ffj's early retirement

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ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj » Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:32 pm

@rigger
I tried jacking up portions of the house years ago with limited success. From what I can tell, the house settled decades ago, mainly because of subpar framing. The house won't be settling anymore because I took the necessary steps to keep it from doing so, mainly adequate support in the basement, especially around the opening for the steps. I also didn't want to crack my drywall throughout the house by trying to level it.

Yes, the ceiling also had to be leveled to match the floor, which I did by sistering 2 x 4's to the ceiling joists. It was out about 3/4 of an inch over 12 feet. Plus they were all wonky which is one of the main reasons I wanted to redo the room anyway. The ceiling looked awful before.

I'm not worried about the shingles because I didn't use that many. I used them to transition from a 1/2 inch drop to zero, and i used 1/2 inch plywood where I could to make up the height difference. All of this was covered by 3/4 inch advantech subfloor which I screwed down to the floor joists. If you look closely at the pictures a lot of this will be more clear. This was actually the easy way, and cheaper to boot. And I'm still a fireman. ;)

@Jason

Thanks....I think. :? ;)

The owl scared me pretty good. I still don't know how he got there.

Jason
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Jason » Thu Jul 13, 2017 7:46 am

You are welcome.

The wheelbarrow in the open doorway shot opening up into the expanding plains is like an homage to the famous doorframe shot that concluded John Ford's "The Searchers" which as also given homage at the end of The Godfather II when Kay looks through the doorframe as Michael is coronated.

Your "haul" seems to be the detritus of a junkie with a paranormal bent.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj » Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:44 am

O.K. I just read your journal and I understand your sense of humor now. You kind of threw me for a loop earlier to be honest, you know, with Satans butthole and everything. I don't read as many journals as I probably should because I don't want to see charts of how much toothpaste somebody uses per month. Haha, generalizing there, but I'm boring enough without having to know someones outlay for soap or dental floss. :lol: There are some great journals on here though and I'm just lightly kidding. It's all about the details.

Happy to have taken a good picture. I think I'll put your description of it underneath it and have it framed. haha

Jason
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Jason » Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:10 am

I'm not good with animals, let alone ones that are where they shouldn't be i.e. in my fucking shit. I once woke up to a mouse sitting in my car console looking at me like he just got a booty call from Minnie Mouse and I was his fucking chauffeur. I ran shrieking like to my wife who used the occasion to smoke out $300 from me to scare the thing out.

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Riggerjack
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack » Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:35 am

@ cm:

Usually, when a house settles, it is the foundation sinking. And everything sinks with it. The walls are the same height, they just start from an inch lower than others.

In older houses, walls were often just built on the foundation, not attached to j bolts or anything. These are easiest. Just get a beam, set it across the joists, and use posts and car jacks to raise it up, check for level, then shim. Multiple jacking points can make this a bit more difficult. I have seen some nice custom shims cut from PT lumber, or, if the gap is big enough, squeezing mortar in to fill it.

Older houses were often built post and pier, where you would have a series of small independent footings supporting posts, supporting beams, supporting joists. These commonly settle, and YouTube is surely full of videos about methods of correcting.

For reference, most cheap, autozone bottle jacks are rated for 2-3 tons. My 1464 sq house, when I moved it, (so without a chimney or front porch) weight approx 75,000 lbs. So sections could be moved with small jacks, or the whole thing by a few big jacks.

Roofing shingles are asphalt based, and all asphalt has a smell when new. Nothing super toxic, just the "new road smell". If you haven't noticed anything, I wouldn't give it another thought.
Last edited by Riggerjack on Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:56 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Riggerjack
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack » Thu Jul 13, 2017 9:51 am

Also, as walls settle, gravity fights sheer strength to distort the wall.

Jacking the floor back to level relieves this stress, taking the house back to the shape it was built as.

Now, if you were to lift high points, rather than low points, that could cause damage, but I can't think of a reason to do that intentionally.

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cmonkey
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by cmonkey » Thu Jul 13, 2017 12:08 pm

Yea that's how I did my jacking, boards across the joists with 6 foot tall adjustable floor jacks rated at 35,000 lb each. When I did my research all I could find were people talking about how it causes undo stress on the entire structure when you start jacking it up too far and that if you wanted to do major jacking it should be done over a year or two.

My own experience was that beyond a certain point I started hearing cracking and creaking that made me very nervous. I feared that I'd start busting studs and stuff. Nails popping out of the shingles ( a couple did actually).

Jason
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Jason » Thu Jul 13, 2017 1:03 pm

Man, that's some serious fuckin jacking you guys got going on.

George the original one
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by George the original one » Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:47 pm

I've seen more than one old Portland house jacked up far enough so a lower floor could be constructed, then the house dropped back down onto it. Lots of temporary cribbing underneath these while building the lower floor!

Not really clear to me why they choose to jack rather than raise the roof.

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Riggerjack
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by Riggerjack » Thu Jul 13, 2017 4:22 pm

If you lift a house, you only need to build walls, (cheap) and reconnect utilities. You can temp in most utilies in a day, so you can live in the house while work happens. If you add a level at the top, you have to move all your stuff, your house is vulnerable to weather, and you are out until they are done. Also, lifting works better with hills and most architecture.

But upstairs kitchens are a little different from the norm...

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj » Fri Jul 14, 2017 12:19 pm

Well, I thought my corn problems were over:

Image

This is a classic raccoon situation right here. I lost 10 ears of corn last night. I need another week to fully mature all of the crop and these bastards may not let me get there.

I set the trap out again and hopefully I'll catch the culprit tonight....we'll see.

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cmonkey
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by cmonkey » Fri Jul 14, 2017 3:46 pm

We went on a garden walk at a club member's home and they have short electric fences around all their gardens. Seems to work to keep even the coons out.

I've had a single coon climb over my 7 foot deer fence, but he was tempted by a birdhouse. I moved the birdhouse and so no more problems.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj » Fri Jul 14, 2017 7:48 pm

@monkey
We recently had our neighbors move who live next door and now we have a new family. Now, the old guy who used to live there loved to shoot things when he wasn't fishing so any critter that dared to come on his property, which surrounds my property, pretty much ended up dead. To his credit, he would eat almost everything he shot, and I never had a coon problem while he was still there. I'm thinking he controlled my pest problem without me realizing it.

The electric fence works. I just don't want to invest the money just yet. Hopefully I'll catch that dude tonight.

George the original one
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by George the original one » Sun Jul 16, 2017 12:01 pm

ffj wrote:
Fri Jul 14, 2017 7:48 pm
The electric fence works. I just don't want to invest the money just yet. Hopefully I'll catch that dude tonight.
Natural abhors a vacuum: there'll be a replacement next year, so you might as well get the fence this year.

ffj
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Re: ffj's early retirement

Post by ffj » Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:04 pm

@George
I've set the trap for two nights now and the first night he snagged one more ear of corn and managed to steal the bait from the trap without setting it off. :evil: The second night he didn't visit as far as I can tell. Maybe tonights the night.

You're right about the fencing in the long run; he won't be the last pest to come steal my hard labor. Speaking of pests, I've managed to catch at least 20,000 of those damn Japanese beetles. I'm sick of having to empty the trap! I'm really hoping I'm making a dent in next years crop of beetles, at least in my yard.

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