Fixit Log

What skills to learn, what tools to get
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5ts
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by 5ts »

Using vacuum for door locks seems like a typical German engineering exercise. Pointless when you can use the electrical system. I have never owned a Mercedes but with time travel I would go back to 1988 and drive a 190 D. Not many cars completely float my boat but that one does.

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

Yeah it is very German. It reminds me of the stories I hear about the V1 and V2 buzz bomb guidance systems that were supposedly clockworks.

5ts
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by 5ts »

Fascinating people. I study the language to try and get a glimpse into the Teutonic psyche but there is something impenetrable about them. Your repair is remarkable and this log is full of interesting examples.

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

My observation is that there is often a cultural bias for engineering solutions. Of course there is always some revolutionary mind that comes a long and changes the whole game now and then, but cultural influence in manufactured solutions is always there.

You can really feel it when you visit tech museums around the world. Japanese, German and British engineering has a particular flavor.

5ts
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by 5ts »

I agree. My predilection is towards Japanese automotive engineering. I am obsessed with reliability and they have a stellar record with that. Generally simple, robust engineering. Their tech UI is woeful, but that doesn't concern me. The Germans seem to have nailed the technology experience in new cars. Would you consider a newer Mercedes?

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

5ts wrote:
Sun Feb 02, 2020 2:47 pm
Would you consider a newer Mercedes?
Nope. I’m on some Mercedes forums and I don’t like what I read.

I worked a couple of years for NGK. They were very careful when it came to quality. It slowed things down but the products were robust. Some engineers had the single role of checking others work. They were big into Murphy’s law. I’m very happy with my Honda’s - I have a Civic, Accord and a motorcycle. They rarely break.

5ts
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by 5ts »

I have a similar view but have never owned anything German so wanted a real opinion. Seems like the 80s were peak engineering and reliability for Mercedes and possibly all German makes.

I am in the Toyota camp but there is absolutely nothing wrong with Honda and it's an option for me. I have had a Honda lawnmower, which is a notoriously finicky and high maintenance category of power equipment, and the Honda was absolutely perfect. Their engines are superb.

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

I love my Honda gcv160 mower and my Gx25 cord trimmer. They are the easiest starting small engines I’ve owned. I have a little Honda tiller too. I haven’t cranked it in ten years but I fog its cylinder with wd40 every few years and am confident it’ll fire when I need to convert my lawns into potato fields.

Honda Automatic transmissions are known to be poorly designed in some cars. I’ve owned two civics and two accords and not seen the issue. But I’ve heard when they’re bad they’re awful. My Civic has a Takata airbag and I never brought it in for the recall because I have it on PNO registration. No car is perfect. My advice on any vehicle is find a five year old model you like then go research long term user experiences before committing. It’ll help ferret out the terminal illnesses by design.

Recently Toyota has had some oil consumption issues on a few models. But again who hasn’t these days? Ok Tesla, but seriously it seems all makes has a line with oil burning.

By the way my locks stopped working today. I opened the pump and my silicone o-ring was shredded. I did a hillbilly fix of wrapping pvc electrical tape over the seal and jamming the halves together. After three attempts it worked. Maybe it’ll last till my Chinese o-rings get shipped.

Oh well. Not a perfect world. It’s easy to fall in love with our own solutions.

Riggerjack
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Riggerjack »

It reminds me of the stories I hear about the V1 and V2 buzz bomb guidance systems that were supposedly clockworks.
Everyone used clockwork guidance systems back in the day. Post WWII, everyone was using engineers from the same source.

The SCUDs fired in early nineties were clockwork guided. Not terribly accurate, but when the target is the size of a city, and clockworks are what you know...

5ts
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by 5ts »

Ah, 4 stroke Honda trimmer, the stuff dreams are made of. I despise two stroke engines and the stupid fuel mixing. My Honda mower started up first pull every single time. Sitting over winter? Did not care.

I have heard about Honda transmissions. And you're right Toyota is not immune and I stick with around 5 year old models. At least you aren't stuck with some unheard of problem and spend a fortune getting a mechanic to tease out the issue.

I was thoroughly impressed with your fix but feared it might have an early demise. O-rings are persnickety creatures in my experience. One little imperfection and they bite the dust. It was an excellent write up regardless.

SavingWithBabies
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by SavingWithBabies »

Harbor Freight sells an assortment set of SAE and another set of metric nitrile rubber o-rings. I have the SAE set on hand. I took it out and measured and there is one that is ~7.76mm OD ~4.4mm ID. Box says section is 1/16" so about 1.6mm so 1.59mm and I'm using a cheap digital caliper to measure so the numbers are not quite right. So it might have an o-ring that just might fit? Although 1.59mm is quite a bit more than 1mm so... Hrm.

