ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

What skills to learn, what tools to get
ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Sun Jan 28, 2018 8:05 pm

How to tie a Purcell Prusik

A purcell prusik has many uses and should be a compliment to any rescuers gear. We can use these to climb rope, edge tend, create a bridle system for a litter, or reposition ourselves in a system. They are easily adjustable to facilitate proper placement. The size of the cordage used and the length will depend on the intended use, but once you are able to tie this knot, then it becomes easy to custom size it for custom applications or the size of your body.

Start with a fixed length of cordage.

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Organize the loose ends like this and tie a figure of eight knot:

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Now that we have a closed loop with an attachment point around eight inches long (big enough for tying a prusik if need be), we can concentrate on tying the prusik onto the body. This will give it adjustability.

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Start by placing your hand as such and wrapping your thumb three times and your pinky finger twice.

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Now touch your pinky and thumb together and take the strand that is on the back of your hand and flip it forward.

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Now slide the prusik onto your thumb. Notice that it has a 3 and 2 combination, which means that one side has three wraps and the other has two. Keep track of that.

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Now we open the prusik wide and feed the figure of eight knot through the center. Keep in mind that the three wraps must be on the uppermost part of the loop due to its increased grabbing power. If you don't want to fool with this detail simply wrap three and three.

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And finished. A set of these doesn't take much space and is very useful as well as a back-up for other applications.

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Note that when forming the loops around your fingers, this will impart a twist to the cordage. Simply undo the twists by flipping the figure of eight knot until they are gone. Make sure to do this before feeding the figure of eight into the newly formed prusik.

Riggerjack
Posts: 2667
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:09 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by Riggerjack » Wed Jan 31, 2018 5:29 pm

@ ffj
Awesome topic, thanks.

I have a request for another.

Fire protection, in particular, fire protection in rural areas. We have plenty of folks who are looking to relocate to rural areas, often some kind of homesteading arrangement.

When I started my Whidbey project, I had afire station within a mile, so I never put much thought into it. But if I were further out, some kind of fire suppression beyond a fire extinguisher would be appropriate.

I've worked in construction, and seen what a fire sprinkler does to a finished room. Fire is more destructive, but not by much. I had no interest in installing that in my house.

But looking recently, I'm seeing powder systems, and misting systems, and starting to wonder.

Have you seen any of these and the mess they leave? Is there a system you liked? What kind of improvised systems have you seen? Things that firemen wish homeowners knew and did? What have you done in your own place?

There's no hurry, and I don't want to interrupt your current thread, but I am interested in what you have to share.

Thanks in advance.

ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:21 pm

Are you wanting another thread or just answer below? How detailed do you want to get?

Riggerjack
Posts: 2667
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:09 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by Riggerjack » Thu Feb 01, 2018 10:45 am

Another thread would be easier for folks to find. Changing subjects 5 pages in would mean a lot of folks wouldn't ever see it. I like threads when they get past page 4, myself. But in the interest of information dispersal, I think a new thread at your convenience would be best.

I got on the subject by reading on yarchives.net which is a archived copy of old Usenet subjects. I can't find the section on fires and fire safety on my phone right now, I'll link to it in your thread. Lots of interesting practical improvisation there. At one point, he talked about putting some liquid storage cubes in a box van with a genny and pumps to be the new local firetruck. Another idea was converting an old septic pump truck for fire protection.

I'll dig and sift for the weirdest ideas, and you can point out the things that won't work. In the end, maybe we will have a good guide for folks far enough out that depending on local fire protection isn't a comfortable option.

ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Thu Feb 01, 2018 7:48 pm

Let me think about how I would approach it. I've been working a side job this week so I'm a little tired at the moment. There's a lot of misconceptions out there that would be fun to set straight.

Thanks for the interest.

ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:12 pm

The next few methods I am going to show are for attaching a main line and a belay to a rescue litter. I haven't shown a rescue litter set-up yet due to some logistic issues but that will coming soon.

How to tie Long-Tail Interlocking Bowlines

Long-tail bowlines are used to combine a main line and a belay line together. We can use these for low, steep, and high angle applications, specifically when attaching to a rescue litter. The long tails allow for a redundancy of attachment points for both the rescuer and the victim. This will be illustrated later.

