More on Microbiome

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7Wannabe5
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Sun Jan 24, 2016 9:18 am

So, if you are polyamorous and frequently hug and share food with moderately grubby children whose parents regularly travel back and forth to Yemen and Bangladesh etc. and you eat a lot of pickles,sauerkraut and unwashed organic garden produce, then you will be very happy and live a very long time. Right? Is there something else I should be doing?

tonyedgecombe
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by tonyedgecombe » Tue Jan 26, 2016 8:06 am


7Wannabe5
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Tue Jan 26, 2016 11:18 am

No shortcut to observing your own reactions and responses and dis-eases, both in the moment and over time (sigh.) Took me forever to realize that oatmeal with chopped up apple was not a good breakfast for "me" because I would always crash on it, whereas a slice of leftover pizza gave "me" no difficulties.

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Ego
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Ego » Wed Jan 27, 2016 8:59 pm

Free 5-site ubiome kit for seniors (65+)
http://ubiome.com/pages/senior-sale

John Cryan on a nutrition podcast talking about the microbiome, stress, the brain and behavior.
http://sigmanutrition.com/episode105

He speaks about fecal transplant and anxiety. Interesting.

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Ego
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Ego » Thu Mar 10, 2016 10:07 pm

More than two months since Ubiome has received my samples and still no results. I could have sequenced them myself in that amount of time.

jennypenny
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by jennypenny » Fri Mar 11, 2016 5:55 am

Maybe the contents of your soylent have them stumped? ;)

No results here either (submitted after you though).

7Wannabe5
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:56 am

Just learned of something that may be of interest. One of the reasons why many perma-culturists believe that soil should be tilled as infrequently as practical/possible is that the complex microbial system within the less oxygenated soil is destroyed in favor of quick carbon burn due to exposure to oxygen. So, one technique used to rebuild microbial diversity in depleted soil is to take a long stocking and fill it with white rice, then go find the most advanced, complex, undisturbed ecosystem in your region and dig a deep hole in the forest soil and bury the stocking for a month or three. Then you dig it up and let the microbial population further grow in a barrel of molasses water. Then you use this water to inoculate your garden soil.

Of course, it obviously follows that you could also eat the rice after it has been deep woods microbe inoculated.

I wonder how long it would take for a Twinkie to be inoculated if you buried it? -lol

vroom
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by vroom » Thu Apr 07, 2016 9:43 am

Make sure you log in to your Ubiome account on the website. I never got an email saying my results were in, but they had been posted to my account without warning when I finally decided to check.

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Ego
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Ego » Wed May 18, 2016 7:25 am

Eat dirt. :?

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 051616.php

Injections of the soil bacterium Mycobacterium vaccae promote stress resilience and improve coping behaviors in mice, according to a new study

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Ego
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Ego » Sat May 28, 2016 7:07 am

Podcast (starts 5:13)

http://howonearthradio.org/archives/5403

Our Microbes, Ourselves: Soil Bacteria Treat Stress Disorders

Microbes and Stress Resilience If you’re worried that some dirt still clings to your skin under your fingernails after planting or weeding in the garden, fear not. In fact, the more you feel and even breathe its fumes, the better, research suggests. As part of our series called “Our Microbes, Ourselves,” we explore today a newly published study that adds to a growing body of research into the benefits of certain soil and gut microbes on our mental and physical health. Dr. Christopher Lowry, an associate professor of integrative physiology at the University of Colorado-Boulder, discusses with host Susan Moran the study, which he led. It shows that a common soil bacterium called M. vaccae can boost the immune system to help fight stress and inflammation. The research, published last week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was conducted on mice, but the health implications for humans are far-reaching.

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Ego
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Ego » Sun Jun 05, 2016 10:32 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/05/opini ... .html?_r=0

People living just over the border in Russian Karelia, as the region is known, have the same prevalence of genes linked to autoimmune disease. They also live at the same latitude and in the same climate. And yet they have a much lower vulnerability to autoimmune disease. Celiac disease and Type 1 diabetes occur about one-fifth and one-sixth as often, respectively, in Russian Karelia as in Finland.

Dr. Xavier and his colleagues followed 222 children who were genetically at risk of developing autoimmune diabetes.

