Garden Log

What skills to learn, what tools to get
rosecity80
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Re: Garden Log

Post by rosecity80 » Sun Aug 14, 2016 11:39 am

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Made risotto d'ete, or summer risotto, from carrots and beans from my garden! This year's winners have been zucchini, beans (bush and pole), blueberries, strawberries, kale, lettuce, swiss chard, french sorrel, green onions, cucumbers (marketmore), raspberries, tomatoes (stupice, chocolate cherry), and herbs. The losers have been heirloom tomatoes (covering the bushes, but still green) and melons (probably not sunny/hot enough). The jury is still out on the Lakota and sweet-meat winter squash, which are growing and gaining in size.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one » Wed Aug 17, 2016 4:55 pm

Going by the weather, you wouldn't know the seasons are shifting... however the peas are on their final blooms, the onion stalks are falling over, and the potatoes vines have all withered. Still 1.5-2 months until frost threat arrives. Time to plant for the winter garden!

rosecity80
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Re: Garden Log

Post by rosecity80 » Fri Aug 19, 2016 4:15 pm

George the original one wrote:Going by the weather, you wouldn't know the seasons are shifting... however the peas are on their final blooms, the onion stalks are falling over, and the potatoes vines have all withered. Still 1.5-2 months until frost threat arrives. Time to plant for the winter garden!
George, that reminds me, I need to plant my peas for the fall. We are in the Willamette Valley, and are currently getting several days of 100 F+ temperature, so the challenge of keeping seeds moist enough to germinate is real! Enjoy your cooler (I hope) weather!

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one » Sat Aug 20, 2016 9:40 pm

The heat! The heat!

I pulled up a dozen onions to dry in the Thursday-Friday sun... oops, instead of drying, they cooked! Compost pile wins this round.

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Kriegsspiel
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Re: Garden Log

Post by Kriegsspiel » Wed Aug 24, 2016 8:55 am

http://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/h ... per-world/
"It's kinda like eating molten lava."

Anyone down for growing 1.5 million Scoville unit peppers? I imagine it's like the Fight Club "This is a chemical burn" scene, but in your mouth.

llorona
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Re: Garden Log

Post by llorona » Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:07 pm

Vegetable Garden Porn

Strawberries grown in hanging baskets
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Transylvanian garlic (not so pretty but very tasty!)
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Early Girl tomato salad with basil
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Sugar snap peas from the spring
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Roma Grape tomatoes
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Mini red bell peppers (strawberry included for size comparison)
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7Wannabe5
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Re: Garden Log

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:11 pm

SEXY!!!

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jennypenny
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Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny » Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:46 pm

I'm jealous llorona!

Even in this dismal gardening season, the German Johnson tomatoes are again producing an incredible yield. That's three years running in different conditions. They are really tasty, and heirlooms, too. My only complaint is that they don't last long once picked, so you'd better have plans for them when you pick them.

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llorona
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Re: Garden Log

Post by llorona » Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:49 pm

@7WB5: Don't the strawberries make you go weak in the knees? :oops:

@JP: Those are beautiful tomatoes! Are they good for sauce?

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jennypenny
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Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny » Thu Aug 25, 2016 4:55 pm

Not really. I think they are too meaty for sauces, if that makes sense. They are best for slicing or frying even though they are small-ish. They are also attractive so they look great stuffed.

rosecity80
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Re: Garden Log

Post by rosecity80 » Fri Aug 26, 2016 8:11 pm

Dat tomato/basil salad - I can taste it from here!

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CECTPA
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Re: Garden Log

Post by CECTPA » Sat Aug 27, 2016 6:56 am

I'm sooooo jealous about all the tomatoes you guys!
I regret I didn't plant any. I thought I would not have time, but now I realise that I would, and DH does A LOT in the garden too. So next year.

My brussel sprouts got all eaten by caterpillars, oh well.
But I'm having a beautiful second harvest of peas! The plants did not die in the heat, it wasn't too hot of a summer.
Looks like I'll also have a decent harvest of corn, beans, sunflowers and edamame-soybeans.

Question. Does someone grow beans not to eat as green beans, but as dry beans? Do you guy eat them before they dried completely? I understand that for storage you need to have them 100% dry. But for example, if I want to pick and cook some in the soup same day, are they going to taste any good?

7Wannabe5
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Re: Garden Log

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Sat Aug 27, 2016 9:16 am

Fresh beans taste much better in soup.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one » Sat Aug 27, 2016 8:52 pm

I think I've had lima beans as "not dried". Actually, I'm certain of it since they come in the frozen veggie packs.