Start by tying a bowline with a long tail. The length of the tail matters for the application used, however, for illustration purposes these will be somewhat short. I'll describe the purposes (and the length needed) once litter set-ups are addressed.

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Now here is where I want to show an alternative method of tying a bowline. This is important because of the length of the tail, because if we use the traditional method then it becomes cumbersome and slow due to a lot of rope to advance through the knot. The old method will work however, but this method is quicker. Form a simple loop as typical for a bowline:

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Now take a bight from the standing part and insert it into the loop as such:

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At this point we want to find the end of the tail and thread it through the original bowline AND the exposed bight:

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Now you can quickly pull the excess tail through the loops until you have a loop formed that is about twice as large as the original bowline. When you dress the knot the second bowline should be fairly close in size to the original.

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Grab the standing part and the loop and dress the knot by pulling in opposite directions:

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Notice the formed bowline is larger than the original. With a little practice you can get them almost identical but if this occurs than adjust it until they are both equal size.

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After adjustment:

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It may seem more complicated at first but with some practice this version of a speed bowline can become very fast to tie. And when you are dealing with long lengths it is even faster still.

The same knot with a captured ring. The ring allows multiple attachment points for the litter and attendant.

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ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:19 pm

Method two is simply taking both strands of rope and tying a bowline.

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And with a captured ring:

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ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:27 pm

Other methods involve terminated figure of eights, which is the simplest method but doesn't give you a long tail. That isn't necessarily a bad set-up, but an adjustment will have to be made for the patient belay and litter attendant.

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Lastly we can use directional eights, which I haven't covered before now, but they will allow for long tails. Some departments use them and some don't, as they are a bit harder to learn than a simple figure of eight.

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ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:50 pm

How to tie a Load Release Hitch

A load release hitch describes its purpose in its name. It is used primarily to transfer a load while a system is in transition, such as when a system is being converted from a lower to a haul. I'll demonstrate that process at a later time. It also can act as a shock absorber if used in conjunction with a belay. Although the finished product looks complicated, it is simply a couple of loops, a munter hitch, a half hitch, and a overhand knot.

Start by tying a figure eight on a bight, and lay out two carabiners. Cordage in the range of 8 or 9 millimeter is typically used and if you don't have a partner to help tie this hitch, then clip in a carabineer to a fixed object to help steady it as you tie it.

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A couple loops:

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Now we want to make a munter hitch with the tail resting on the outside:

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Now we want to shorten the system. Keep in mind that when you do this, the munter hitch will flip which is a design feature of the knot. However, we want the knot to be oriented correctly, so after shortening it, pull on the two carabiners until the knot flips back over.

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Now take a bight of rope from the tail and tie a half hitch:

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Now we finish with an overhand knot so the system when loaded will not slip:

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And done:

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ffj
Posts: 1960
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:16 am

Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Sat Mar 03, 2018 10:56 pm

An example of how to use a Load Release Hitch

One of the common uses for this device is for transitioning from a lower to a haul. Now there are other uses, passing knots for example, but I wanted to show the load release hitch in action because once one understands how it works then applying it elsewhere is much easier to comprehend.

We start by performing a lower, I'm using a Scarab here, and once we have decided we need to convert, we need to lock off the device.

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At this point we need to add the load release hitch. Technically there is no wrong way to orient this device but most people like to put the munter hitch towards the load. Simply clip in to the anchor with the other end attached to a prusik, making sure we advance the prusik up as far as we can.

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Now we can unlock and lower until the load release hitch accepts the load.

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Now it is a simple matter of removing the lowering device and adding a pulley for a 3:1 MAS.

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Now we have to remove the load release device and to do this we need to transfer the load from the LRD to the progress capture device (prusik at anchor). We do this by advancing the PCD as far as it will go and then untying the LRD and allowing the munter hitch to slowly lower until it slackens as the PCD captures the load. Now in real life we can also hold tension on the haul system to create slack to remove the load release device as it is much faster but the principle and effectiveness of the device is showcased here.

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At this point we would retie the old release hitch in case needed again and stow it out of the way. We are now prepared to haul.

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