ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

What skills to learn, what tools to get
ffj
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:09 pm

Just a few more knots to go before we can move on to another topic. So let's continue:

The Water or Tape Knot

This knot is used for joining webbing together and provides for a very secure knot once dressed. Start with a basic overhand knot:

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This is a basic follow-through knot:

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With alternating colors for more clarity:

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Last edited by ffj on Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

ffj
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:18 pm

The Munter

This knot allows for a controlled lowering, belaying, or even rappelling. It has a unique property that allows it to invert on a ring or carabiner and still retain its original shape and function depending on which strand is loaded.

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Under load:

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We can also tie the munter anywhere in the rope and simply clip it into a carabiner.

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Last edited by ffj on Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

ffj
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:36 pm

The Prusik

This knot is usually tied with a prussic loop. It also has a multitude of uses including belaying, ascending rope, progress capture device, or a simple rope grab. The loop is normally a smaller diameter cord or rope that is secured with a double fishermans knot, although there are variations to this rule.

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We want to wrap the rope three times:


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Once we have three wraps, the double fishermans knot that we used to help us quickly get our three wraps needs to be moved to the side so it doesn't interfere with our attachment to a carabiner. While the knot is still loose, grab a side and pull sharply. This will offset the double fishermans.

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Now we dress the knot:

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And under load. This knot is bi-directional, meaning that it locks both directions in accordance to the load being applied. It also slides rather nicely along the rope when the load is taken off.

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Gilberto de Piento
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by Gilberto de Piento » Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:36 am

Suggestion for the water knot pictures: use two different colors of webbing to make it easier to understand what is going on.

ffj
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:33 pm

@Gilberto

Fixed, thanks for the suggestion.

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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Thu Sep 14, 2017 10:47 am

The Clove Hitch

The clove hitch is a constrictor knot that performs well under constant tension. It is very easy and quick to tie and easily unties once the load is removed. However, care must be taken when slack or vibration is introduced to this knot as it can become undone if not properly minded.

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We can also tie this knot anywhere along the length of the rope. This is especially helpful if we have the ability to drop this knot over an object or clip it into a carabiner.

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Now cross the two loops as such:

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Here is a quick way of tying a clove hitch over an object. Practice this method of creating your opposing loops and you should find it is very fast. Just turn your wrists in opposite directions.

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Last edited by ffj on Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by jacob » Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:25 pm

For sailing, clove hitches are also used to quickly tie a boat to the dock cleats. So another fast way to do your second approach is to "flip the second loop around" [the second horn(*)] and pulling on the bight. This is useful when the boat is coming in under inertia (dropped sails, no engine) and the bowman has to jump off and stop the boat before it torpedoes the pier.

(*) Or in your case the end of the same pipe.

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FBeyer
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by FBeyer » Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:43 pm

The clove hitch can easily be turned into a constrictor knot. So if you know how to tie the clove, you can easily get two uses out of it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constrictor_knot

ffj
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:37 pm

There is one last knot we need to learn before we continue on to other components of a rescue system. Keep in mind that these knots need to be learned completely and thoroughly, in different settings and environments. With enough practice, it will become intuitive on how to tie any of these approved rescue knots in any rescue situation.

The Butterfly

This knot is used to create a fixed loop anywhere in a length of rope.

Method One

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ffj
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:44 pm

The Butterfly, Method Two

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FBeyer
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by FBeyer » Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:14 am

The one thing I have the hardest time with, is remembering which knots to use when. As Jacob said you use a Bowline for something specific on a boat, but that's because the particular sail you keep taught with the bowline is under constant tension. There are a lot of quirks to remembering when to use what knot/hitch and I can't figure out the system.

I gather it's someting you learn experientially, but I'd really love if there was ANY kind of system to figuring out what goes where, and when.

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Gilberto de Piento
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by Gilberto de Piento » Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:30 pm

I'm not sure about a grand unifying theory of knots but you can get training within a given context. For example, the knots ffj gave are enough for multi pitch rock climbing. If you went with an experienced partner a few times you could learn from them and know what to do in common situations. Then you could practice under their supervision and after a few times out you would know what to use where.

ffj
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Re: ffj's journal II Rope Rescue Technician

Post by ffj » Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:51 pm

@FB
Now that I've gotten the most common rescue knots named and hopefully outlined on how to tie them, we can proceed with utilizing these knots in systems. Once I start describing certain aspects of our rescue systems it will become readily apparent which knot is appropriate for that application. Notice that each knot that I have listed is approved for rescue work, and as Gilberto has indicated there is a lot of overlap in the rescue world and climbing world.

I always encourage people to learn from as many sources as possible but keep in mind that certain disciplines have certain guidelines and what is appropriate for a tower climber or arborist or rock climber may not be appropriate for rope rescue; not because these guys and gals can't perform such maneuvers but because the standards are different. And standards are set by different agencies and authorities having jurisdiction.

Anyway, I'll be showing how these knots are utilized shortly.

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