Best car for ERE

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Scott 2
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Scott 2 »

The big groups are frustrating because I'm not the type of driver to pass unsafely or dive into the middle of the pack with my car.

I am well aware of the drivers that act crazy around bikers. In areas where I know bikers are heavy, I am extra careful going over hills and around curves. People do not think before they pass.

I'd rather bike a mile or two out of my way on trails than bike on these same roads. It does not look safe to me. It's essentially a pedestrian vs a tank driven by someone on a cell phone. No thanks

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Sclass
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Sclass »

Dragline wrote: I also love watching this guy, who also recommends buying older Toyotas because the engines and transmissions work forever. Here he his telling you why NOT to buy an older hybrid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYpIjnBGL-E

BTW, I still own a '63 Ford Ranchero and a '48 Plymouth that I need to get rid of if you're interested. ;)
I love Scotty Kilmer. I had a Celica like his and it was pretty good. I think the climate controller in the car broke but I repaired it with a soldering iron. The rotors warped. Valve stem seals leaked at 120k. Overall Toyotas live up to their reputation. There were a few Camrys after 98 that had issues

As for older cars, I've owned a lot of them. Most of my dating was done with a Volvo...but at the time having any car made me look good. I had a few old Mercedes that just get smirks from people of both sexes. While some cars didn't depreciate much, it was pretty rare to get one that went up in value. After looking at Mercedes 190sl convertibles go from $5k to $50k over the last thirty years I can say some go up. Porsche 356s were pretty good too. That's about 6% a year not including upkeep/restoration. After wrenching on old cars and trading them I'd say it is better to get one that some old bastard poured his money and work into. They never get their money out. I am happy to say I invested in other things. I figure a 300sl gull wing will be in reach before they take my license.

A Triumph? Please. You better be a good mechanic. I wouldn't touch a British car. Or bike. I helped too many friends on their Triumphs, MGs, Healys, BSAs and Nortons to ever want one. Too little engineering, too much cardboard. Does Lucas electronics ring a bell? Gag.

I like a Civic these days. Better get one a few years old. The big cost is depreciation.

So I guess it is up to people how much they want to wrench. I love doing it but something like a new Honda Fit might be the ERE ticket for some folks here. Focus on what you're good at.

I love my Mercedes cars but they are not for everyone.

Dragline
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Dragline »

Old Scotty is pretty harsh on the Mercedes, but I think he's just talking about the more recent ones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8B0nI8At_T0

The comments to this are pretty amusing.

The Old Man
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by The Old Man »

Car? I use the train.

As far as dates, they meet me at our destination. I tell them to use the valet. I think they like the idea of the valet - it makes them feel special. It costs me $5 or so - sometimes free. Way cheaper than a car. If a car is truly necessary, then it is rented. This approach is way cheaper than owning.

OldPro
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by OldPro »

I used to be into bicycling pretty seriously when I was younger. Riding a 'century' on a Sunday or taking a 2 week bicycle touring vacation around Scotland for example. Fair to say I biked a lot. But trust me, when you reach 69 as I have, the 'fun' starts to wear a bit thin. I still own a bike but have to confess I haven't been on it more than once or twice in a year in the last 5 or so years.

My pet peeve re bikes (and remembering I am a long term pro-bike person) is the senior citizens, who live in the small town where I now live, who ride their bicycles on the sidewalk. Not only is it illegal, it is dangerous to pedestrians. If they aren't confident enough to ride on the road where they belong, they shouldn't be riding at all.

It seems like there is a whole segment of seniors who embrace 'green' and 'exercise' in retirement and who see bicycles as part of that but without actually being very good at riding them. Look around your town, they ride upright bikes, often retro looking and wobble all over the place.
http://photos2.demandstudios.com/dm-res ... ep_ratio=1

Mind you, some of them aren't much better at driving cars either. LOL

DSKla
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by DSKla »

I've been wanting a bike, but I'm not sure I can survive to the "seasoned" stage in my city. The motorists here are some of the worst human beings on the planet. My buddy is very seasoned (200 mile rides for fun seasoned) and he's been nailed. Luckily he wasn't seriously hurt. I know it's just an anecdote, but between my lack of faith in my own abilities and in other people's, I haven't yet pulled the trigger on a two-wheeler. I'm 90% bus/walk at this point.

Gilberto de Piento
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Gilberto de Piento »

I agree that the best way is to design your life so you don't need a car in the first place.

