COVID-19

Health, Fitness, Insurance, ...
George the original one
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Re: COVID-19

Post by George the original one »

COVID-19 Deaths

USA passed up France in per capita deaths this morning when we crossed 148,011
That puts the USA as 10th worst in the world. The only reason we're not 8th worst is that Chile & Peru passed us up in the past two weeks.

But, wait, if don't bother counting the tiny city-states of San Marino and Andorra, we're 8th worst.

https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/data/mortality

George the original one
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Re: COVID-19

Post by George the original one »

One more thing to add... at the current weekly death rate, exceeding Italy & Spain's COVID-19 per capita death rate appears possible by the end of September. Yes, did you ever think we'd be saying the USA has a worse per capita death rate than Italy?!?

2Birds1Stone
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Re: COVID-19

Post by 2Birds1Stone »

George the original one wrote:
Tue Jul 28, 2020 8:28 pm
Yes, did you ever think we'd be saying the USA has a worse per capita death rate than Italy?!?
Yes, https://www.who.int/healthinfo/paper30.pdf?ua=1

The USA's healthcare system is ranked 37th according to this whitepaper. Italy is #2.

chenda
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Re: COVID-19

Post by chenda »

2Birds1Stone wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 4:08 am
Yes, https://www.who.int/healthinfo/paper30.pdf?ua=1

The USA's healthcare system is ranked 37th according to this whitepaper. Italy is #2.
I doubt though that in itself is having a big impact on Corona outcomes, at least within first world societies. Afaik the US is providing free Corona care to its citizens

Peanut
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Re: COVID-19

Post by Peanut »

Doesn’t surprise me at all. U.S. population is very unhealthy compared to the Italians.

Hristo Botev
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Re: COVID-19

Post by Hristo Botev »

Peanut wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 9:22 am
Doesn’t surprise me at all. U.S. population is very unhealthy compared to the Italians.
I'm not necessarily on board with the proposed solutions--e.g., my experience as a lawyer who works with restaurant clients in the U.S. is that mandating calorie disclosures, etc., just means I make more money interpreting government regulations, creating larger barriers of entry, etc.--BUT, I absolutely LOVE the identification of the (or a) problem by Boris Johnson here: https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/27/uk/boris ... index.html. If only our government leaders would use their bully pulpits and use COVID as an excuse to encourage "my fellow Americans" to do their civic duty and quit eating so much shit. Wear a mask? Sure. Stay at home as much as possible? Ok. But how about, also, put down the fried food, get off your ass, and go for a walk in the sunshine? Do it for 'Merica damnit!

chenda
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Re: COVID-19

Post by chenda »

@Hristo Botev Can BMI impact health insurance premiums, or is too invisible or marginal to incentivise weight loss ?

Hristo Botev
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Re: COVID-19

Post by Hristo Botev »

chenda wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 11:33 am
@Hristo Botev Can BMI impact health insurance premiums, or is too invisible or marginal to incentivise weight loss ?
That's a really interesting question that I know nothing about, and I suspect is REALLY complicated, but I would love to hear from those who know more. My own anecdotal experience is, as I recall, I've never been required to get a physical or anything of the sort in connection with setting my health insurance premium. Frankly, I really have no idea how insurance premiums are set. I definitely DID have to get a physical/blood work to find out what my monthly payment would be for my term life insurance policy--and the higher your BMI, etc., the higher your payment is.

Viktor K
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Re: COVID-19

Post by Viktor K »

chenda wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 6:39 am
Afaik the US is providing free Corona care to its citizens
Source? I remember hearing conflicting anecdotal evidence of man right before being vented (he later died), “Who is going to pay for this?”

Maybe it was more in the “be held accountable” sense of the word, and not referring to financial obligations.

And recent article implying testing is paid for, treatment is not:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cincin ... 5513902002

jacob
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Re: COVID-19

Post by jacob »

US testing is free. This was part of one of the early acts signed into law.

Some insurance companies and some states(?) cover all treatment expenses.

Otherwise a COVID hospital trip is billed at ~$20-30,000 rising to $75,000+ if going on a ventilator.

CS
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Re: COVID-19

Post by CS »

Hristo Botev wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 11:46 am
I definitely DID have to get a physical/blood work to find out what my monthly payment would be for my term life insurance policy--and the higher your BMI, etc., the higher your payment is.
Our tester had a "calibrated" scale that was 10 lbs off, i.e. showed a weight lighter than it really was - which benefited most people. As someone with a real BMI of 18.5-19, it put me in the anorexic category, which I certainly am not! (Not all of my physicians scales could have been that far off.) The insurance was so expensive that we skipped it. Luckily that turned out to be a good decision in the long run.

Hristo Botev
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Re: COVID-19

Post by Hristo Botev »

CS wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 1:54 pm
Our tester had a "calibrated" scale that was 10 lbs off, i.e. showed a weight lighter than it really was.
I need to get one of those scales for personal use.

