Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

What skills to learn, what tools to get
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Sclass
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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by Sclass » Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:46 pm

ffj wrote:
Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:36 pm
Btw, that is a beautiful Japanese knife you made a sheath for a couple of pages back. Ever use the Japanese water stones to sharpen them? Oh my god, talk about a zen moment.
No. I just use a carborundum stone from a restaurant supply. I think it came from China. Works well. Two grits. $3. The knife is scary sharp. I skin salmon and mackerel with it.

I’m too cheap to get one of those Japanese stones. I saw a demo at Hida Tool in Berkeley, CA of a Japanese plane. They honed the blade on one of those stones. I was in a state of shock seeing what kind of surface finish the plane made on the block of hardwood. The guy would stop periodically to polish the blade. Expensive tools. A little outside the Sclass budget.

https://www.hidatool.com

ffj
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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by ffj » Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:11 am

That site is tool porn. I love how the Japanese design knives and tools, just beautiful. Thanks for the link.

SavingWithBabies
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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by SavingWithBabies » Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:43 pm

@Sclass We picked it up! We didn't have much time to test it but we did a zig zag stitch on an old t-shirt and the machine sounded good. I was surprised to see the included table is from Elna too. After I noticed how well it fit, that made sense. The machine is actually a 72C -- I'm not sure where 390b came from. The gentleman we bought it from was quite nice and said it was his mother's machine. That case is amazing too. Nice little holder for the pedal and the cord built in (plus as you mentioned the ability to clip it onto the machine). It feels like a really nice solid piece of machinery. My wife is very happy. Thank you!

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Sclass
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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by Sclass » Thu Dec 14, 2017 11:19 pm

Good stuff! That is a really nice machine. It was really well taken care of or not used much. You can tell by the condition of the paint on top of the arm, the wheel and no staining around the thread guides from miles of thread passing through. The 72c is a top drawer machine. It was sold concurrently with the SU 62c. Basically the same machine without the removable cams for fancy stitches. I never use the fancy stitches and just do straight and zig zag.

The free arm on these models is really useful for hemming pants and sleeves. It is also good for quickly darning socks or patching holes in jeans.

Good to hear it is functioning well. Read the manuals and keep it lubed at the red oiling holes with light machine oil and it’ll last longer than you’ll need it.

There is one selling on my Craigslist for $125 without the Elna table. One also sold on eBay recently without a box or foot control for $100 including shipping. These are collectible by a small number of crazies who know how good they are.

I don’t know if your machine came with the accessories but those also add resale value. Darning foot, satin foot, instruction manuals, darning plate and the plastic box that holds all this stuff that stows under the arm. These things often get separated by careless people who inherit the machine from Mom.

Now the fun part, using it. It’s really cool opening up the possibilities of altering second hand clothes, sewing outdoor gear, customizing your existing stuff and rescuing things from the trash. Good luck!

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Sclass
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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by Sclass » Thu Dec 14, 2017 11:29 pm

72C that makes a lot of sense. Beautiful unit.

http://tightacres.blogspot.com/2015/12/ ... c-tsp.html

You can learn something about market efficiency while chasing this stuff down. Your Annapolis Craigslist is a pretty inefficient market place. Obviously no collectors gathering up the Elna Stars (this is the line of models). eBay is more efficient and the prices go way up because it is easier to match willing buyers with sellers.

Depending on the condition and accessories one of these units can sell for up to $250. You can see the completed auctions. Yet I also found one around Thanksgiving on Craigslist selling for $40...great conditon with all the goodies (box, control, feet) being sold by the proverbial son who just lost Mom. In my case a collector had just snatched it out from under me hours before. Maybe I’d have the chance to buy it back on eBay for $200.

I’m fascinated by markets. I got squeezed in a merger last year when I had to dump some thinly held shares in a German industrial manufacturer. Same concepts of inefficiency came into play as the volume dried up before my eyes. I’m getting OT but it is neat seeing the game between people being played out.

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Sclass
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Hemming Jeans

Post by Sclass » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:23 am

SO showed up with these jeans. They are made for human giraffes - skinny waist, long legs. She needs four inches hacked off the legs. Apparently human giraffes are rare so she got these jeans nearly free on the clearance rack.

This is where the walking foot machine pays the bills.
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By my count I'm sewing through nine layers of denim at this rib on the leg. It is three layers folded three times. Try that on a conventional machine. Walking foot eats it for lunch.

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Plows right through without a skip.

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Finished hem. Nice even stitching even through the bump.

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Once again exchanging time for money. The thread is my $3 for 3000 yd Chinese Polyester "thread for jeans". Basically free. The hem time took about twenty minutes most of it was SO wondering if her ankles should show. New girl denim is very stretchy. Like elastic. I wonder if this stuff is finding its way into men's pants :lol: .

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Sclass
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Fixed a discarded rolling carryon

Post by Sclass » Sat Jul 28, 2018 11:09 pm

Alright, I found this discarded backpack. It has wheels. But it is ripped on the bottom and things fall out of the pouches on the sides. No good. I'd like to use this. So I thought I'd patch it with leather scraps, but then I realized I wanted something tougher like plastic. I dug into my junk pile and got a clorox wipes bottle and started cutting it up.

The bag:
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The damage:
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The repair material:
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Fabrication using pop rivets and cheap rivet kit from Harbor Freight:
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Use washers to back up rivets:
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The plates in place. Using rivets and sewing to secure them to the bag.
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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by SavingWithBabies » Sun Jul 29, 2018 12:33 am

Regarding the stretchy denim in men's pants, I bought some ~$12 Faded Glory jeans at Walmart after dropping a bunch of weight. They say they are 100% cotton but there is an interesting stretchiness to the material that is not at all like my other jeans. I'm fairly certain it's this listing:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Men-s-Straig ... s/51341646

Only pointing it out because there are some even cheaper jeans in that brand that I don't think had the stretchy feeling. I didn't expect much given the price but I was pleasantly surprised and went back to buy a couple more pairs. Now if the stretching in the pants you worked on was like leggings/jeggings, it wasn't quite that stretchy.

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Sclass
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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by Sclass » Sun Jul 29, 2018 9:10 am

This is exactly what I wear everyday. They’re actually pretty high quality for cheap jeans. I usually buy them on Rollback when they mark them down $0.50 :lol: When the knees wear out I make cutoffs - on the walking foot of course!

How’s the Elna TSP working out?

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Re: Inexpensive way to sew thick stuff

Post by SavingWithBabies » Mon Jul 30, 2018 10:30 am

Now I'm wondering if you posted that before and, without remembering why, I went and bought those same pants because I had the impression they were good!

The Elna TSP is working great. It hasn't gotten a lot of use yet. My wife has used it to fix the odd thing here and there. I need to redo my boat cushions so that'll probably happen at some point. I've never done piping before but it will be fun to experiment. I'll need to get both the foam and the cloth and haven't decided on those things yet but I do know I should probably try making some test cushions first to try to get the hang of it.

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Sclass
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Made a Motorcycle Cover

Post by Sclass » Sat Aug 25, 2018 1:32 pm

Here is a motorcycle cover I made with a $5.00 tarp from Harbor Freight. I wanted to "hide" my motorcycle on the side of my house and we have a nazi HOA. So I thought I'd make a nice cover. Fitted to the bike. I also installed a little vent on top to get rid of condensation. The tarp isn't breathable like the good covers. Normal sewing machine used. Polyester thread for good sun resistance.

Enjoy.

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Made the little holes with a soldering iron. It poked through like a hot knife and seared over the ragged edges of the holes.

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