If you do choose to have a car I like buying 10 year old grandma cars with low miles. They are past the rapid depreciation but are not so old or used up that they are unreliable or require many repairs. This isn't the only path but it works for me.

Cars like this can be hard to find but they are available if you are patient, careful and not too picky about the model, color or options. Use craigslist. I try to find a car with less than 70,000 miles for less than $7,000 dollars. Ideally you should try to find a Toyota or Honda but I'd rather have a 50,000 mile Ford than a 100,000 mile Toyota if all else is equal.

For example: Around 2005 I bought a car with 65,000 miles for $5000. I kept it for 5 years, put an additional $1000 or so into it, and drove it for 75,000 miles. I then sold it for $1700 dollars even though it had some body damage from a crash and other problems. $5000 + $1000 = $6000 - $1700 =$4300 / 5 = $860 per year.

Tyler9000
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Tyler9000 »

There are a few ways to consider this question. A lot depends on your situation and goals.

If your primary concern is commuting, then bikes, public transportation, or a very fuel-efficient car are generally the way to go financially. There's plenty of advice out there to that effect. Of course, there's also the ERE subset that lives in their vehicle and they will have very different needs. It's also very possible that the mode of transportation that works best for you pre-ERE is different from the one that suits you best in retirement.

Now that I'm retired, commuting costs are no longer my primary concern. Believe it or not, right now I'm really appreciating my 2009 Toyota Rav4. The relatively lesser gas mileage (although still quite good for it's class) doesn't really affect me while the space, comfort, reliability, and value are all quite nice for how I use it these days. My sedan is far more likely to be sold soon because it doesn't fit my new lifestyle that values getting the mulch home for my mid-afternoon gardening, scoring an inexpensive washing machine on Craigslist, or taking a nap in the back on an extended road trip.

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Sclass
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Sclass »

Dragline wrote:Old Scotty is pretty harsh on the Mercedes, but I think he's just talking about the more recent ones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8B0nI8At_T0

The comments to this are pretty amusing.
I've seen that video and the man doesn't lie. I don't want that car either! :lol:
He's funny.

There isn't a Benz made after 87 I'll buy. I probably won't be needing a new car anyway now that I repoed my moms car back from the caregiver. I learned how to do it from Reponut on YouTube.
Tyler9000 wrote:There are a few ways to consider this question. A lot depends on your situation and goals.
....
Now likely to be sold soon because it doesn't fit my new lifestyle that values getting the mulch home for my mid-afternoon gardening, scoring an inexpensive washing machine on Craigslist, or taking a nap in the back on an extended road trip.
No kidding Tyler, a cheap WD set can save a lot of gas $$$.

tylerrr
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by tylerrr »

I bought a 4 door, 2009 Toyota Yaris about 5 years ago for 10k$ in cash slightly used. It's been great, no major problems. I don't even have power locks...Just manual locks and manual window rollers...:)

It's got 72k miles and running strong. I change oil every 3k miles.

I've thought about getting rid of it and going carless, but I have no car payment and insurance/gas is so cheap I just keep it. It's nice to have around. I'm thinking of storing my folding bike in the trunk at my new apartment so when I leave my apartment most days I'll just open the trunk, grab my folding bike and off I go....

Von Paulus
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Von Paulus »

Small is beautiful!

Ford KA version II Cool and Sound,nice two door with airco and Ford stereo.
Engine by Fiat 69 HP.
Comfortable and easy going,also on the highway.
Frontseats well shaped.
Maintenance and petrolcosts minimal.

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Ego
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Ego »

Hands down winner for ERE car, the Peel P50

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJfSS0ZXYdo

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jennypenny
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by jennypenny »

Nah, you're thinking of this all wrong. If you aren't going to own a car you can also live in (like C40's van), the next best option is something all-purpose like this. Definitely BIFL. :D


Image

Tyler9000
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Tyler9000 »

Magnificent!

Kriegsspiel
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by Kriegsspiel »

Original ad:
I am in need of a reliable and SAFE driver to take my 10-year-old daughter home from after-school soccer practice starting in September and ending in late November. She needs to be taken from school in Exton to home in Bryn Mawr. It should take about an hour each day. You will be needed Mon, Tues, Thurs, and Fri. Looking for a safe driver with a clean driving record. E-mail at ***********@comcast.net with references. We can discuss compensation. Thanks!

From Me to ************@comcast.net

Good afternoon.

My name is Mike Partlow and I am very interested in this job. I have a lot of experience driving under dangerous conditions and guarantee your daughter will arrive safely at home every day.

If you are still looking for a dependable driver, please write back.

