Ex-lawyer

Say hello!!
Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Wed Apr 22, 2015 8:53 am

My mood has improved considerably with the weather and the completion of the cottage purchase. We have been working hard at the renos, and dealing with Irish tradesmen (I fear that many of the competent ones are working in the mines of Australia or in Dublin).

We have been made very welcome in our village. I have trouble understanding the older men when the speak among themselves, but that is part of the charm.

My parents have decided to visit in two weeks from Oz. Hopefully the house will be more liveable by then. It will be fun either way.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Sun Apr 26, 2015 12:56 am

We met older people on the road in Australia who went from one house to another. They paid for access to an Australian house sitting site, but claimed there were more houses than applicants. The only downside, they said, was getting attached the animals and having to leave them. They also noted that their friends who didn't live on the road all seemed to be getting older..... It was also amusing to hear from grandparents on the road and get their perspective on grandkids from one adult to another. As grandkids you think it's all about you. At least for these oldies on wheels, it was all about them.....

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Thu Jul 09, 2015 5:22 am

The cottage is now done up. It is much better than either of us could have imagined. Keep the faith if you find yourself it the same boat. We got in several Irish tradesmen to assist. The quality, generally, was much, much lower than we would find in Australia, but the price was much cheaper. The plumber was criminally incompetent, but we worked through all of that and now have a snug, european cottage.

My parents visited. They stayed for 2 months (we slept in the attic as the place is so small). That did my fucking head in at first, as it did my wife, but in the end they relaxed a bit and we got used to it. We spent 3 weeks in France with them, which I really enjoyed - one of the benefits of having a European base.

Summer in Ireland is completely different to winter. In winter the whole place shuts down pretty much, and with good reason. It is dark, cold and wet. Days are extremely short. We found it quite depressing, especially with the long conveyance and no guarantee of success (due to Irish law). It could well have been a failed, expensive experiment.

Thankfully, it wasn't.

I expect this winter to be much more pleasant, safe in our shiny cottage. We still hope to housesit for fun and adventure.

As I mentioned elsewhere, the prospect of being resident here for 3 years and nabbing an Irish passport seems more of a possibility.

Next steps: working on health and fitness (took a dive in the Irish winter post Oz trip), and, put some fun, money making schemes on the slow boil to try and increase and diversify income.

PS - I might mention Ireland has an extremely strong second hard market. You would be mad to buy many things new. Almost all of our home, including our kitchen, is second hand. So many people are leaving here, there is a bargain a minute. The old idea that you double your spending power you double your income really becomes apparent. An example, an Ikea desk was picked up last week for 10 Euro. How much new? I don't know, but more than that. It's like an income multiplier, except dead simple to implement.

Hankaroundtheworld
Posts: 454
Joined: Mon Feb 24, 2014 4:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Hankaroundtheworld » Thu Jul 16, 2015 6:05 am

Hi, just read it all, and I am a bit surprised why you choose Ireland without checking on tax and living conditions (and related costs), but perhaps there is an emotional reason to be there regardless what the situation. Good thing, human beings always will find a way to turn a challenging situation into something liveable, so all the best for your journey in Ireland (it is indeed a beautiful country).

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Thu Jul 16, 2015 5:54 pm

Hi Hank. The plan was really to park some modest equity there from an overpriced Oz property market and buy a whole cottage in Europe. Ireland was attractive because the wife had a passport mainly but they also speak English (makes it easier to do something like buy a house). Their property market is also shot. I have never committed to staying, so the fact I have stayed shows I'm still having fun.

Re the tax etc. I guess I'm not a little bookworm at home calculating everything. I'm on a wild, mad adventure with my wife and to some extent we threw caution to the wind in doing this. It could have easily have failed. But if the house evaporated in a puff of smoke we would just get on with it so we didn't have everything on the line.

And it seems to have worked out.

We went to Cork today, which I really enjoyed.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Thu Jul 16, 2015 5:57 pm

PS - Your planning suggestions certainly would have been logical. But it wouldn't have affect my decision.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Fri Sep 18, 2015 10:29 am

We have started the housesitting. The first one was a hoot. 11 nights for free in a desirable part of Ireland. It was like a holiday from a holiday. We have 4 others lined up in 3 countries before the end of Jan, including a month in France and a few weeks on 2 islands off Ireland.

