Anyone make their own yogurt?

What skills to learn, what tools to get
plow_2
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:27 am

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by plow_2 »

For protein I use this site. https://us.myprotein.com/sports-nutriti ... 52500.html

You can buy bulk 11 lb bags for like $70 with ever present deals. (40% off right now).
It tastes delicious. I'm currently using the whey protein in chocolate brownie ( I add to my yogurt with some oats almost daily) and vanilla. Salted Carmel is my next one to try.

Alphaville
Posts: 2801
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by Alphaville »

plow_2 wrote:
Tue Feb 23, 2021 3:20 pm
You can buy bulk 11 lb bags for like $70 with ever present deals. (40% off right now).
ah! unfortunately

& Artificial Flavor, Modified Food Starch, Sucralose, Acesulfame K

i hate that stuff :(

and apparently, so does my microbiota?

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30721958/

Frita
Posts: 638
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:43 pm

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by Frita »

I finally made yogurt (French-style in the little pots). My first attempt was a bust in the oven with the light on. I rescued it by reheating to 110 degrees, adding a bit more Fage, and using a crockpot covered in my down coat. The texture was more like a flan than yogurt. Okay, but not quite what I was hoping for. Was this the result of the rescue?

Alphaville
Posts: 2801
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by Alphaville »

Frita wrote:
Mon Mar 01, 2021 10:48 am
I finally made yogurt (French-style in the little pots). My first attempt was a bust in the oven with the light on. I rescued it by reheating to 110 degrees, adding a bit more Fage, and using a crockpot covered in my down coat. The texture was more like a flan than yogurt. Okay, but not quite what I was hoping for. Was this the result of the rescue?
flan? like, which kind? some are supersoft and uniform some are a bit chewy and separated.

was it chewy curdled? was it gummy?

and to check reality vs desire--what is it you were hoping for? what texture and tang was your target?

Frita
Posts: 638
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:43 pm

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by Frita »

Alphaville wrote:
Mon Mar 01, 2021 10:53 am


It was smooth and medium firm, like a flan you’d buy individually on the street in Mexico that wasn’t quite firm enough to pick up and eat with just fingers. No curdling or gumminess. No tang. It had an eggy taste with no eggs. Of course, it lacked the richness of eggs.

Target: creamy, medium thickness and tang.

Alphaville
Posts: 2801
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by Alphaville »

Frita wrote:
Tue Mar 02, 2021 10:21 am
the best way to achieve creaminess is to scald the milk, which denatures some proteins, and let it cool to fermentation temp before inoculating.

beyond a basic creaminess, further thickening requires straining.

commercial producers will use things like gelatin or modified starch or guar gum to create a textural illusion. also some stuff like skyr is made with rennet. some of this could affect your culture especially on first generation where it would be more abundant.

lack of tang means an insufficient fermentation, which means either the culture you used was inactive, or your temp was too low, or too high and you killed it, or you needed more time to ferment, etc.

my inoculation size is a mere 1 tbsp per quart, maybe 2tbsp at most when starting with a (weak) commercial product (i use measuring tablespoon). that seems like a small quantity but works if the culture is truly active. some commercial yogurts have inactive cultures which won't reproduce.

adding more inoculum for some reason gives me a gummy yogurt. sometimes it's not supergummy but it's a bit of a weird thickness/elasticity. this is an empirical finding, and i don't have have an understanding of why it happens, but i suspect due to casein which i think can form fibers (see: amyloid fibrils). but i don't know enough to explain it--i just observe that it happens and adjust to avoid it.

there may be other issues like population selection when culturing at different temperatures, eg favoring mesophiles over termophiles, or favoring extreme termophiles, etc. conditions matter as they exert evolutionary pressure.

most consistent way to culture for you would be to scald the milk first, then inoculate when at 40-42C, then once mixed distribute into jars, then keep at target temp as close as possible, but without turning your home into a lab.

i can't remember if fage works, some commercial cultures die on first or second generation, but i've had luck mixing a bit of this and a bit of that till something survives well. my current culture is 6 months old, i just used siggy (always starts great, might have rennet) then on 2nd or 3rd gen added a local yogurt for diversity. assuming 1 per week im on about 24th gen and going strong.

natural selection is based on variability so starting with more bacteria gives your population more survival chances.

eta: larger volumes hold on to heat better than smaller volumes so the little jars might cool too fast with just a lightbulb before fermentation begins. so you might want to submerge the small jars in a volume of hot water, for thermal regulation. i, an indelicate oaf, just lump the whole milk gallon :D

Frita
Posts: 638
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2018 8:43 pm

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by Frita »

Thanks, @Alphaville. I did another batch yesterday. It didn’t set in the crockpot so there was another rescue. (Busy skiing and then a waste-of-time Zoom board meeting.) The rescue worked but came out grainy, not quite clabbered, with some whey. The taste is a bit tangy and good. Thoughts for the next batch: 1) babysit to maintain the temperature and 2) add less inoculator.

Alphaville
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Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Location: Quarantined

Re: Anyone make their own yogurt?

Post by Alphaville »

great, congrats! fermentation and taste are the important part, so that's an improvement. please keep us posted as you discover more things.

you don't mention if the milk was scalded, but scalding helps with "setting." unscalded milk gives a more liquid / non-set yogurt even when the fermentation has been good, and it will clabber eventually due to increasing acidity, but without going trough a custardy phase facilitated by the unfolded protein. also i got grainy texture when using powdered milk for some reason.

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