Sincerely,

Mike Partlow

From Kate ******** to Me

Mr. Partlow (can I call you Mike?),

I still am looking for a driver. Good to know you can handle dangerous conditions...but there probably will not be any dangerous conditions; you are just taking my daughter down Rt 3.

Tell me about yourself - are you a professional driver? Do you have any references from past jobs? What kind of car do you own? Is it reliable?

- Kate

From Me to Kate ********

Kate,

You can call me Mike. I was never one for formalities.

A little about myself, I am 37 years old, and worked as a mercenary driver in the Middle East. I have escorted important clients through high-risk areas in Iraq and Afghanistan for five years. I have seen a lot of action, and have ensured the safety of my clients. Out of all the jobs I have done, 90% of my clients arrived at their destination unharmed.

I have several references. I'll have one of them e-mail you.

My car is very safe and reliable - perfect for your daughter. It is an armored 2007 Chevy Suburban. All glass has been replaced with multi-layered ballistic glass capable of stopping a 7.62 x 39 bullet dead in its tracks. The doors, roof, and floor have been reinforced with ballistic steel/composite that can withstand IED blasts and stop grenade fragmentation. This car has been put to the test and will always deliver.

Safety and protection is my #1 priority. The car is fully loaded with an HK416 assault rifle that fire under the toughest conditions. The roof has a 40mm MK-19 automatic grenade launcher turret installed. Hopefully we won't have to use it, but it is good to have. I can't tell you how many times I've had to return fire against an enemy APC. I assure you that nobody will mess with your daughter as I escort her home from soccer practice.

Now lets discuss pay. I have various security packages I offer, and for your daughter I recommend my medium package which will run you $200 an hour. I also have a minimal package which is only $125 an hour. It is entirely up to you.

Let me know,

Mike Partlow

From Kate ******** to Me

This has to be a joke. This isnt Bagdad, it's suburban PA...

Are you just being sarcastic? What do you really drive? I want to pay 30 bucks a day, tops.

From Me to Kate ********

Kate,

Safety/protection is no joke. For $30, you are likely to get some 17-year-old kid who just got his license and will drive your daughter in his unarmored Ford Focus. I've seen an IED blow a Ford Focus into thousands of pieces, none larger than a golf ball.

My security package is well worth the $200 per trip. We will pick your daughter up in a random Suburban. Four trucks will pull up, and she will get into a random one every day. This is so the enemy does not know which one to attack. The Suburban she is in will have an armed security detail of men I have worked with in Iraq. We know what we are doing. She will be escorted in our convoy down the highway at a high rate of speed to avoid stopping in "kill zones." All vehicles are equipped with an MIRT which is used to change the traffic lights to green so we will not have to slow down. Your daughter will arrive safely in your arms no later than 20 minutes from when she is extracted from the soccer field.

Please reconsider my offer. You can't put a price on your daughter's safety.

From Kate ******** to Me

Stop wasting my time. Don't e-mail me again.


(later, from another e-mail account)

From Nick Walken to Kate **********

Dear Kate,

I am an old client of Mike Partlow. He told me that you wanted a reference for a job you are considering him for. Let me start off by saying, you could not have made a finer choice. Mike is the best there is. He literally saved my life countless times in Iraq. Whatever you are using him for, you have made the right choice. You will be 100% safe.

When I think about my experience Mike, one time stands above the rest. Back in 2005, I was a contractor in Iraq and had hired Mike's security detail to escort me through Fallujah. Everything was going fine until our convoy was hit by an IED. I don't remember much, but next thing you know, I woke up in a Republican Guard prisoner camp with Mike. I thought we were goners. They took me and Mike into a hut, where there were at least eight armed soldiers placing bets. They were going to make Mike and I play Russian Roulette. Mike convinced a soldier to let him play with three bullets, instead of one, which I thought was crazy. Mike even put the gun to his head once and pulled the trigger. He started laughing, and the soldiers started laughing too. When they let their guard down, he immediately shot three of them in the head, grabbed one of their AKs, and gunned down the other five soldiers. I didn't think we would make it out of that one alive, but thanks to Mike's heroic actions, I am here today.

You cannot go wrong with Mike Partlow. He is the best of the best. One time he killed an entire truck of insurgents using just a fork from his salad. He makes do with what he has and will survive the worst of situations.

If you have any more questions about Mike, please don't hesitate to contact me. I owe the man my life.