For the 3d printed part, I wonder if a flexible filament would work for that application? I recently experimented with TPE. I first printed a replacement extruder piece that allowed me to put some of the bowden tube material right next to the extruder wheel so the flexible filament would feed true when forced down to the hot end. I then printed an empty rocket and the feel was interesting -- I'd expected something more like lego tires but it was more like dry rubbery feel but it did hold together. I'd guess it would last longer than the molded part. It was surprising tough just lacking in grip.

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

Yeah I have the harbor freight red box of o-rings. None fit. They were too thick. It needs to be pretty close to fit in the recess and yet not have gaps.

Yeah RJ I guess if you didn’t have clockworks you had a bottle rocket back then.

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

I’m still a 3d print newbie. I am about 75% through my first spool of PLA. TPU looks interesting but I’m afraid of getting into new filaments for now. A big jump for me is changing PLA colors. I think I’ll wait for my o-rings. I drove out to dinner tonight. The electrical tape seal worked great.

basuragomi
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by basuragomi »

One thing you might want to try in the future is pushing some fibreglass strands into the mould after the silicone fill for additional reinforcement, then scraping more silicone over top. Might reduce the blow-by you were getting. The gasket silicone might also benefit from a heated post-cure, considering its intended application.

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

Hey those are some interesting thoughts. So you’re suggesting making a fiber reinforced gasket? The gasket maker was very fragile compared to other rubber o-rings. I’ll try a little heating (boiling water first) and see what happens.

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Ego
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Ego »

The maintenance indicator wrench on the dashboard of our Honda Fit turned on last week. Over the weekend I completed the service. I thought it might be useful for others who have never done basic automobile maintenance to tackle this one. It is definitely doable for an absolute beginner.

The indicator (an orange wrench) shows up with a code, in this case the code was A12.

Just for fun I asked Mrs. Ego to call the dealer and a few local Honda shops to find out what they would charge for the service. The range was $240 at the lowest to a vague..."it probably won't be more than $500" at the highest.

I googled "2012 Honda Fit maintenance code A12" and found that it indicated the car was due for the following.

-oil change | https://youtu.be/d_KE5aK8ZuE
-oil filter change | https://youtu.be/d_KE5aK8ZuE
-cabin air filter change | https://youtu.be/LOog2qO5MJk
-engine air filter change | https://youtu.be/U2Zx-eAtR1g
-serpentine belt inspection** | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpaAbn7jDkI
-tire rotation*
-reset the maintenance indicator light | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vunL-K-VGIw

I went to the automotive parts at Walmart.com and entered my vehicle make and year then bought the parts I would need for $54.27 including 5 quarts of synthetic oil with free delivery.

*we bought the tires at Discount Tire where they will rotate them for free.
** I just looked at our serpentine belt. I did not use the tool. It looked fine.

I poured the used oil into a cat litter container I got from the recycle bin and will drop it off at one of the recycle centers the next time I am passing one.

Total time was about an hour from start to finish with most of that being cleanup time.

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

Fun to save money. I kind of laughed at the clear maintenance light action. I always have to read our accord and civic book to remember the sequence of press the button and turn the key etc. Reading pays!

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Sclass
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Sclass »

Ego wrote:
Tue Feb 11, 2020 7:39 pm

** I just looked at our serpentine belt. I did not use the tool. It looked fine.
Just thought I’d put down for next time. This tool is available in the Free Loaner tool rental program at Autozone. You don’t have to buy anything. You basically pay a slightly inflated price for the tool and then you get to return it.

davtheram12
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by davtheram12 »

@Ego
Great work! Glad to hear more members drive a Honda Fit. They are great cars. I was able to get 126K miles on the original serpentine belt for my 2011 Honda Fit. Sclass is right about renting the tool for the service. Autozone has learned that customers are more likely to buy the part from the same location where they can rent the tool.

Replacing the serpentine belt takes a little more effort since you have to remove the passenger front wheel, remove part of the wheel-well cover and front bumper splash shield and wiggle the new belt on as you fight the tension from the belt tensioner. Not too difficult but takes a little more finesse.

Gilberto de Piento
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Re: Fixit Log

Post by Gilberto de Piento »

davtheram12 wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 7:31 pm
Replacing the serpentine belt...
This can be controversial in budget car repair circles but some people like to change the belt tensioner and any idler pulleys when changing the belt. It can be cheap insurance against a breakdown.

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