Financially I wouldn't mind topping things up a bit. We have taken a hit with the exchange rate. And I do get a sense we are going backwards somewhat (some unexpected tenant costs). If we spent more time in a computer and less time exploring the country then we would spend less on fuel, but that isn't going to happen I don't think. The housesitting at least allows us to stay in the same spot and explore locally rather than driving long distances often.

In terms of increasing the cash I'm not sure exactly what to do. I'm aware of all of the options, including the preferred commercialisation of an existing interest, preferably in a passive or automated manner. Easier said than done.

Foodwise we have concluded we get the best bang for our buck cooking Indian style meals with dried pulses etc at work along with meat curries and veges.

Mentally summer was much better than winter. Bit of a mind-f*** for someone from a warm climate. I'm hoping this winter will be better than the last as we have bought and renoed the cottage so that stress isn't there.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Sat Jan 16, 2016 2:33 am

We have spent the past 4 months housesitting all over the country. I think we have have stayed in 8 places: 2 islands off Ireland, athlone, belfast (twice), dublin, wicklow, kinsale - I think. For those who enjoy slow travel, and are FI or have location independent gigs, I cannot recommend it enough. We have loved - and that isn't too strong a word, every single sit. We relished going to new locations and exploring the local (natural and historical) sites. We fell for pets. We enjoyed meeting locals and hearing their views of the world. We have shared meals and the odd glass, and it has been a whole lot of fun altogether.

Today we drive for France, via a 17 hour ferry, where we will stay for 5 weeks. We are looking after Alpacas, as I've mentioned elsewhere. The English couple are expecting us and are preparing us a duck. It will be hugely exciting. And of course the accommodation is free - you just have to look after the house and pets.

Between sits we return to the cottage. It is almost like a holiday from a holiday from a holiday, if you can process that. It's exciting to return home, and keeps it fresh.

We have almost fixed the damp in the bedroom (the cottage is stone, and there was a broken downpipe). Rather than buying a dehumidifier, I posted to the Facebook free things/sale group and I got offered 2 for free. Someone also offered one down the pub when I mentioned it. A bloke even offered to plaster the walls for us as a helping hand!!!! (Which he did!!) Note I didn't beg, I just said hey we had a damp wall and would anyone be so kind as to lend us a dehumidifier. People want to be kind, I think.

We give back by giving away stuff we don't want (as much as possible, is my view). I have also been asked by a respected fellow down the pub to join a small group of 3 in the parish that helps out people who need a hand. It isn't religious or for publicity, but if someone is in the shit and needs say a ramp built they will try and work out how to raise the money to build it, just on the quiet. I've never done anything like that before but it sounds like a good thing to do so I'm going to take him up on that when I get back from France.

My wife continues to obtain her wardrobe from charity stores. I think I read in Jacob's book that the best place to shop is a rich area, and how true it was in Wicklow, just south of Dublin. Wonderful as new clothes for free basically. What a hoot.

I don't seem to need a wardrobe.

(As a side, we have really noticed that if we want something, and say no, let's not buy it just now, then within months it seems to become available for free or at a very low cost. This may not work for houses, but it sure does for smaller things).

I have been sniffing around for part time remote gig. Not the most attractive for employers granted, which I guess is why I am still largely unemployed. But I can set my terms (and again, wait) thanks to the way we are structured. I think finally something fantastic may have come along, helping an old client negotiate some agreements in Europe. Anyway, the main thing for me is that I'm excited by it, will boost the coffers, and won't involve an office or a full time gig. Strictly it will be half time, but I think I'm 2-3 times more efficient than they think so it will be much less than that with a half time salary. I won't be misleading anyone as there are no timesheets, just helping out.

We aim to invest 100% of the post tax salary, although it will also operate as a safety net as we don't have much cash on hand, and our investment is a house basically, and we live in another. I've an idea to split our investment home into two - we could rent the other out or live in it (rental from two would be more than rental from a larger one I think). It would basically be a small self contained area within the larger house. This would cost cash we don't have so that would be handy.

Anyway that gig isn't locked in. I think I will find out next week. I've a call scheduled from France!

I'm still helping out an old mate for 400 bucks a month. That is no drama at all, and almost no time. I enjoy it.

The much feared winter has been a pussycat, although a little wet (jeeze that doesn't sound right). It may well be mild or whatnot, but we are really enjoying living here even during this time. That is a great relief and increases our longer term options.