Nick

From Kate ******** to Me

what in the hell...

tylerrr
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by tylerrr »

vexed87 wrote:
Ydobon wrote:I wouldn't feel comfortable cycling in my city, a lot of crazy drivers :shock:
Sorry to divert the discussion, but this is an important observation that needs challenging!

This seems to be a key excuse for lots of people when it comes to sticking with the car. It's fair to say safety and infrastructure for cyclist has a long way to go in many cities in order to encourage more out of their heated sofa's on wheels and on to a bike, but infrastructure only needs to be put in place to change people's perception of safety. A seasoned cyclist knows how to mix with the traffic and cares not for segregated lanes or fancy lines marked on the road, the only thing that needs to change is the attitudes of city planners and politicians that more cars and roads and lanes is the way forward. Instead new and existing roads need to be (re)designed to accommodate all forms of travel and not favor one over the other, i.e. 60mph limit roads as main route into urban areas.

Unless you are riding your bike on a motorway or wobbling/swerving around the road, the risks are massively overstated. You are more likely to be killed or seriously injured (KSI) in your car than on a bike, and that's even before you factor in the health benefits! Jacob did a really good job of dispelling the perceived risks, and dodgy stats behind the dangers and risks of cycling as a means of transport in the ERE book.

If you factor out:

the accidents involving children (highly unlikely to be taking care/following the highway code),
those that ride without lights/reflectors in the dark,
those that ride on the pavement and out into junctions where a car would not expect to see you,
those who ride the wrong way down the road with headphones on,
those drunks (idiots) on bikes...

well, the stats on cycling tell a different story to everyone's perceptions of cycling safety. I can guarantee that your town is no more or less filled with crazy drivers than mine. Leeds is well renowned for being pro-car, it is by definition a motor city, in fact a motorway practically runs right down the middle of it, yet there has been a huge surge in cycling since the Tour de France rolled through town last summer. I think we are reaching critical mass, where cycling can no longer be ignored, and the ERE crowd need to be at the forefront of the change, as we all know, it starts from the bottom up!
I actually ride on the sidewalks all the time in Boston and consider myself an expert rider able to dodge and obstacle course about any urban environment. It is pure fun for me riding through the city. I know some people may not like it, but I'd rather break the law and fly down sidewalks half the time instead of dying.

But trust me, my head is on a swivel in Boston while biking around cars. I keep track of what is going on all around or else you'll probably end up severely injured or dead.

jacob
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by jacob »

Yeah, you're quite likely breaking the law riding a bike on the sidewalk. For example, in IL bikes are not allowed on the sidewalk for riders older than 12. Laws are similar in all the places I've checked (not Boston). This law, incidentally, does not seem to be heavily enforced. It only means that if you torpedo a pedestrian or a car, the liability is on you by default (insurance might not cover, you might get sued, etc.).

vexed87
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by vexed87 »

I implore any other commuter wannabes worried about riding on the road to consider the following. The implication of riding where a driver expects only to see pedestrians is that they are less likely to consider your presence when making decisions about entering or leaving a junction. Unlike pedestrians who move slowly, a pedestrian on a bicycle can cover ground much faster. Therefore despite a drivers best intentions to check for pedestrians before turning into or out of a junction, they are unlikely to take note of your approach. After all a cyclist could be perceived by a driver as a slow moving pedestrian at a glance/in periphery vision.

Yielding at every junction in the presence of any cars will go someway to making it safer. However to accomplish this, you will need to move at the same speed as a pedestrian. In an urban area, this could well make up 95% of your journey. Now reflect on why you are riding a bike at that speed in the first place, why not just walk? The main issue is deciding how would you differentiate between a driver passing the junction harmlessly therefore making it safe to cross vs a reckless driver who turns into or out of a junction at speed without warning or indicating? If you were to ride slowly/wait at every busy junction in a built up area due to the presence of cars, you will be spending most of your ride stationary. The reality of riding on the road is much safer than it is perceived. Being struck from behind is much much much less likely than being struck at a junction by driver not paying attention to their surroundings. After all, why would a driver expect a pedestrian to move towards a crossing at 15-20 mph?

