Memorable Documentaries

Favorite quotations, etc.
tylerrr
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by tylerrr »

ffj wrote:I enjoy a good documentary, and I thought I would list some of them that have been memorable or high quality. I am hoping the rest of you will list your favorites also. I would only ask that the ones with a heavy-handed agenda be left out, but any subject is open.

Some favorites:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtyY0CXdiNo
This one will break your heart; it's worth watching however.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WldZazpFy7I
Politics, revenge, and human weakness

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdJYzgJ4CwI
Greed and vanity

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOUYPnpJsK0
Really interesting

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79IUKC9gS-8
Really fun to watch

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xC5bpPfltOI
Holy crap

I'll list more as I think of them. Everybody please join in.
Last one on the list proves the existence of Evil.....Incredible.

BRUTE
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by BRUTE »

tylerrr wrote:Last one on the list proves the existence of Evil.....Incredible.
if tylerrr thinks Cartel Land proves the existence of Evil, brute invites him to watch "The Act of Killing"

Dragline
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by Dragline »

Those last two are interesting because they are mimetic rivals -- effectively mirror images. Both of them are about the relationship between unofficial violence and official violence. With an anarchical society you have the first film (gangs and vigilantes). The latter is used to crush the former and restore order, thereby granting a state-monopoly on future violence. Of course, what is "official" is often established in hindsight by the winners.

Welcome to "How large human societies were traditionally formed and what happens when they fall apart 101."

tylerrr
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by tylerrr »

Dragline wrote:Those last two are interesting because they are mimetic rivals -- effectively mirror images. Both of them are about the relationship between unofficial violence and official violence. With an anarchical society you have the first film (gangs and vigilantes). The latter is used to crush the former and restore order, thereby granting a state-monopoly on future violence. Of course, what is "official" is often established in hindsight by the winners.

Welcome to "How large human societies were traditionally formed and what happens when they fall apart 101."
:cry:

Riggerjack
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by Riggerjack »

. Those last two are interesting because they are mimetic rivals -- effectively mirror images. Both of them are about the relationship between unofficial violence and official violence. With an anarchical society you have the first film (gangs and vigilantes). The latter is used to crush the former and restore order, thereby granting a state-monopoly on future violence. Of course, what is "official" is often established in hindsight by the winners.

Welcome to "How large human societies were traditionally formed and what happens when they fall apart 101.
Yeah, well there a difference of scale so different as to nearly be a comparison of apples to elephants. The scars on society of thousands of murders/year vs millions reflect this. Talk to Mexicans about avoiding drug violence, and you will get a completely different description from what a Cambodian would say about living to 1980, or a Chinese farmer living through the Glorious Revolution.

When you are on the wrong side of a gang, you can always try escaping their territory. When governments start purging citizens, escape is usually no longer an option.

When government gets into killing mode, it shows there is still at least one area where they can excel beyond private industry.

Dragline
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by Dragline »

You might find Ian Morris's recent book about War and violence interesting. For audio cliff notes, watch this starting at around 4:00 to about 20:00 and continue on if you find it interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebRpquKFSEw

I would say I'm in partial agreement with it. What's actually more interesting to me is that is seems to be a variant on Rene Girard's mimetic theory, even though Morris says he never read Girard (elsewhere -- they were both at Stanford in different departments). When people with different training/agendas/ideas arrive in roughly the same place after long journeys of research and thought, I tend to pay attention.

ffj
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by ffj »

@tylerr

What struck me more than anything about Cartel Land is how the film makers kept from ending up in a shallow grave themselves. That and how absolutely corrupt everyone was in the movie. Everyone had reverted to the lowest common denominator.

theanimal
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by theanimal »

I really enjoyed Cartel Land. That was horrifying. Like ffj, I'm surprised the cameramen didn't end up in a body bag. I'm glad I don't live in Mexico or near the border.

I didn't like Cowspiracy at all. Sure, the facts are interesting but the presentation is awful. The director/narrator tries to dramatize everything and make it seem like its life or death. He also expects everyone to know these not so common facts and accuses them of hiding something or lying. It's also very repetitive and drawn out. It could have been reduced to about a 15 min clip at most. I'm not biased against it either, I'm vegan. Documentaries like Food Inc. and one on corn (I forget the title) are much better.