This year will be more of the same with the housesitting, although hopefully supplemented by the part time gig (which, I might add comes with a strict no-dickhead policy). It is initially for 3 months, but if it ends then well that's fine.

thrifty++
Posts: 645
Joined: Sat May 23, 2015 3:46 pm

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by thrifty++ » Sat Jan 16, 2016 2:54 am

Sounds like your having an awesome time! Would love to do house sits.
You mentioned that you are needing some cash from your part time job. I also don't quite understand your financial position when you left your job from your first post. Was it a $500k house plus $40k leftover or was it you sold the house and had $40k remaining in total?

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Sat Jan 16, 2016 3:12 am

@thrifty We own a house in Oz worth A$600k or so I would say. We rent it out for A$550 a week. We own an Irish cottage worth maybe 80k EURO, which we live in. I get A$400 a month from helping a mate in Oz (very little, enjoy it). Maybe US$200 or so a month from book royalties. I'm hoping the part time remote gig will bring in A$100k PA (3 month gig initially) although that is not locked in. We hope to invest that money rather than spend it. That's it. Full disclosure. We also have maybe A$170k or so in forced retirement funds (superannuation it's called).

thrifty++
Posts: 645
Joined: Sat May 23, 2015 3:46 pm

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by thrifty++ » Sat Jan 16, 2016 3:16 am

lol full disclosure. Was worried you skipped with $40k and were hanging out for cash. ;) Sounds like you are right then. Nice work on getting a few random income streams. Must add to the feeling of independence.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Sat Jan 16, 2016 3:46 am

yeah i love the idea of a few random income streams. then at any given point you can suffer a loss, or tell someone to go f&&k themselves without consequence. anyway, must pack.

enigmaT120
Posts: 907
Joined: Thu Feb 12, 2015 2:14 pm
Location: Falls City, OR

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by enigmaT120 » Mon Jan 18, 2016 1:21 pm

I like the idea of house sitting, but it would obviously have to wait until after I retire.

One year I tracked the weather in Ireland (Dublin, I think) to compare it with the weather here in Western Oregon. Ireland actually had a nicer winter, with more sunshine, than I did here that year. But when summer came Ireland's weather didn't change all that much! I do love our summers here. Where I live I get over 80 inches of rain a year. Oh well, my Douglas-fir trees like it.

thrifty++
Posts: 645
Joined: Sat May 23, 2015 3:46 pm

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by thrifty++ » Mon Jan 18, 2016 11:12 pm

I love oregon. For me it was the most beautiful place I visited in the US. Loved all the green everywhere. Very cosey.

Did - not sure if your already onto this but another thing I would love to do if I wasn't working was make my way around by delivering cars for free. So I have a luxury transport experience with no cost.Free petrol even. A free way to get between your house sitting locations. Not sure how common it is in Europe but you will probably know that there are loads of such gigs in NZ and Aus.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Tue Jan 19, 2016 1:15 am

@thrifty nice idea but I do think it might be hard to like up with the sits. These days I think it's the accomidation that's the killer expense.

Edit: line up the sits
Last edited by Did on Tue Apr 26, 2016 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Tue Apr 26, 2016 1:47 am

France is but a memory now. We had a fabulous time over 5 weeks. Sometimes I have to remind myself that spending over a month in France would have been a dream when I worked full time in Australia. I know a rich man who used to take his whole family to France for a month every year or two and spend A$20k a pop.

He is worth about 5 million bucks and is still working full time in a stressful job (law partner).

The old bitch gave us a terrible review on the housesitting site. When you are living as we do with lots of housesitting you need to have a thick skin for this sort of thing. Of course we do not and it really shit us. We have moved on though, and at the end of the day we got a month of free luxury accommodation in return for a slight ego hit.

We have had a little housesit fatigue back in Ireland. It's a great concept, but we are booked until the end of June, and at that point we will have been sitting pretty much for 11 months. I had a goal to be able to snare sits at will when I started, and I can say we have done that. It's in the toolbox. People write to us now and ask because of (largely) good reviews. Please stay in our home for free they say. No we often say, because we are booked and are back to the cottage from July to host guests and also consider our next move.

