Garden Log

What skills to learn, what tools to get
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Lemur
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Re: Garden Log

Post by Lemur »

Ego wrote:
Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:53 pm
We used a fake owl to scare away pigeons.
Wondering if this will work for groundhogs....

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Ego
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Re: Garden Log

Post by Ego »

@Lumur, it might work. This is the one we purchased.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx2XggUq3-A

If I were spending my own money, I would make one.

George the original one
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Location: Wettest corner of Orygun

Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

The neighbors aggressively feed birds which seems to result in the birds being so full that they leave my fruit alone. Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and apples all survive unmolested by robins, pigeons, bluejays, crows, starlings, & goldfinches. The crows do eat exposed potatoes during the winter.

Cherries might be a different matter. Before expanding the garden, the existing cherry trees bore hardly any fruit to maturity and I always blamed that on the birds, but can't be certain. Since the trees were in the way of garden expansion, I sacrificed them for firewood years ago. I plan on creating a Belgian fence of cherry trees, but that's still a few years in the future.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

What was green has turned red after a couple hot days. First berries of the season!
Image

P.S. Picked the first peas today, too.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

Pulling in the apples. Honeycrisp are ripe and Melrose are mostly ripe. Pink Lady and Thompkins-King need more time. I'd like to pull those unripe apples in due to a possible frost this weekend and a few subsequent days, but it just doesn't seem worthwhile to pick green apples, so I'll take my chances.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

Noticed one of the espalier posts was leaning today. Giving the post a slight shove, it obviously had rotted and I easily snapped it off. Sigh.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

I was a little late planting the garlic this year, think it was about Thanksgiving before the bulbs went into the ground. They're doing nicely now, with the vigorous ones having 4" leaves. Yesterday, on the lone glorious sunny day between snow and rain weeks, I spread a bag of manure/compost on the rows.

Also hacked two of the four original blueberry bushes to the ground in an effort to rejuvenate them since they weren't productive. Probably should have just pruned them correctly, but I couldn't tell which branches should be pruned and they really were getting just too big.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

Orchard cleanup day. Appropriately pruned things back. Thinking this year I may get some filberts off the trees planted 4 years ago. Planting peas is on the agenda for this sunny week, but possibly will wait until Thu or Fri since rains arrive for the weekend. Might cover some of the pea seeds a coldframe to see how that affects them.

Another chore is to replace the espalier post that rotted away at the end of last season. And digging out the raspberries that are getting outside their boundary. Hmm, I should have checked on the Columbia Star thornless blackberries to make sure they've come through the winter.

The garlic is looking fantastic.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

Skipped planting peas until today. Threw down the walla walla onion seeds, too.

Espalier post was replaced, but haven't restrung the wires yet. Glanced at the Columbia Star thornless blackberries and they didn't look very happy. Worse, though, was evidence that an Oregon brush bunny thought the leaves might be tasty.

Lucky C
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Re: Garden Log

Post by Lucky C »

I've got fourteen 5 gallon buckets filled with the Square Foot Gardening Mel's mix. All our own compost and got the buckets for free so I just had to buy peat moss and vermiculite. Actually used perlite for the first half of the buckets since that's all that was available at the time... it is larger and less coarse so it seems inferior to the vermiculite (which was also a bit more expensive) but I am hoping it doesn't make a big difference. I will plant the same plants in each, perlite vs. vermiculite, to see.

Hoping to not have any difficulties buying transplants of tomatoes/eggplant/peppers when the time comes even though COVID-19 is probably going to be widespread by that time. Not a fan of starting those from seed myself. Maybe I'll grab some as soon as they're available even if I have to keep them in smaller interim pots before rotating them into the 5 gallons after harvesting spring greens.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

Pea sprouts! I've got pea sprouts!

Just wish the birds would quit pulling up the onions.

enigmaT120
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Location: Falls City, OR

Re: Garden Log

Post by enigmaT120 »

I took out three yellow delicious trees yesterday with my tractor. One more to go. I could count on the fingers of one hand how many yellow delicious trees I need, even if all of the fingers had been amputated. But I still have about 7.

Almost done pruning the fruit trees! First time in a few years, since I had to take over the Salem office and couldn't get any time off. I did 4 grafting experiments, sacrificing 4 yellow delicious trees to try to start one each of Jazz, King, Gravenstein, and Macintosh bark grafts. I put several scions on each stump and will prune if I'm lucky enough to have any live. At worst, 4 fewer yellow delicious trees to prune and not really enjoy the apples. I'm thinking of getting some persimmons to fill in some of the gap, I love fresh fruit in the winter. People grow them down in the Willamette Valley and I'm only at 600 feet up in the coast range.

I'm eager to get all that stuff done so I can get back to thinning my forest!

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

enigmaT120 wrote:
Fri Mar 20, 2020 8:27 am
I did 4 grafting experiments, sacrificing 4 yellow delicious trees to try to start one each of Jazz, King, Gravenstein, and Macintosh bark grafts.
As they grow, remember that King are tip bearing. In the back of my mind, there's something special about Gravenstein, but it's probably its probably to do with pollenization... otherwise I don't know why I didn't plant any.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

What do people grow instead of celery? I'm so used to using celery in cooking, but have not been successful enough when growing it to have it available.

CajunQueen
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Re: Garden Log

Post by CajunQueen »

@GTOO Do you have thistle? Looks like celery but tastes like cucumber. People consider it a weed and are happy to have you hack it down.
http://plainoldkristi.blogspot.com/2009 ... stles.html

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one »

Not on the property. Bull thistle (cirsium vulgare) and Canada thistle (cirsium arvense) are common in the region, but they're invasive species, so killed on sight. The native thistles are "nicer", but rare and often confused for the invaders.

It does look like bok choy and pak choi will be my substitutes in cooking. They grow well here.

enigmaT120
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Location: Falls City, OR

Re: Garden Log

Post by enigmaT120 »

I already have a really big Gravenstein tree, that's where I got the scion for the grafting attempt. Thanks for the tip :-) about the King tree.

Gilberto de Piento
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Re: Garden Log

Post by Gilberto de Piento »

I ordered some seeds recently and I was just notified they shipped today. There is a farmers market nearby so I'm focusing on herbs mostly. Also some kale, peas, other things that are fun to grab out of the garden and incorporate into dinner.

sky
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Re: Garden Log

Post by sky »

Cornell Small Farms Online Course, free until 3/27:

https://smallfarms.cornell.edu/2020/03/ ... se-access/

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jennypenny
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Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny »

Neversink farm is also offering their farming intensive course for free (as of this morning) ... https://www.neversinkcourses.com

@sky -- which cornell courses, if any, are you taking?

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