BRUTE
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by BRUTE »

ffj wrote:What struck me more than anything about Cartel Land is how the film makers kept from ending up in a shallow grave themselves.
+1. brute was convinced the movie was a dramatic re-enactment by actors, there was no way they would let somebody film them doing that shit. but no.
ffj wrote:That and how absolutely corrupt everyone was in the movie. Everyone had reverted to the lowest common denominator.
this is why brute is convinced there is no "evil" in the world. there is no moral character inherent to humans, as much as they want to believe it. it's just humans with the opportunity to abuse power.

ffj
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by ffj »

@brute

I'm not much of a philosopher, but if opportunity for abuse exists, abuse will occur. This I agree with.

The goal should always be to take away the incentive for abuse.

Dragline
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by Dragline »

The modern trend is to merge them. But its overly simplistic to say that either is necessarily more efficient -- and that efficiency is necessarily a good thing from the perspective of an outsider.

Franz Kafka's "The Trial" and Mike Judge's "Office Space" have an awful lot in common. I wonder if Joseph K. had to fill out TPS reports.

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Ego
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by Ego »

vexed87 wrote:Cowspiracy, best thing I saw so far this year, it's about animal agriculture, sustainability and overpopulation. - http://www.cowspiracy.com/
Saw a billboard in my area this morning based on Cowspiracy, though I think the gallon figures are higher than those I read elsewhere.

Image

BRUTE
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by BRUTE »

Dragline wrote:Franz Kafka's "The Trial" and Mike Judge's "Office Space" have an awful lot in common. I wonder if Joseph K. had to fill out TPS reports.
brute missed this the last time. good observation.

brute thinks the broader category for this genre might be about systems initially created to help humans, but where the main goal/effect has become sustaining the system/status quo itself. in other words, bureaucracy.

shade-tree
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by shade-tree »

Waste Land. It's about recyclers at a garbage dump in Rio, Brazil.

ffj
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by ffj »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wf2txEIcg6E

This may be a little bit melodramatic for some of you but I saw a lot of parallels with the forum, with talk of establishing our own community, polyamory, independence, philosophy, etc. It was a really interesting history of the Galapagos that didn't involve animals, but all of the trappings of human failure in a small group of eight people.

tylerrr
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Re: Memorable Documentaries

Post by tylerrr »

ffj wrote:@tylerr

What struck me more than anything about Cartel Land is how the film makers kept from ending up in a shallow grave themselves. That and how absolutely corrupt everyone was in the movie. Everyone had reverted to the lowest common denominator.
Yes, and it's nice to know many of those lovely types live here in the USA too.

shade-tree
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Re: Memorable Documentaries: Bill Cunningham New york

Post by shade-tree »

Bill Cunningham New York is a documentary about the photographer who died today at 87. He took fashion photos of regular people on the street and the rich and famous. Was never mean. Refused to become beholden to big money. Only means of transport was to ride a bicycle-- in Manhattan. His is A very inspiring frugal story.

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Ego
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Re: Memorable Documentaries: Bill Cunningham New york

Post by Ego »

shade-tree wrote:Bill Cunningham New York is a documentary about the photographer who died today at 87. He took fashion photos of regular people on the street and the rich and famous. Was never mean. Refused to become beholden to big money. Only means of transport was to ride a bicycle-- in Manhattan. His is A very inspiring frugal story.
+1

From his obit.

He didn’t go to the movies. He didn’t own a television. He ate breakfast nearly every day at the Stage Star Deli on West 55th Street, where a cup of coffee and a sausage, egg and cheese could be had, until very recently, for under $3. He lived until 2010 in a studio above Carnegie Hall amid rows and rows of file cabinets, where he kept all of his negatives. He slept on a single-size cot, showered in a shared bathroom and, when he was asked why he spent years ripping up checks from magazines like Details (which he helped Annie Flanders launch in 1982), said: “Money’s the cheapest thing. Liberty and freedom is the most expensive.”

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