We are on our third sit since France. One of the sits was at Howth Head, which is where millionaires live in Dublin (well, one of the spots). We are now living in rural Clare in a house two old hippies built. I tell you what, I can see the benefit of lifetime renting but the 4k pounds these guys spent in 1991 to buy these 4 acres was well spent. The house is lovely and guess what they can live in it for decades and built up their hippy lives growing food and being chilled and not paying any rent. He said that he is the only fellow from his youth that owns property (he would be in his 60s I would say). Buying was a big win for them, and I think for many people in the long, long term.

One of my tasks is to water 8 extremely suspicious plants.

DW has scored herself an online gig using Upworks - the new elance. I wanted to point this out because a lot of the stuff we do a lot of people say to do but I don't know anyone who actually does (our age anyway). Quit jobs (at earning peak) sell houses and travel Oz in an RV. Sell investment home and use modest equity to buy cheap cottage in Europe. And now, do a little online contracting to pad out the income. It is all possible and not just in theory.

It's interesting how much a little work does pad out the income. Seeing how wealthy a lot of the online escape crowd is - I mean really wealthy (millionaires) with massive incomes - I can't really relate. We are really ERE territory and need to use our brains to survive. Anyway there is not a lot left over and we are basically spending just a little more than we earn (thanks to things like living in Ireland to get a passport, doing up a cottage, travelling all over the place and so on). But our cost base is low and I do not want for anything, which, as Thoreau said, is my greatest skill. So this modest half time remote gig will increase our income by two thirds, and almost all of it will be cream as our costs are covered and I don't really want to buy anything.

It will however reduce our anxiety and save for future costs such as more flights around the place (back home for example, it's been a year and a half away), or perhaps renovating the investment home back home to allow for a small separate living space which might come in handy for us later on while still renting out the bulk of the house.

We always planned on increasing our income somehow. I had applied for part time remote legal work - setting my own terms. As it turns out, the big boys weren't interested on those terms but being FIRE of a sorts that was fine by me which is the point. Initially I had thought I would get some sort of muse going - like Mr MM's 400K a year return on his blog, but I think that's fantasy stuff for most of us and as it turns out I enjoy poking around exploring and hanging out with DW than engaging in Tim Ferris style carry on with a low probability of success.

It may be that with the misses working a little I will make an effort to increase my income just as an exercise. Like the housesitting, or the cottage or the RV living - can I do it? Will I enjoy it? Happy to try few things to see if I do. But if anything shits me it is gone, which as I said is the point.

I've been motivated by the gardens I have seen and we have seeds down to get food growing. We are collecting windows to build a greenhouse. I've also invested in a wine making kit and gear so I need to get brewing and drinking to recoup those costs. I will report separately on that but I want to try making wine 3 ways: the kit, using a fruit juice bottle (the 1 minute wine), and making country wine/jail hooch. Fuck paying Irish prices for wine - almost all of it is tax.

We have listed the cottage on AirBNB and have had 3 takers so far! That is gratifying as it was not habitable when we moved in a year ago. None have come yet so that will be interesting - the thick skin may have to come into play. If we get much interest we might look at continuing the Irish sitting so as to collect money from the house.

Pretty pleased with how things are coming along.

thrifty++
Posts: 645
Joined: Sat May 23, 2015 3:46 pm

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by thrifty++ » Tue Apr 26, 2016 4:04 am

Wow sure sounds like your having an awesome time.

What was it that "the old bitch" complained about? Seems a little bit random.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Tue Apr 26, 2016 11:15 am

She gave us three stars. Every other review is 5. Some sweeping generalisations mainly. She didn't enjoy her holiday in Australia, didn't like the beaches, her own family didn't want to see her. I can see why....

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Tue Jun 07, 2016 1:22 am

Summer in Ireland is a delight. We have continued our sitting, mother in law in tow, and as luck would have it now find ourselves looking after a pet free mansion near one of Ireland's popular beach destinations - Tramore. Before this we were in another delightful town called Westport.

Between sits I joined a local home brew club. They have their own gear and meet up monthly to put on an all grain full mash brew and share skills. I've even volunteered to help out with the craft beer festival that is coming up in our local town next month. All of this is good for the social side of things as well as skill levels as it's easy to get a little isolated post FIRE if you are not careful.