After three years, 16 Finnish children and 14 Estonian children had these antibodies; only four Russian children did. And when the scientists compared the children’s microbiomes in the three countries, they found stark differences.
....

Why was the Russian microbiome so different? ...

Mikael Knip, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Helsinki and a senior author on the study, describes Russian Karelia as resembling Finland before World War II. It’s relatively poor. Many families in the study drink untreated well water. Russian kids have more fecal oral infections, such as hepatitis A, suggesting more sharing not only of pathogens, but of microbes that may benefit health. And previous studies have found that Russian homes harbor a richer and more diverse community of microbes than Finnish ones.

jennypenny
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by jennypenny » Mon Jun 06, 2016 6:04 am

Ego wrote:Russian homes harbor a richer and more diverse community of microbes than Finnish ones.
I can't wait to use that excuse the next time my MIL complains about my housekeeping skills.

My GI doc speculates that a lot of the maladies that he sees, from celiac to IBS, are due to the lack of raw and homegrown food foods consumed by people today. He admits he can't prove it, it's just a pattern he's seen over 40 years.


re: the other post ... I've never met an unhappy gardener. I can't even think of anyone I've ever seen who was angry or agitated when working in their garden (except Mr. McGregor). Curious.

cmonkey
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by cmonkey » Mon Jun 06, 2016 12:06 pm

jennypenny wrote:re: the other post ... I've never met an unhappy gardener. I can't even think of anyone I've ever seen who was angry or agitated when working in their garden (except Mr. McGregor). Curious.

You should have seen me last week....few days after we got our fence completed. Little petra cottontail went hopping from the back of our property, all 250 feet up to the front where we have ONE gate. We had it open and she hops up to it. I am outside the garden and I see her looking to go in.....the only thing I could think of was to tear after her and of course the only way she'll go is in the gate. :evil: Call me Mr McCmonkey I guess.

jennypenny
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by jennypenny » Fri Mar 10, 2017 11:56 am


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Ego
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Ego » Sun Mar 12, 2017 2:28 pm

Choline and L-carnitine are converted by bacteria in the gut into TMAO. High levels of TMAO in the blood are associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trimethyl ... lth_issues

Vegans do not have the bacteria in their gut to make the conversion.
http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to- ... ecosystem/

Smashter
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Smashter » Mon Mar 13, 2017 12:52 pm

Not everyone agrees that eggs, meat, and TMAO are evil.

"If food really did make a significant contribution to TMAO levels, and high TMAO levels cause heart disease, then we’d expect to see much higher rates of CHD among people who eat more fish—since fish has a much greater effect on TMAO than eggs. Yet this is the opposite of what studies indicate: Eating more fish (especially cold-water, fatty fish) has consistently been shown in both observational and randomized controlled trials to reduce the risk of death from heart disease."

https://chriskresser.com/choline-and-tm ... t-disease/

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Ego
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Ego » Mon Mar 13, 2017 1:16 pm

Scroll down and read a few of the comments. Especially Jeff Guarino's.

Smashter
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by Smashter » Mon Mar 13, 2017 3:59 pm

It's definitely a tricky issue and one that I want to read more about. I feel strongly that eggs and liver have health benefits, which of course means I tend to block out contradictory evidence :) So, thank you for pushing me out of my comfort zone. I had never bothered to read the comments.

I still think there's more to the story than "choline is bad." The study Jeff Guarino mentions in his comment is no longer accessible from the original article. The two other citations Mr. Guarino takes umbrage with seem to be very legit and to support Chris Kresser's hypothesis.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... CABF2C166B

https://academic.oup.com/ije/article/32 ... e8539.atom

Also, know that I am in 100% agreeance with you that gut health is incredibly important and should be paid attention to. I also despise factory farming, and would not be surprised if beef and eggs from factory farms had harmful effects when compared with pasture raised animals.

vexed87
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by vexed87 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 4:33 am

Ego wrote:An excellent video on resistant starch and microbiome.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NI3KtR3 ... e=youtu.be
+1, really enjoyed that.

jennypenny
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Re: More on Microbiome

Post by jennypenny » Mon Apr 03, 2017 6:16 am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iKHMyWzclM

I'm continually amazed at the effect the microbiome has on our health. The speed with which it can be changed is very encouraging.


**Should this topic be moved into Health?

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