By riding on the footpath, you are breaking the law (in most places!) and the law is there for a good reason (I assume for the reasons stated above), therefore you shouldn't be doing it. In my opinion the biggest problem with riding on the path is that you are one less cyclist on the road. The more cyclists there are on the road, the more likely that drivers will come to respect their two wheeled counterparts as having a place on the road, safety in numbers so to speak, the more cyclists there are on the roads, the more others will be encouraged to give it a try. Eventually, each city hits critical mass and the infrastructure HAS to change. Cyclists in cities have it much better than those in rural areas, the speed limits make it safer and the population density means that there are simply more of them about. Yet, for some reason, due to a mixture of prejudice and anecdotal evidence about some guy who got knocked of his bike in the road (no lights, while drunk, wearing headphones, at night) it's no longer safe to ride in the city streets!!! :evil:

Confidence of riding on the road is hard to achieve if you are naturally an anxious type, this is ok, this is your survival instinct. Only, the survival instinct can make you do dumb stuff, like indefinitely ride on the footpath. Spend enough time riding on the city streets, perhaps casually at first outside of peak traffic, and you will soon become accustomed to riding on the road. Confident cyclists riding in the correct position on the road are far safer than those bombing about on a footpath.

P.S. Tylerrr, this isn't a dig at you and your preference, just a plea to others to think about what might at first seem like a safer place to ride, not nearly as safe as you might expect. I see the local yokels riding their BSOs on pavements, jumping lights and riding erratically, these are the people that get KSI'd on a regular basis. While I doubt this is you, and I am sure you take every precaution, normalising riding on a footpath is wrong (IMO).

jacob
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by jacob »

If not willing to take the insurance, etc. risk of riding on the sidewalk, definitely get off of the bike and walk all the road crossings at the junctions. Not that anyone does this(*) ... but not doing it is just asking to get hit eventually. Aside from the public interest of not breaking the law and annoying other road/sidewalk users, my main fear would be insurance and liability. E.g. suppose some car clown wasn't looking as he ran you over at the corner of a junction (see below) and broke your ankle can you afford to pay for your ankle cast ($15000) and the body work on his Lexus ($2000) out of pocket because the insurance refuses to cover?

The [accident] risks of riding on the sidewalk (as it relates to cars) is that drivers aren't looking where/when they aren't expecting to see anything!

(Bikes coming out of the side walk, bikes riding in the wrong side of the street, and also bikes riding legally but much faster than the average cyclist---something that road bikers need to worry about).

I can't possibly emphasize how important that is.

For sidewalk riders, the most common problem are drivers that come up to the road to turn without stopping at the sidewalk when the sidewalk is recessed behind a few feet of grassy curb (common in the US). Practically all drivers will do this. If they see me, as a pedestrian---which I'm not really counting on since many of them aren't looking at me even as I'm looking at them---about 50% of them will stop in front of the sidewalk as they should behind the stop line on the road. The rest don't care.

The second most common problem are cars turning to the right while watching traffic to the left looking for an opportunity to pull in and completely ignoring anything from the right because they expect neither pedestrians nor cyclists on the sidewalk. That one happens regularly to me as a walker. Being on foot I can slap the hood to get their attention while jumping out of the way. On a bike, I couldn't get out of the way. (Hard to ride sideways or jump out of the way while sitting on a bike).

The biggest problem for anyone crazy enough to ride on the wrong side of the street is a) drivers aren't expecting cyclists to be there; b) meeting another cyclist going down the correct side---then what?!; and c) that damage is awarded based on the square of difference in speeds when riding along traffic but by the square of the sum when riding against it. This turns an otherwise survivable crash with a few bruises into pulp fiction and an opportunity to donate some organs. Also reaction times are shortened significantly.

For road bikers who follow the rules of traffic, my advice would be to look fast whenever you go fast. If you're doing 20mph in your uprights, drivers will think you're cruising at 10mph and think they have enough time to pull out in front of you---which is not the case. So whenever you see a car coming out from a side street, get down in your drops so that drivers associate you with speed and get your hands on the brakes.

(*) In my hood I'd say about 70% of all cyclists are riding on the sidewalk. About 20% are riding correctly. And about 10% are riding against traffic.

Overall, basically the problem in the US is that it's a car centric culture where bikes for the most parts are seen as toys. When kids grow up in the suburbs they learn to ride on the sidewalks... then when they get old enough to buy a car they stop riding bikes. Consequentially, if they get on a bike as adults they have all the experience, knowledge, and expectations of cycling as a 10 year old kid from the burbs. I believe this is the main reason for all this risky behaviour. This knowledge extends to enforcement too. I've heard more than one cyclist story about being stopped by the police and being told that riding on the street is illegal and to get back on the sidewalk. Oh well ...

henrik
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Re: Best car for ERE

Post by henrik »

I would add the danger of getting hit by a car pulling out of a gate or a yard. They also generally don't expect anything moving faster than a pedestrian.

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