Take it or leave it?

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Ponderosa
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:46 pm

Take it or leave it?

Post by Ponderosa » Thu Aug 02, 2018 12:14 pm

This is a follow up to my previous post where I was looking for help in deciding to look for another job in another city.

Well my wife found something first. It is closer to friends and family which is a plus, and it is a super opportunity for her. I have been able to secure full time employment with my own company working completely remotely. The work itself is quite boring, but its high pay and probably is going to be very easy. I have already told them I would do it, but I am having a few second thoughts.

I would absolutely be able to find something else in the new city in the same industry. Problem is I am not sure what I want to do yet. I have been thinking of brushing up on my programming skills or pursuing another degree in that area. I have done a fair amount of self study in the past year and I find it very interesting.

I'm a bit worried that taking this opportunity (the length of this remote work is uncertain, too) would prevent me from taking time to explore some new areas and decide what I want to do. On the other hand, I can use it as a way to continuing funding my retirement accounts while simultaneously exploring new career paths.

On a side note - does anyone think getting another degree in computer science is the right way to go for long term satisfaction in that field? I applied to an online program which would take 1.5 years and cost about 28k - which isn't bad but still considerable cost considering I already have a MSc in Physics. My thoughts are I would having longer term opportunities with that base of knowledge. On the other hand, there is a very reputable boot camp in this new city that has a independently verified 94% placement rate into relevant positions within 6 months of graduation with a starting salary of 60-70k. Granted most of those jobs are analyst or web development positions, but might not be a bad way to get into that field.

My goal is to build a technically challenging career while working towards financial independence - but not necessary pursuing early retirement at any cost. That may change with time, which is why I am trying to build a marketable set of skills in a field that pays well so I always have that option going forward. I find that employers are a bit confused on what to do with my Masters degree - either that or I don't know how to market it quite yet.

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Riggerjack
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Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:09 am

Re: Take it or leave it?

Post by Riggerjack » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:12 pm

I wish I could help, but my own expertise is in other areas.

But reading over your post, I am confused by your hesitation. Your wife found work that works for her, is closer to friends and family, and you can work remotely.

What is the problem? That looks like a set of solutions, all lined up.

What to do if you lose the remote job? Get another one. Or not, as appropriate. That's the beauty of dual incomes, the flexibility to allow career development, if that's what you want.

Everything does not need to be optimal for you to make your next move, it just needs to be better than the current arrangement. You seem to have that. Move to the new city, work the new jobs, and see what you want to do then.

Or not. It's your life, but it seems simple enough from here. Good luck.

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Chris
Posts: 595
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 2:44 pm

Re: Take it or leave it?

Post by Chris » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:15 pm

Ponderosa wrote:
Thu Aug 02, 2018 12:14 pm
On a side note - does anyone think getting another degree in computer science is the right way to go for long term satisfaction in that field?
Nope. There are lots of people with science backgrounds (especially physicists) that have turned their programming hobby into careers. The CS field relies a lot on practical skills. If you know one programming language, and have completed some personal projects, you can get a job.

That's not to say that the theory side of CS is useless -- there are fundamentals that are valuable to know in the long run -- but you can be quite productive without knowing them.

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BRUTE
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Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 5:20 pm

Re: Take it or leave it?

Post by BRUTE » Fri Aug 03, 2018 12:39 am

Ponderosa wrote:
Thu Aug 02, 2018 12:14 pm
On a side note - does anyone think getting another degree in computer science is the right way to go for long term satisfaction in that field? I applied to an online program which would take 1.5 years and cost about 28k - which isn't bad but still considerable cost considering I already have a MSc in Physics.
absolutely not. MSc is overqualified for all except the most specialized programming positions. and even then, MSc in physics is probably a better baseline than MSc in CS.

there are exactly 3 things in CS that are "science", everything else is practice and plumbing:
1)Big O notation for algorithmic complexity (constant, linear, logarithmic, exponential) (aka not putting loops in other loops)
2)Relational databases exist for a reason. No need to re-invent them every decade.
3).. there's probably a 3rd one, but it escapes brute right now. sorry. oops

Mister Imperceptible
Posts: 441
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 4:18 pm

Re: Take it or leave it?

Post by Mister Imperceptible » Fri Aug 03, 2018 5:52 am

Take the $$$ first, figure the other stuff out later. If you’re working from home and the job is easy, you can even find time to be even more productive and perhaps make more money elsewhere. Stick it out for awhile. Especially as you are new to actual work after getting your Master’s, you need both money and job experience. I don’t envy the mid-thirty-something PhD’s who are trying to get their first jobs.

Ponderosa
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:46 pm

Re: Take it or leave it?

Post by Ponderosa » Fri Aug 03, 2018 3:14 pm

Thanks everyone for your replies. I was hesitating mainly because the company has been frustrating to deal with and my overall satisfaction is low. Its tempting to just say screw it and cut ties. On the positive side, I will dodge a ton of politics and people I'm frustrated with by this set up so I might actually like it. Plus, if it doesn't work out - I can always cut it later and find something else.

On the computer science side I'm glad people here think another degree is a bad idea. I think I would enjoying learning all the topics involved in a traditional computer science program, but I think I can learn that independently on the side. Plus I'm more interested in a building cool things and becoming an expert on the practical side.

The real question is if I should shoot for something like data science or traditional software/web development. I think data science would be cool since I've done a bit of it in the past but it seems like there isn't a ton of opportunity out there unless you live in one of the mega tech centers of the US. To me it seems like there is a higher demand for professionals who can work in a business like setting developing their software or software for customers (especially where I'm moving). If I go this route there is an awesome bootcamp in this area that has strong connections with many companies in the vicinity.

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BRUTE
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Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 5:20 pm

Re: Take it or leave it?

Post by BRUTE » Fri Aug 03, 2018 10:23 pm

Ponderosa wrote:
Fri Aug 03, 2018 3:14 pm
To me it seems like there is a higher demand for professionals who can work in a business like setting developing their software or software for customers (especially where I'm moving). If I go this route there is an awesome bootcamp in this area that has strong connections with many companies in the vicinity.
approved

Augustus
Posts: 487
Joined: Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:15 am

Re: Take it or leave it?

Post by Augustus » Mon Aug 06, 2018 8:52 pm

BRUTE wrote:
Fri Aug 03, 2018 10:23 pm
Ponderosa wrote:
Fri Aug 03, 2018 3:14 pm
To me it seems like there is a higher demand for professionals who can work in a business like setting developing their software or software for customers (especially where I'm moving). If I go this route there is an awesome bootcamp in this area that has strong connections with many companies in the vicinity.
approved
+1

Get your foot in the door and get 1 year of real work experience and you can pretty much write your own ticket in software. I had no degree for the first 15 years of my career, it was a hobby, then I got an internship, and then I was a professional and people wanted to pay me.

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