I brought my fermenter on this sit so I'm going to put on my first wine kit today. Should it work it will reduce the cost of a bottle of wine from at least 4 euro to 1.20, which isn't a bad multiplier. I also intend on doing a version of the 1 minute wine, as well as country wines in due course. As well as beer.

Our life has changed a little with DW working away with the freelancing. She has been promoted and given a modest payrise in the first few weeks, but it looks as though this will come with an increased expectation of hours. We could do with the cash though, to be honest, given our lifestyle. If we plunked in the one spot our expenses would be lower, but we do like exploring and having a bit stashed away. It isn't like normal work though, in that it is remote and in a sense optional in that she could shut her computer and block her boss and the sky would't fall due to the way we are set up.

We intend on sitting less after our next sit in Belfast, and so I will be able to spend more time reducing costs with brewing etc (ha). We will continue to refine our efficiencies and reduce dependencies over time. I planted a few fruit trees and we are encouraging seedlings to grow as well....

DW's sister continues to serve as a reminder of what a catastrophic fuckup is. She's been unemployed for years (mid 30s). She was on the dole, then on a bullshit business grant (zero revenue in 3 years?), and is now looking at a 3 year part time, dole extending dietitians course even though she is as fat as a house and smokes like a chimney (and drinks like a fish). She is a no-good bludger, no more. I can't stand her, and I think the feeling is mutual.

She offered to pay for a night out in Dublin the other day. We would never spend money like that. How can she? Well, she dips into her trusting aunt's account every few weeks to top off her dole. We see that as we swap aussie dollars for euros out of it with similar frequency. If we aren't quick enough old sticky fingers, as I call her, empties it out.

We don't like seeing her but with the MIL around had her over last week. She rewarded us by drinking to excess and spewing in our bed. What a fucking disgrace.

Speaking of the cottage, we had our first AirBNB sit the other night. Proud moment for us as it was far from rentable when we bought it. Nice to get paid when housesitting, but I did find the cleaning a huge pain the arse and we did drive back to show them around which was also a bit of effort. I don't think AirBNB is really part of our future although we do have 2 more bookings before we scale back the housesitting.

That's all the news for now.

ps here's an email I sent my family and friends:

Did I tell you about the time I met the President of Ireland? We were at a 1916 commemoration in the beautiful town of Westport, Co. Mayo. I had heard that the President was coming the night before when at Matt Malloy's drinking a pint. Matt is the flue player for the Chieftains, and his pub is famous for open sessions where traditional instruments are played in a very relaxed and intimate setting.

Anyway, following the barman's advice we were there and waiting for the big man at 12.30. Although he's actually a little man. Trite to say, but leprechaun looking. If you don't believe me then google him. The big coincidence was that the one Irish person we know in Australia who is from Westport claimed that her great uncle had a bust outside the Catholic church as he did great things in 1916, which is sort of like Irish royalty. It turns out she wasn't lying, and the President mentioned this fella - Major John MacBride - more than any other because not only had be fought in the Boer War against the British, but he was shot by the English in retribution for his 1916 antics.

President Higgins surprised us. He was a firebrand. Fists raised. Switching between Irish and English. It was very impressive. He must have given 30 of these speeches this year, being the centenary and all, but instead of generic tripe or slogans he spoke of local people and local issues and meant every word.

Afterwards we made our way to Hotel Westport, where our friend's relatives were having a drink. On arrival I could see a sign for a 1916 function, and deduced that it was an official function for the descendants of the heroes and wondered if we would be able to sneak in as civvies. Disguising ourselves with pints, we did just that. I suggested to DW we split up and mingle for 10 minutes, and immediately looked around for the President, who I suspected would have made a showing for this illustrious crowd.

There he was. Surrounded by fans, all clamouring for a picture. I just stood to one side and watched, making no effort to get any closer having given up queues (or even worse, a lack of them) long ago.

You're the smartest person in here, a young lady said, much, I must admit, to my surprise.

Why's that?, I replied with false modesty, while slicking my hair back a little out of habit.

You're just relaxing drinking a pint, she said.

Well, I replied, there's no chance of me getting in there, while gesturing to his excellence and fan club.

Would you like a picture? She said. Did I. Turns out she was some sort of Presidential organiser.

She motioned to a door to the left, and whispered to me like I was Jason Bourne.

Through there....

I shuffled through the door, wondering if she was having a lend of me as she followed.

Put your pint down, she commanded.

