basic lentil soup last night. It has five ingredients: carrots, onions, garlic, spinach, lentils. (seven if you count the stock and oil)

I make it in a 4L pot so I have enough left to freeze when I'm done. First I cut up an onion and 4 carrots. I normally only add 3 but I was trying to use them up. Cook them in a little oil in the pan until the onions are almost clear and the carrots are soft. Then add a little garlic (I didn't have fresh so used some from a jar).

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I always make extra stock when I roast any kind of beast so I usually have some in the freezer to use for soup. If you don't, you can use beef bouillon. Add 12 cups of water to the pan, bring to a boil, then add the boullion and stir a few times. Turn the heat down to simmer and add 2-3 cups lentils depending on whether you like a chunky or brothy soup. I cover the pan and simmer for 45 minutes, or until the lentils are tender. I add the spinach about 5 minutes before serving because I like it fresh. If I'm using frozen spinach, I add it when I add the lentils.

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No lectures from all of you budding chefs out there ... I know this recipe is nothing special. That was the point. It's easy and people can add whatever they want to it to make it more interesting. It's just an easy one to try if you don't cook much. Note that this recipe can be made with frozen ingredients or even freeze-dried/dehydrated ones in a SHTF scenario. :D

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Seppia
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Re: Share your recipes

Post by Seppia » Mon Nov 20, 2017 3:11 am

it looks delicious, I love lentils.
May I suggest to try add a couple bay leaves in the mix? I find the flavor goes very well with lentils

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