AnalyticalEngine
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Re: COVID-19

Post by AnalyticalEngine »

One of my employers once did a health screening. If you passed, you got $300. They tested BMI, cholesterol, blood pressure, and presence of nicotine. My guess is the insurance company offered the company a discount if they did this since policies are negotiated on a per-company basis.

I had many coworkers in their late 20s/early 30s fail the test, largely due to high blood pressure and nicotine.

Hristo Botev
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Re: COVID-19

Post by Hristo Botev »

AnalyticalEngine wrote:
Wed Jul 29, 2020 6:09 pm
One of my employers once did a health screening. If you passed, you got $300. They tested BMI, cholesterol, blood pressure, and presence of nicotine. My guess is the insurance company offered the company a discount if they did this since policies are negotiated on a per-company basis.

I had many coworkers in their late 20s/early 30s fail the test, largely due to high blood pressure and nicotine.
My old firm was self-insured and so always did health/wellness incentive programs; DW's employer does that as well. I think that's great. But do/can we charge higher premiums on an individual basis for folks who are in higher risk pools? Is there some sort federal law that prohibits that kind of thing?

jacob
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Re: COVID-19

Post by jacob »

Meta-study: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanc ... 9/fulltext

Eye protection reduces the infection rate by a factor ~3 (from 16% to 5%).

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AEXKR4C/ works well with cloth masks but even after removing the foam, the nose bridge interferes with my respirator. I'm thus stuck with leaving a gap or using my shooting glasses where the nose bridge can be removed for better coverage. Not sure what the ideal solution here is ... maybe more DIY finagling is in order.

Note that the 3M is sold with various lenses like clear (linked), smoke, mirror, ...

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jennypenny
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Re: COVID-19

Post by jennypenny »

We are flying back from SD on a smaller jet, and we were informed that masks with valves/vents or basically anything that looked like a respirator or construction mask was prohibited on board. We were told similar rules with an upcoming hospital visit for my son.

Just FYI in case this is a new trend. People might need to keep a standard-issue face mask with them in case they run into this.

jacob
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Re: COVID-19

Post by jacob »

Sclass mentioned similar enforcement restrictions in the DIY mask thread. I already carry both because I have no interest in getting into a longer argument/explanation about my add-on exhalation filter vs a cloth mask.

Given the different situations one encounters. I'd presume that in a controlled environment, everybody would wear masks anyway, so I'm okay with switching to cloth. Whereas in a sloppy environment with a mix of maskless and masked humans, I'd get to keep my P100. In either case the protection for me is high.

Viktor K
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Re: COVID-19

Post by Viktor K »

Our solution to this has been keeping our N99, vented vog masks on, with a surgical mask to double up with somewhere in pack.

I get that the valve means exposing others, but I prefer the n99 protection.

Also on mine, the exhaust valve doesn’t pop open without good effort / I am exercising or exerting myself. So for normal use, I assume still protects others as well as if not better than cloth/surgical.

AnalyticalEngine
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Re: COVID-19

Post by AnalyticalEngine »

@Hristo Botev - I'm a bit hazy on the details, so take this with a grain of salt, but iirc, one of the main things about the affordable care act was prohibiting insurance companies from charging you higher premiums based on preexisting conditions. Being obese, having high blood pressure, etc all counts as a preexisting condition, and so they can't charge higher premiums for that. Heck, in some states, they can't even charge you higher premiums based on your age.

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Re: COVID-19

Post by jacob »

https://www.statnews.com/2020/07/27/cov ... rt-damage/

Open link to actual paper in the statnews link.
statnews wrote: One study examined the cardiac MRIs of 100 people who had recovered from Covid-19 and compared them to heart images from 100 people who were similar but not infected with the virus. Their average age was 49 and two-thirds of the patients had recovered at home. More than two months later, infected patients were more likely to have troubling cardiac signs than people in the control group: 78 patients showed structural changes to their hearts, 76 had evidence of a biomarker signaling cardiac injury typically found after a heart attack, and 60 had signs of inflammation.
The CV19 group was identified by testing positive on a standard swab test. People who were already identified as cardiac patients were excluded. The groups was thus comprised of people who tested positive with no known prior heart conditions.

That's worse cardiac signs than people in the control group after it was adjusted for pre-existing risk-factors like hypertension, diabetes, smoking, asthma, etc. So unless, there's some unknown-unknown risk factor that the statistical elimination failed to capture ...
paper wrote: Unlike these previous studies, our findings reveal that significant cardiac involvement occurs independently of the severity of original presentation and persists beyond the period of acute presentation, with no significant trend toward reduction of imaging or serological findings during the recovery period. Our findings may provide an indication of potentially considerable burden of inflammatory disease in large and growing parts of the population and urgently require confirmation in a larger cohort.
... meaning effects linger unchanged for at least 2 months. Given how heart damage appears common, the following the precautionary principle seems to be in order.

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