Do you have anyone to take the picture?

I didn't. So she motioned to the official photographer who had appeared out of nowhere to take my phone.

Where are you from?

Brisbane.

She nodded appreciatively, and I thought, shit, she thinks I'm a direct descendant of a 1916 Irish hero who has flown over for this function from Brisbane, and I'm surely about to get my arse kicked.

It was then the Guard (read big policeman) came around the corner and looked right at me.

Just him, she said.

He's from Brisbane.

The Guard nodded just as the President himself came through the door and looked at both of us.

Just him, said the Guard.

He's from Brisbane.

The President came over, and I shook his hand.

President, I said, and we posed for the picture.

He turned away, and fulled by pints and the moment, I slapped the little man on the back, causing his hair to wobble.

Great speech by the way, I said before making a swift departure so that my camera wouldn't be confiscated and me thrown in prison for making false pretences of the worst kind in this very proud little country.

And that was how I met the President of Ireland....

Thecoalminerswife
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Dec 21, 2015 11:39 pm
Location: Newcastle, Australia

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Thecoalminerswife » Mon Jun 13, 2016 6:52 pm

Thanks for your honest, inspiring story. I'd love to be taking the chances you and your wife have, but my husband is much more reluctant. We're also Australians, he's working in the mining industry - being flogged. I plan to sit him down to read your blog next weekend. Hopefully, he'll gain confidence.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Tue Jun 14, 2016 2:50 am

@cmw Thank you. Suggest you read Tim Ferrises fear setting exercise in the Four Hour work week. It helped me. Also put EVERYTHING on the table. If your husband had a heart attack and you had to stop work immediately what would you do? And if in the unlikely event it all turns to shit after a year of your new lifestyle, how hard would it be to return to the status quo? Ie get another nightmare job. Worst case is you have a well earned break. Let us know how you go and good luck.

Thecoalminerswife
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Dec 21, 2015 11:39 pm
Location: Newcastle, Australia

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Thecoalminerswife » Fri Jul 15, 2016 3:02 am

Hi again Ex-lawyer. Thanks for your suggestions. I'm still working on it!! We had a fun hour or two last weekend reading out your ere blog while the coalminer cooked dinner. We both enjoyed it very much but he was fearful that you might not cope (financially) if you decide to have children. Nevertheless, he was impressed by your courage. We've been talking more realistically about his work/life imbalance. He seems to be understanding it more - certainly his mentor has been in his ear, as well. We will continue on the way we are for the near future, being mindful of spending and inching our way to our financial target. I'm continuing to read and think about how the non-work future might look. I've been using "sabbatical" rather than "retirement" when talking to him about it - less intimidating, I think :)

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Sat Jul 16, 2016 3:51 am

Ha yes good idea. Good lingo. How about just a year off work then return? Can he get extended leave without pay but keep the job? How hard would it be to get another job in 12 months? Can he work part time?

As for me, fear not. Worst case for me I get a job! But it's been three years and I can assure you it has not come to that. My wife is enjoying her remote gig, which is in addition to our other income. I'm learning how to brew - that's my big project for the next six months. I may be repeating myself but we now only pay 1.10 Euro for a bottle of wine as we make it ourselves. Beats earning forty Aussie and paying half in tax then spending the rest on oyster bay.

As for kids, as I said I could get a job if I signed up to 20 years of child care and needed more cash as a result. But we have too much fun to consider doing that. The siblings have kids and we can annoy them with our stories when we are old and feeble.

User avatar
FBeyer
Posts: 679
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 3:25 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by FBeyer » Mon Jul 18, 2016 5:47 am

For what it's worth. I estimate that the cost of children when you're FI is about 10% of what it costs when you're still working. For toddlers and babies anyway.

Edit: not to be pushy at all. I know how some parents always come across as: Eeeeeerhmageerd you HAVE to have kids, it's the BEST!
Fuck that. I merely wanted to state that children cost a lot of money when you don't have the time to raise them yourself and when you're patching up your bad conscience about your absence by buying them toys and weekend entertainment.

Did
Posts: 612
Joined: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:50 am

Re: Ex-lawyer

Post by Did » Mon Jul 18, 2016 8:25 am

Thanks FB. I think if we did have kids - which we won't if we can help it - it would be more in my head than anything else. Ie I need to be responsible and all that crap.

Post Reply