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CECTPA
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Re: Garden Log

Post by CECTPA » Mon Aug 29, 2016 1:55 pm

Thanks for the answers! I'll try to use these in soups:

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It was a cold night and according to the locals the farm about 30 km to the North had a frost last night :o

Here's the first harvest of corn. It is so small because it is a short season dwarf variety - Orchard Baby. The other factors that restricted the growth were: rather cold summer, lack of experience, poor soil (tilled lawn with sod removed). The other corn, that was planted into a no-till plot is doing much-much better, but not ready to be picked (different variety).

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It is delicious! Will plant this variety next year for sure. In Russia we don't really eat sweet corn, we wait until it is more mature and starchy and then boil it for 30-40 minutes. More calories and more filling food. If you like Mexican homini, then you know what I'm talking about.

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Pedal2Petal
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Re: Garden Log

Post by Pedal2Petal » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:36 pm

jennypenny wrote:I'm jealous llorona!

Even in this dismal gardening season, the German Johnson tomatoes are again producing an incredible yield. That's three years running in different conditions. They are really tasty, and heirlooms, too. My only complaint is that they don't last long once picked, so you'd better have plans for them when you pick them.

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What weight of tomatoes per plant are you getting for German Johnson? I want to know what's a realistic expectation per tomato plant.
Last edited by Pedal2Petal on Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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jennypenny
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Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:37 pm

@P2P--Hmm, we probably get a couple dozen good tomatoes per plant with some ugly bettys mixed in. They are less than a pound each with some only half a pound. So I'd guess 10-15 lbs/plant. I get the early, indeterminate variety. I plant them upright, not hanging or along the ground.

GJs supposedly like it hot with Brandywines being better up north, but that hasn't been my experience. Brandywines need a longer season so I would recommend GJs to you in Vancouver. You could also try Rutgers tomatoes. They are tasty but smaller (about the same size as GJs), so fewer problems, more tomatoes per plant, and the plant doesn't get as big as the Brandywine types. I've also had Rutgers plants continue to produce fruit past halloween as long as we haven't had a freeze (I can protect them from a frost).

If my visit to Vancouver was typical, you don't get a ton of sunshine up there. The plants might benefit from a reflective mulch or being near a wall where they could catch reflected light as well.

7Wannabe5
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Re: Garden Log

Post by 7Wannabe5 » Thu Sep 01, 2016 6:31 am

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Johnson-Brandywine heirloom cross grown without staking in full sun and rich compost 42.4 degrees North latitude. My sister turned it into salsa before I had a chance to weigh it.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one » Thu Sep 01, 2016 4:53 pm

Knowing it would rain today, I planned on lifting the majority of the onions. Took a nap and awoke to the sound of drip-drip in the downspouts... fortunately the drops were light & scattered, so I hurried out and got the deed done before the rain thickened up. Also did a touch of weeding/cleanup, but haven't gotten to pulling out the peas.

Found a couple more little watermelons have set on. Hmm, can't be certain which variety they are unless I trace back the vines. Oh well, they probably won't mature anyways.

rosecity80
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Re: Garden Log

Post by rosecity80 » Sat Sep 03, 2016 12:28 am

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Recent hauls from the garden. We are being hit with a lot of rain and oddly cold weather, although it's supposed to go up to the high 70's next week. On the one hand, I'm thrilled to not water; on the other, the tomatoes are confused and starting to split.

rosecity80
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Re: Garden Log

Post by rosecity80 » Sat Sep 03, 2016 12:28 am

7Wannabe5 wrote:Image

Johnson-Brandywine heirloom cross grown without staking in full sun and rich compost 42.4 degrees North latitude. My sister turned it into salsa before I had a chance to weigh it.
Wowza!

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jennypenny
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Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny » Sat Sep 03, 2016 7:19 am

@rosecity80--nice pics!

I feel the same way about the rain. I'm always happy when it finally comes, but then I find myself out wiping off the bigger fruit to try and keep them from splitting.

rosecity80
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Re: Garden Log

Post by rosecity80 » Mon Sep 05, 2016 12:44 pm

jennypenny wrote:@rosecity80--nice pics!

I feel the same way about the rain. I'm always happy when it finally comes, but then I find myself out wiping off the bigger fruit to try and keep them from splitting.
Oooh, does that work? I'll have to try it!

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jennypenny
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Re: Garden Log

Post by jennypenny » Mon Sep 05, 2016 3:25 pm

rosecity80 wrote:Oooh, does that work? I'll have to try it!
Honestly, I have no idea lol. I just hate to lose fruit when it's almost ready, and get a little OCD about it.

George the original one
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Re: Garden Log

Post by George the original one » Mon Sep 05, 2016 7:44 pm

Plant's water uptake makes them split. In the greenhouse, I've found different varieties have different thresholds (not to mention different tolerances for lack of water... german queen & big beefy have a narrow range between too much & too little whereas early girl has a nice wide tolerance).

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