Intro to Permaculture

What skills to learn, what tools to get
7Wannabe5
Posts: 7080
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:03 am

Re: Intro to Permaculture

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

Actually, the best stuff to store up for calamity would be rich healthy soil and some knowledge of how to grow stuff. Offers more options and resilience than over-developed plan. However, practice makes perfect, so as always “do both” is even better. Maybe start with “grow” your own soil and process nature or other human produced food first, then start planting your own.

Vaikeasti
Posts: 98
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 3:02 pm

Re: Intro to Permaculture

Post by Vaikeasti »

That's the route I've decided to take 7Wannabe5, I'm composting and learning about soil and all the edible nature around me. Being able to actually use and preserve the produce is a skill that I think will be crucial if I ever actually get my garden to produce something significant.
(Still at the same time I've been trying sprouting and growing things from seeds, and even if that usually doesn't work out, I still learn.)

I have a question regarding healthy soil, but I've become wary of starting a thread. So, I'll try here.

Does anyone have some principles on how to deal with soil that is really "moldy"?
I have around 1/3 cubic meter of soil that's been shoving mildew growth. If I just dump that somewhere (like compost) won't that spread the mildew? What can I do about it? All info regarding mildew I've found, talks about fighting it when it's on the plants, or just tells to throw everything away (which I'm obviously hoping to avoid).

7Wannabe5
Posts: 7080
Joined: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:03 am

Re: Intro to Permaculture

Post by 7Wannabe5 »

The simple answer is that all soil is moldy by design or definition, so opposite of a problem. The more complicated answer is that there are a bajillion different types of fungi which may be helpful, benign, or harmful to the propagation of any given preferred human crop. Not every mildew, whitish mold growing on surface, is of one of species of the particular mildews , such as those that cause powdery mildew, which are known to be harmful. However, if previous plantings were infected with powdery mildew, likely best bet is to dump it out in Zone 5= Wilderness.

Closing loops is tough. I am in the process of throwing a large quantity of inferior, possibly formaldehyde and/or lead leaching 1950s-70s era building materials into large dumpster on my project, because I do not personally own enough Wilderness within my boundary.

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