How do different work environments encourage different social systems and lifestyles?

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AnalyticalEngine
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How do different work environments encourage different social systems and lifestyles?

Post by AnalyticalEngine » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:27 pm

I'm curious everyone's experience here with different types of work environments. What's been your experience working in corporate, blue color, pink color, service jobs, etc? Did you find the nature of the job changed how your coworkers interacted? Did the job feel more like a lifestyle than a job?

In my experience, the corporate world feels more like a lifestyle than a job, especially for people concerned with climbing the ladder or building their "personal brand." Additionally, it had elements of high school where it seems like everyone secretly hates each other. This type of environment isn't impossible to navigate, but it does require some unique strategies to make it out with your identity in tact.

Riggerjack
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Re: How do different work environments encourage different social systems and lifestyles?

Post by Riggerjack » Wed Aug 28, 2019 7:35 am

Well, if you get out of your career with your identity intact, I think you may have failed. Failed to learn all that you could have.

You are there, learn what you want, and be choosey.

There is lots of dysfunction in the bottom of every organization. Blue collar has different dysfunction than white, in my experience, but not less. Well, maybe less, but definitely different.

As for the career ladder, avoiding that set of dysfunctions is why you are here, right?

chenda
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Re: How do different work environments encourage different social systems and lifestyles?

Post by chenda » Wed Aug 28, 2019 8:03 am

I probably impacts childbirth age; women with limited possibilities for career advancement will tend to have children earlier than women with more career advancement. The opportunity cost of early motherhood is much lower.

Hence the shorter generation span for poorer families and the associated higher birth rates, stream of broken relationships and all round trashiness. At least, that's been my experience.

7Wannabe5
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Re: How do different work environments encourage different social systems and lifestyles?

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Wed Aug 28, 2019 8:29 am

I have observed that I am treated with a good deal less respect when I occasionally accept a job to substitute for a para-professional rather than a professional teaching position, if I am otherwise not known at the school. Since I don't dress or behave any differently, and often I don't even realize I pushed the "wrong" button until I show up, this effect is entirely due to expectations. For instance, if it is known that I am qualified to teach, but am just fulfilling para-pro role for the day, I will more likely be asked if I would mind doing somebody the favor of making copies vs. being told to do this task. This social "class" separation is also apparent in lunchroom conversational behavior.

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RFS
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Re: How do different work environments encourage different social systems and lifestyles?

Post by RFS » Sat Aug 31, 2019 8:10 am

I think it depends a lot on the type of person your workplace & department attracts. I worked for a gigantic tech corporation in college. When I got hired, they sent me a letter about how people come there to do their life's best work. I met several weird as hell Silicon Valley people obsessed with optimizing every minute detail of their lives. But, amidst all of that, management knew that burnout would mitigate productivity. We were constantly encouraged to disconnect from work and take care of ourselves (this was probably just lip service.)

I worked at a tech startup after that. In sales. My office was predominantly unmarried 20-somethings, with terrible spending problems, vying for one position that nearly doubled your pay. Every day required swimming through a river of conniving bullshit. People would go to team meetings and intentionally give others bad advice.

I'm a teacher now. It's the healthiest workplace environment I've ever experienced, because it's actually collaborative. Everyone's on the same team and wants to help each other. Plus, nobody goes into it for the money, and the age range of everyone there is 21-60+. This means many of your colleagues have families that they actually believe are more important than work.

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